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Wean at 6 months?

Posted by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 1:59 PM
  • 20 Replies

Hello ladies!

I am a mom of 3, but this is my first time nursing. My other 2 were FF. I love breastfeeding!! I love the feeling I get when I look down at him while he is getting nourishment and comfort. My DS just turned 6 months on yesterday, and everyone has been trying to convince me that 6 months is enough to breastfeed. My sister-in-law is fresh out of medical school, but said that there are no medical benefits after 6 months, and that he already has the antibodies that he needs to fight diseases. My LO is also a big comfort nurser, and I think it annoys people that he stays strapped to me so much. I admit that it is exhausting. I homeschool as well, so I am juggling a lot. I just want to do what is best for  him, even if it means not having much time for anything else. I am just curious about what you ladies think.

by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 1:59 PM
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Replies (1-10):
lifeforchrist
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 2:04 PM
3 moms liked this

You should tell your SIL to go back to school and stop pushing false information. Then ask her how much time she spent studying breastfeeding. The current reccomendation by the world health organization is to go to ATLEAST 2.  And they reccomend EBF until 6 months. That means nothing else other than your milk. People seem to think that means they can then stop. There is no reason to stop now and give formula. Since a baby has to have breast milk or formula be the majority of their diet for the forst year. Other wise you are not supporting brain development.

You are doing an amazing thing and its working for you. I nurse my children until 2, i may go longer but I would never wean before 1 year. Id tell people that they can keep their opinions to themselves because this is about you and your DS so they can but out!

JenniferMiller0
by Bronze Member on Sep. 2, 2013 at 2:05 PM
1 mom liked this

I would just ignore everyone else. Wean when you and your LO are ready.

gdiamante
by Gina on Sep. 2, 2013 at 2:06 PM
1 mom liked this

AAP Reaffirms Breastfeeding Guidelines

2/27/2012

 

Breastfeeding is a natural and beneficial source of nutrition and provides the healthiest start for an infant. In addition to the nutritional benefits, breastfeeding promotes a unique and emotional connection between mother and baby. In the policy statement, "Breastfeeding and the Use of Human Milk," published in the March 2012 issue of Pediatrics (published online Feb. 27), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) reaffirms its recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for about the first six months of a baby's life, followed by breastfeeding in combination with the introduction of complementary foods until at least 12 months of age, and continuation of breastfeeding for as long as mutually desired by mother and baby.

This recommendation is supported by the health outcomes of exclusively breastfed infants and infants who never or only partially breastfed. Breastfeeding provides a protective effect against respiratory illnesses, ear infections, gastrointestinal diseases, and allergies including asthma, eczema and atopic dermatitis. The rate of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) is reduced by over a third in breastfed babies, and there is a 15 percent to 30 percent reduction in adolescent and adult obesity in breastfed vs. non-breastfed infants. Approximately 75 percent of newborn infants initiate breastfeeding. Hospital routines more and more attempt to accommodate the breastfeeding mother. Pediatricians promote the advantages of breastfeeding to mothers and infants, as well as the health risks of not breastfeeding. As such, choosing to breastfeed should be considered an investment in the short- and long-term health of the infant, rather than a lifestyle choice.

Editor's Note: Updated parent information on breastfeeding will be available Feb. 27 on the AAP parenting website at www.healthychildren.org/breastfeeding.   Beginning March 8, www.HealthyChildren.org will be giving away free copies of the AAP book "New Mother's Guide to Breastfeeding," to people who register on the website while supplies last.
 

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The American Academy of Pediatrics is an organization of 60,000 primary care pediatricians, pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists dedicated to the health, safety and well-being of infants, children, adolescents and young adults. (www.aap.org)

- See more at: http://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/pages/AAP-Reaffirms-Breastfeeding-Guidelines.aspx?nfstatus=401&nftoken=00000000-0000-0000-0000-000000000000&nfstatusdescription=ERROR%3a+No+local+token#sthash.jyWgzqVE.dpuf

gdiamante
by Gina on Sep. 2, 2013 at 2:06 PM
3 moms liked this

"In law" is a suffix meaning "to be ignored." DO SO.

Autumn19
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 2:09 PM
My dd will be 2 in dec and still bf
MichaelsCasey
by Member on Sep. 2, 2013 at 2:11 PM
1 mom liked this
Hello! I was the same, first 2 were formula fed and the third was breast fed! Don't listen to your sister in law. Do what YOU think is best. I have always heard that you should nurse for the first year and anything after that is a bonus. I nursed my daughter until she was two and her doctors were very supportive of that :)
GoodyBrook
by on Sep. 2, 2013 at 3:26 PM
1 mom liked this

Unless you specifically asked for an opinion, what the heck are family members doing getting involved in your breastfeeding relationship?

The only ones that have a say in the length of the relationship are those involved!

You're doing a great job, mama!  And there are benefits to breastfeeding beyond 6 months.  Just think of the financial savings from not having to purchase formula!!

stepconfused182
by Kelley on Sep. 2, 2013 at 3:27 PM
Do you know what specialty your SIL will be pursuing in her residency program? If it is anything involving pediatrics, obstetrics or family medicine, you should strongly encourage her to take lactation education to benefit herself and her future patients. The benefits to breastfeeding after 6 months are endless and the benefits of formula remain at none. Let's say for one minute that what she is saying is true about the antibodies and there being no medical benefits to continuing after 6 months. That still wouldn't make formula become beneficial either so what she's saying has no logic. Do what you feel is best for yourself and your baby. You'll never go wrong with continuing to give them the most perfect food ever made.
Cleo07
by Bronze Member on Sep. 2, 2013 at 3:34 PM
3 moms liked this
Sorry but your SIL probably had a 1 page, 10 minute lecture comparing formula and breastmilk like I did in medical school. Please urge her to educate herself before she ruins breastfeeding for a future patient like so many other health care professionals.

There are literally dozens of reasons to breastfeed for at least two years. The immune system is only about 50-60% at one year and increases about ten percent a year till age 5-7 when it is equal to adult immunity. So she is completely wrong on that point as well. Not to mention, the latest research on gut bacterial populations and their impact on health for a lifetime. Won't she be surprised when you know more than her.
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anxiousschk
by Bronze Member on Sep. 2, 2013 at 4:03 PM
1 mom liked this

If you are both happy, keep on going.  I've always heard at least 12 mo by AAP. 

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