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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Fast letdown......thinking pumping exclusively might be the only answer

Posted by on Sep. 7, 2013 at 6:29 PM
  • 31 Replies

I can't take the gassiness any more.  His little face crumples in pain and it breaks my heart........

by on Sep. 7, 2013 at 6:29 PM
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Replies (1-10):
MissGore
by on Sep. 7, 2013 at 6:33 PM

i had this problem. i pumped the first letdown right before i fed her, and kept that up until she was about 2 months. now i have 400+ pumped in the freezer, and we've finally worked it out where my letdown isn't too bad, and she can handle it without gassiness.

anybody need some boobjuice?

MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Sep. 7, 2013 at 6:37 PM
Pumping will not help. Reclined nursing and block feeding are the tools for managing OAL/oversupply. Look up OAL on kellymom.com for complete information.
melindabelcher
by mel on Sep. 7, 2013 at 7:13 PM
Letdown into a towel, once its stopped latch baby. repeat if the subsequent letdowns are also an issue.
Then during the reg feeding still use the positions for oal (baby on top, reclined, side lying) are you currently block feeding, if so for how long?
jackiewal10
by Silver Member on Sep. 7, 2013 at 7:17 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree with block feeding.  Have you tried block feeding?  Curbing the letdown is the key.

K8wizzo
by Kate on Sep. 7, 2013 at 7:20 PM
3 moms liked this
Read this article... http://attachmentparenting.org/blog/2012/06/12/fighting-the-battle-against-oversupply/

Keep in mind that your pump output will decrease over time, so most moms who ep are unable to make it to one year withoit supplementing with formula. If you are okay with that, and with pumping every 2 to 3 hours around the clock, even when baby starts sleeping through the night, and having to deal with all of the dishes, and them bottle feeding for each feeding, and never being able to go anywhere without your pump................ I epd for my first son. I made it six weeks before my ouput dropped and I just couldn't hack it anymore. I was having to pump instead of picking him up when he was fussy, just so he could have his next bottle. If you think gas is heartbreaking, try telling your newborn that you can't snuggle him right now to make it better because this noisy awful plastic thing needs your attention. Yeah, not fun. Add to that the fact that expressed breastmilk, while better than formula, loses some of the benefits of direct breastfeeding. Your baby's saliva on your nipple tells your breasts exactly what antibodies, hormones, and specific nutrient profile your baby needs... a pump does not. The pfysical act of nursing helps baby's oral motor development as well as aiding in digestion by creating peristaltic waves that move milk through the digestive tract, not so with a bottle.

Reclined feeding, blockfeeding, or the method I linked above are what you need to be trying first. After doing those for several weeks if uour oal is still bad, try a nipple shield to slow the flow. It's not best practice, but it sometimes helps and will keep baby at the breast.
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Sep. 7, 2013 at 10:23 PM

Pumping exclusively is the hard way. THe easy way:

Kick hubby out of the recliner if you have one. **grin** If you don't, find a seat that allows you to slouch back. Just the way mom told you not to. Lay baby tummy to tummy on TOP of you. He NEVER goes across your lap under the breast, always on top of the breast. No, he won't suffocate. His nose is designed for this. Latch. Gravity slows the flow.

This won't last long. And bonus: No tummy time needed. He'll do it all while nursing.

thriftymom35
by on Sep. 8, 2013 at 6:29 AM
Quoting melindabelcher:

Letdown into a towel, once its stopped latch baby. repeat if the subsequent letdowns are also an issue.
Then during the reg feeding still use the positions for oal (baby on top, reclined, side lying) are you currently block feeding, if so for how long?



I just do it for two or three feedings.
mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Sep. 8, 2013 at 7:46 AM
I had to nurse in 6 hour blocks to tame oversupply and nursed laying on my side.
melindabelcher
by mel on Sep. 8, 2013 at 8:10 AM
I was up to 12hr blocks so you may want to try to increase your blocks
thriftymom35
by on Sep. 8, 2013 at 10:22 AM


Quoting K8wizzo:

Read this article... http://attachmentparenting.org/blog/2012/06/12/fighting-the-battle-against-oversupply/

Keep in mind that your pump output will decrease over time, so most moms who ep are unable to make it to one year withoit supplementing with formula. If you are okay with that, and with pumping every 2 to 3 hours around the clock, even when baby starts sleeping through the night, and having to deal with all of the dishes, and them bottle feeding for each feeding, and never being able to go anywhere without your pump................ I epd for my first son. I made it six weeks before my ouput dropped and I just couldn't hack it anymore. I was having to pump instead of picking him up when he was fussy, just so he could have his next bottle. If you think gas is heartbreaking, try telling your newborn that you can't snuggle him right now to make it better because this noisy awful plastic thing needs your attention. Yeah, not fun. Add to that the fact that expressed breastmilk, while better than formula, loses some of the benefits of direct breastfeeding. Your baby's saliva on your nipple tells your breasts exactly what antibodies, hormones, and specific nutrient profile your baby needs... a pump does not. The pfysical act of nursing helps baby's oral motor development as well as aiding in digestion by creating peristaltic waves that move milk through the digestive tract, not so with a bottle.

Reclined feeding, blockfeeding, or the method I linked above are what you need to be trying first. After doing those for several weeks if uour oal is still bad, try a nipple shield to slow the flow. It's not best practice, but it sometimes helps and will keep baby at the breast.

Great advice, I pumped my breasts dry and he drank so sweetly after.  I am going to block feed today starting with 6 hours since three hours doesn't seem to be enough.  How do I know when it's time to drain them again??  

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