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2 and a half month old not producing stool?

Posted by on Sep. 17, 2013 at 5:53 PM
  • 14 Replies

My son is two and a half months old and is EBF. He used to be in the 50 percentile and now he is only in the 17 percentile. I change wet diapers anywhere from 10-20 times a day (including overnight) but..He only poops like once every 4 days and sometimes he'll go a whole week without pooping. I'm wondering if there's something wrong with my supply. I'm not short on milk, & we feed on demand but this is making me feel like something is wrong. His pediatrician wasn't too concerned but she wants to keep an eye on his weight because he's not gaining as fast as he was. I'm feeling extremely discouraged and I'm highly considering formula feeding him just so i know he's getting enough. Any advice? Has anyone else been through something like this and if so what did you do?

by on Sep. 17, 2013 at 5:53 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jadedcynic
by on Sep. 17, 2013 at 5:56 PM

Sounds normal to me. Breastfed babies don't poop as much because there is less waste. Check with your pediatrician to be sure, but don't be too worried unless you aren't getting the wet diapers.

MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on Sep. 17, 2013 at 5:57 PM
Nothing wrong here. This is all normal. As long as he's having about five wets on days he doesn't poop then he's getting plenty. Breast milk is so perfect for him, all of it is absorbed. There's hardly any waste!
MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Sep. 17, 2013 at 6:07 PM
Perfectly normal. And those percentiles mean very little. Your baby is perfect just as he is. Someone should have a link to an article that talks about watching the baby rather than the charts.
tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Sep. 17, 2013 at 6:24 PM

This! Can yu give us weights instead of % though


Quoting MommyO2-6631:

Nothing wrong here. This is all normal. As long as he's having about five wets on days he doesn't poop then he's getting plenty. Breast milk is so perfect for him, all of it is absorbed. There's hardly any waste!



mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Sep. 17, 2013 at 6:28 PM
So far it all sounds normal. Even the drop in percentiles doesn't mean anything on its own. Some babies get off to an incredible head start, especially if mom had oversupply, and no baby could continue at that rate or they'd weigh over 40 lbs at a year.
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Sep. 17, 2013 at 6:51 PM

http://drjaygordon.com/pediatricks/newborns/scales.html

Feb 23, 2010
Look at the Baby, Not the Scale

It sounds simple doesn’t it? Yet I have seen so many moms whose babies have looked healthy, nursed well, met developmental milestones one right after the other and have lost all confidence in breastfeeding due to someone telling them that their baby’s weight was not on the charts. This someone was looking at the scale and charts, rather than the baby.

In the first 24 to 72 hours after birth babies tend to lose about 3-10% of their birth weight and then regain that weight over the next 2 to 3 weeks. If a mother receives lots of IV fluids during labor, the baby could be born “heavier” because of the increased water. The somewhat higher weight could be measured if a baby were weighed right before it peed for the first time. The difference of this extra fluid retention might only be a few ounces, but some parents are told to be concerned when, at their baby’s two week checkup, the baby is a few ounces under birth weight.

Another common problem at early checkups is a baby that is not gaining what the practitioner considers to be “normal weight gain.” There is not general agreement on normal weight gain and the range in texts are from 4 to 8 ounces a week. Some babies are genetically destined to be a lot smaller or larger than others. As I mentioned in the first paragraph: Easy concept, isn’t it?

If you have been told that weight gain is not acceptable, look hard at this list of questions:

  • Is your baby eager to nurse?
  • Is your baby peeing and pooping well?
  • Is your baby’s urine either clear or very pale yellow?
  • Are your baby’s eyes bright and alert?
  • Is your baby’s skin a healthy color and texture?
  • Is your baby moving its arms and legs vigorously?
  • Are baby’s nails growing?
  • Is your baby meeting developmental milestones?
  • Is your baby’s overall disposition happy and playful?
  • Yes, your baby sleeps a lot, but when your baby is awake does he have periods of being very alert?

If you have answered yes to the above questions, you may want to progress on to two important questions which the “charts” seem to ignore.

  • How tall is mom?
  • How tall is dad?

If someone were to ask you what weight a 33 year old man should be, you would laugh. The range of possibilities varies according to height, bone structure, ethnicity and many other factors. Yet babies are expected to fit onto charts distributed throughout the country with no regard to genetics, feeding choice or almost anything else.

There can be nursing problems that can cause slow weight gain; an inadequate “latch-on” is probably the only common breastfeeding problem in the first weeks. This is an easily remedied problem with the right help. In the best of circumstances, breastfeeding should be assessed within the first day or two after birth by a skilled lactation expert. Good hospitals have these LC’s and IBCLC’s on staff and, if not, please line up a consultation within the first 12 hours of life. Your pediatrician can help you with this. If not, call La Leche League and ask them whom they recommend in your area. This is a crucial step in becoming a parent and must not be skipped.

If there are nursing problems, the first answer should never be supplementation but must be to find the best advice and help available. Find quality help in person if possible and online if needed. There is nothing better than having an experienced breastfeeding expert watch you and your baby and give you the help and encouragement and support you need and deserve.
Too many mothers and babies lose the breastfeeding experience and the lifesaving and illness preventing benefits because we doctors are trained to look harder at the scale than we are at the baby.

A few notable examples:

  • Baby, birth weight: 9 lbs. 12 oz.
    Weight 36 hours after delivery: 9 lbs. 2 oz.

I have seen mothers encouraged to supplement because “they have no milk, the baby is hungry and losing weight.” The baby looks good and is nursing every 1 to 3 hours and mom’s nipples are not getting sore. There is no need to do anything but nurse often, switch breasts every 5 minutes or so and wait another day or two for the milk to come in. A thirsty baby nurses strongly and is in no danger. A baby given water or formula might not nurse so strongly and mom’s confidence (and milk supply) will suffer for it. This mom only needs the support of an expert who can be sure that she knows how to latch her baby on to the breast.

  • Same baby, two week checkup: 9 lbs. 6 oz

Forgetting that this represents a 4 oz. weight gain from the 36 hour weight, some docs might recommend supplementation. Again, watch breastfeeding and if everything is going well, don’t worry. A dry, jaundiced baby with darker yellow urine is a different case and needs more help with nursing. This baby still should not get formula. Make sure mom is drinking enough water, nursing often without a set schedule (every 1 to 3 hours) and make very sure that she gets help latching her baby on, especially if she has sore nipples.

  • Same baby, six month checkup: 15 lbs.

Lactation consultation had been successful in the early weeks thanks to mom having found a supportive, smart doctor and being determined to succeed at feeding her baby the best. This big baby (9 lbs. 12 oz. at birth, remember?) had weighed 13 pounds at her four month visit and now weighs 15 pounds. The doctor is paying attention and sees that Mom is 5′ 3″ and Dad is 5′ 9″ and slender. He looks at the charts second and the baby first and isn’t concerned about the baby dropping from a very high percentile at birth to a lower one and then to a lower one still.

I think I’ll conclude this scenario with this happy ending.

In summary, babies who are nursing, peeing clear urine and wetting diapers well in the first weeks of life are almost always all right. I cannot recall seeing a baby for whom slow weight gain in the first 2 to 6 weeks was the only sign of a problem.

Older babies, 2 to 12 months of age, grow at varying rates. Weight gain should not be used as a major criterion of good health. Developmental milestones and interaction with parents and others are more important. Do not be persuaded to supplement a baby who is doing well. Get help with breastfeeding and use other things besides weight to guide you.

Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Sep. 17, 2013 at 6:54 PM
I agree with the others- NORMAL! :-)
HypnoKitty
by Member on Sep. 17, 2013 at 9:02 PM

He's 12 pounds

shortyali
by Alicia on Sep. 18, 2013 at 1:27 AM
What is his full weight history?

Quoting HypnoKitty:

He's 12 pounds

Junebaby18
by Nannerz on Sep. 18, 2013 at 2:51 AM
Your supply is more than enough, especially if you're chnging that many diapers per day. What goes in must come out. They only need 6-8 per day and he's surpassing that by a landslide!
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