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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Tips? Pointers?

Posted by on Oct. 15, 2013 at 3:15 AM
  • 8 Replies

I went from EBF to EPing when my son was about 2 weeks old. He was losing weight and nursing was excessively painful and frustrating for both of us. He would fight and scream, pop on and off, and fall asleep at the breast.

Later we found out that he was lip and tongue tied and simply couldn't nurse efficently. We had the revision done at 11 weeks. I have been doing skin to skin when we can, bedsharing, and offering the breast as much as possible.

I've found that offering it for the MOTN feeding just ends in screaming frustration from LO as he is tired and just wants to eat and go back to sleep :-(

He has no interest in bathtub/shower nursing.

We have tried with a shield, without a shield, and using a finger feeding syringe to 'prime' the shield so he associates milk with the breast.

We're using the Medela Calma nipples right now, as LO was chewing on the Avent nipples to get the milk instead of sucking. Is there a different nipple we should try?

Aside from skin to skin and offering before each bottle, is there anything else I can do to increase his interest? I've gotten him to nurse twice since the procedure, and latch a few different times.

TIA

by on Oct. 15, 2013 at 3:15 AM
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Replies (1-8):
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Oct. 15, 2013 at 9:28 AM


Quoting monkeybelle83:

I went from EBF to EPing when my son was about 2 weeks old. He was losing weight and nursing was excessively painful and frustrating for both of us. He would fight and scream, pop on and off, and fall asleep at the breast.

Later we found out that he was lip and tongue tied and simply couldn't nurse efficently. We had the revision done at 11 weeks. I have been doing skin to skin when we can, bedsharing, and offering the breast as much as possible.

Excellent.

I've found that offering it for the MOTN feeding just ends in screaming frustration from LO as he is tired and just wants to eat and go back to sleep :-(

He has no interest in bathtub/shower nursing.

We have tried with a shield, without a shield, and using a finger feeding syringe to 'prime' the shield so he associates milk with the breast.

We're using the Medela Calma nipples right now, as LO was chewing on the Avent nipples to get the milk instead of sucking. Is there a different nipple we should try?

ANY nipple but the Calma! Throw those things away. IBCLCs have warned of precisley your problem with the calma.

Actually, CUP. Remove the spill proof valve. Feeder tips. Baby sips. Or better, supplemental nursing system for all feeds. It gets him used to the idea that breast = feed.

But above all, trash the Calmas.


Aside from skin to skin and offering before each bottle, is there anything else I can do to increase his interest? I've gotten him to nurse twice since the procedure, and latch a few different times.

TIA


monkeybelle83
by on Oct. 15, 2013 at 10:39 AM


Quoting gdiamante:


Quoting monkeybelle83:

I went from EBF to EPing when my son was about 2 weeks old. He was losing weight and nursing was excessively painful and frustrating for both of us. He would fight and scream, pop on and off, and fall asleep at the breast.

Later we found out that he was lip and tongue tied and simply couldn't nurse efficently. We had the revision done at 11 weeks. I have been doing skin to skin when we can, bedsharing, and offering the breast as much as possible.

Excellent.

I've found that offering it for the MOTN feeding just ends in screaming frustration from LO as he is tired and just wants to eat and go back to sleep :-(

He has no interest in bathtub/shower nursing.

We have tried with a shield, without a shield, and using a finger feeding syringe to 'prime' the shield so he associates milk with the breast.

We're using the Medela Calma nipples right now, as LO was chewing on the Avent nipples to get the milk instead of sucking. Is there a different nipple we should try?

ANY nipple but the Calma! Throw those things away. IBCLCs have warned of precisley your problem with the calma.

Actually, CUP. Remove the spill proof valve. Feeder tips. Baby sips. Or better, supplemental nursing system for all feeds. It gets him used to the idea that breast = feed.

But above all, trash the Calmas.


Aside from skin to skin and offering before each bottle, is there anything else I can do to increase his interest? I've gotten him to nurse twice since the procedure, and latch a few different times.

TIA


We just got the calmas less than a week ago, and since then, things actually have gotten better, before he'd shriek if I even attempted to latch him. Now he'll lick, latch, nuzzle, just won't nurse. From what I've been finding online that means we're on the right track?

gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Oct. 15, 2013 at 12:25 PM

Yes, you are on the right track. Express a little milk on the nipple before trying to latch.

MommyO2-6631
by Leslie on Oct. 15, 2013 at 12:53 PM
I would always try to stimulate a letdown before attempting to latch, that way he gets instant gratification like with the bottle. Also get an SNS. Just keep working with him and it'll happen. I got my son back to the breast at eight weeks... and shortly after that he refused bottles all together LOL.
monkeybelle83
by on Oct. 15, 2013 at 5:09 PM

We use the finger feeding syringe to put milk in the shield before latching. I rather detest the shield but he seems to need it -_-

Quoting MommyO2-6631:

I would always try to stimulate a letdown before attempting to latch, that way he gets instant gratification like with the bottle. Also get an SNS. Just keep working with him and it'll happen. I got my son back to the breast at eight weeks... and shortly after that he refused bottles all together LOL.


gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Oct. 15, 2013 at 5:33 PM

At the moment, it's better than nothing.

Quoting monkeybelle83:

We use the finger feeding syringe to put milk in the shield before latching. I rather detest the shield but he seems to need it -_-

Quoting MommyO2-6631:

I would always try to stimulate a letdown before attempting to latch, that way he gets instant gratification like with the bottle. Also get an SNS. Just keep working with him and it'll happen. I got my son back to the breast at eight weeks... and shortly after that he refused bottles all together LOL.



maggiemom2000
by Ruby Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 6:53 PM

Try offering the breast AFTER the bottle.

More tips here:

Getting an Older Baby to Breastfeed

There are situations when a mother has an older baby, a baby beyond the newborn stage, who is not breastfeeding. It may be an adopted baby. It may be the case of a child who has weaned and the mother wants to get the baby breastfeeding again. Whatever the reason, there are ways to help transition an older baby, or even toddler, to the breast.

Kellymom.com has some good information on getting baby to the breast. She suggests that, especially with an older baby, you think about coaxing baby to the breast. These are just a few of her suggestions:

Your goal is to coax baby to the breast. Do not attempt to force your baby to breastfeed. Forcing baby to the breast does not work, stresses baby, and can result in baby forming an aversion to the breast. As baby gets better at nursing and is able to get more milk via nursing, he will grow to trust that breastfeeding works and will have more patience when latching. 

  • Lots of skin-to-skin contact can help your baby nurse better and even gain weight faster. Keep your baby with you as much as possible, and give him lots of opportunities to nurse (even if you're not successful). Get skin-to-skin with him, first when he is sleepy, right after a bottle feed (or however you're supplementing). This way baby has the opportunity to sleep and wake up happily, skin to skin at mom's chest, and mom is right there to catch the earliest hunger cues. If baby moves toward the breast and then falls asleep before even mouthing the nipple, or after sucking twice, then these are positive baby steps, not failures.
  • Carry your baby close to you ... "Wear," carry, hold and cuddle your baby as much as possible; carry baby on your hip while doing other things, play with baby, and give baby lots of focused attention.
  • Sleep near your baby. If baby sleeps with you, you'll get more skin-to-skin contact, plus baby has more access to the breast... If baby is not in the same bed, have baby's bed beside your bed or in the same room so that you can catch early feeding cues, breastfeed easier at night, and get more sleep.
  • Nipple shields can be helpful at times for transitioning baby to the breast. Talk to your lactation consultant about using this tool.
  • Comfort nursing is often the first to come, followed by nutritive nursing.Offer the breast for comfort any time you see a chance- at the end of a feeding when baby is not hungry, when baby is going to sleep or just waking up, when baby is asleep, and whenever he needs to comfort suck If your baby is actively resisting nursing, then try encouraging comfort nursing after baby is comfortable with skin-to-skin contact. After baby is willing to nurse for comfort, you can then proceed to working on nursing for "meals" as well.

    You are working to seduce your baby back to breast. Again, coax, don't force!


    There are more things you can try:

    • Offer the breast when he is not hungry.
    • Try giving him most of his feeding by bottle and then switching over to the breast.This is known as the Finish at the Breast method.
    • You can change the way you bottle feed to help the transition. There are methods of bottle feeding that are more supportive of breastfeeding.


    1
    SNS At Breast Supplementer

    If you have tried all of the suggestions above, without success, there is another approach you can try. I will describe steps in a method that is often used to teach older infants to breastfeed. How quickly you go through these steps will depend upon how your baby is responding. You will need an at breast supplementer to do this.

    1
    Lact-Aid At Breast Supplementer

  • First, only mom feeds the baby (both solids and bottles). Baby is always held by mom when being fed.

  • Don’t allow baby to hold his own bottle. If baby is used to holding his own bottle you may need to gradually get him used to you holding it. Put a sock over it so that it looks more like a piece of clothing than a bottle.

  • When baby is comfortable with mom holding the bottle, and being held by mom while feeding, you are ready to try the at breast supplementer (abs). The first step is to thread the tube of the abs through the bottle nipple he usually takes, and feed him that way (you can use a tapestry needle to thread supplementer tube into the nipple, it only needs to stick out a little).

  • Next, move the bottle nipple over your own nipple. Once he is comfortable sucking on the nipple with the abs over your nipple you are ready to try and move him to your breast. Toward the end of the feeding try and switch him to your breast.

  • Once you get baby to latch on to the breast directly, you may try to feed at first with the abs (even if you have a good supply) as baby may like the faster flow he is used to getting from the bottle.You can eventually wean off of the abs (usually very quickly if you have a good supply).

Here is how one mother describes her progress:

From Child of My Heart
All the next day I bottle-fed him in the nursing position. He was content, but I found it so awkward. Breastfeeding leaves you with one hand free, and I'd never really realized that bottle-feeding takes two hands! The next day I began to work on the gradual transition to the breast. My first step was to thread the tiny tube of the nursing supplementer through the same type of bottle nipple he was used to. Then I placed the bottle nipple (without the collar) over my breast for the feeding. This way Joshua got used to being against my skin, while still sucking on his familiar bottle nipple. His formula now flowed from the supplementer rather than the bottle and to all outward appearances, he was breastfeeding.

Another mother describes their progress:

From We Are Breastfeeding
During the third week, I began put the tube of an at-breast supplementer next to the bottle nipple. I planned to put this tube next to my nipple while breastfeeding so he could get more milk at the breast. He needed to get used to that idea, so I pulled the tube through the bottle nipple with a needle, and then filled the supplementer bag with milk... ...At the end of the third week I put the bottle nipple closer to my breast and then right over my breast. Then I could move him toward me into a breastfeeding position. We were almost breastfeeding even though he had not yet latched on. He got milk from me while being held in my arms. He felt my skin next to his belly. He felt my breast against his cheek. He looked into my eyes. He smiled back at me.
Ms.Pteranodon
by Silver Member on Oct. 15, 2013 at 7:30 PM
Just wondering, what's wrong with the calma?

Didn't it just come out?!?


Quoting gdiamante:


Quoting monkeybelle83:

I went from EBF to EPing when my son was about 2 weeks old. He was losing weight and nursing was excessively painful and frustrating for both of us. He would fight and scream, pop on and off, and fall asleep at the breast.

Later we found out that he was lip and tongue tied and simply couldn't nurse efficently. We had the revision done at 11 weeks. I have been doing skin to skin when we can, bedsharing, and offering the breast as much as possible.

Excellent.

I've found that offering it for the MOTN feeding just ends in screaming frustration from LO as he is tired and just wants to eat and go back to sleep :-(

He has no interest in bathtub/shower nursing.

We have tried with a shield, without a shield, and using a finger feeding syringe to 'prime' the shield so he associates milk with the breast.

We're using the Medela Calma nipples right now, as LO was chewing on the Avent nipples to get the milk instead of sucking. Is there a different nipple we should try?

ANY nipple but the Calma! Throw those things away. IBCLCs have warned of precisley your problem with the calma.

Actually, CUP. Remove the spill proof valve. Feeder tips. Baby sips. Or better, supplemental nursing system for all feeds. It gets him used to the idea that breast = feed.

But above all, trash the Calmas.


Aside from skin to skin and offering before each bottle, is there anything else I can do to increase his interest? I've gotten him to nurse twice since the procedure, and latch a few different times.

TIA



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