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is this true?

Posted by on Nov. 2, 2013 at 9:13 AM
  • 42 Replies
Breastfed babies lack vitamin D and calcium she can only obtain it through vitamins (i wasn't 100% sure on lacking vitamin D). And i was reading online that instead of giving baby a supplement that mom can take vitamins and transfers the calcium and vitamin D through breastfeeding? I'm debating buying myself some vitamins instead of giving it to her.
by on Nov. 2, 2013 at 9:13 AM
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Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Nov. 2, 2013 at 10:13 AM

Not true, however considering we live in Michigan and it's hard to get vit. D naturally through sunlight in the winter months from lack of outdoors time, it might be a good idea to get Carlson's drops for her, especially if you are unable to get out regularly. Unless mom has a vitamin deficiency, most babies get exactly what they need from breastmilk, harsh winters and lack of sun aside.

Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Nov. 2, 2013 at 10:16 AM

Also breastmilk is a great source of calcium. :-)

Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Nov. 2, 2013 at 10:20 AM

Found this on kellymom.com:

How does human milk compare to cow’s milk in calcium content?

Human milk contains less calcium than cow’s milk, but the calcium in human milk has over twice the bioavailability of the calcium in cow’s milk. Increasing mom’s calcium intake does not increase the amount of calcium in her milk – mom’s milk has the right amount of calcium even if mom does not get enough in her diet.

Mrseoc
by Member on Nov. 2, 2013 at 10:23 AM

yes they lack vitamen D. In fact the only cases of rickets (skeletal disorder caused by lack of vitamen D through childhood) reported in the US anymore are from breastfed babies. My solution? go outside! get vitamen D from good old Mr Sun!! My baby refused to take the vitamens (i dont blame her they tasted like crap) but the sunshine offers plenty of vitamen D the all natural way. Make sure your baby gets 15 monuets in the sunshine (no sunscreen required) every day. If it's a sunny day outside, just bringing babe to run arronds should offer enough sunshine.

Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Nov. 2, 2013 at 10:53 AM
2 moms liked this

Is your baby at risk for vitamin D deficiency?

First of all, babies rarely need vitamin D supplements. The babies who do need these supplements need them due to a lack of sufficient sunlight. Factors that put your breastfed baby at risk for vitamin D deficiency (rickets) are:

  • Baby has very little exposure to sunlight. For example: if you live in a far northern latitude, if you live in an urban area where tall buildings and pollution block sunlight, if baby is always completely covered and kept out of the sun, if baby is always inside during the day, or if you always apply high-SPF sunscreen.
  • Both mother and baby have darker skin and thus require more sun exposure to generate an adequate amount of vitamin D. Again, this is a “not enough sunlight” issue – the darker your skin pigmentation, the greater the amount of sun exposure needed. There is not much information available on how much more sunlight is needed if you have medium or darker toned skin. See the section below regarding amount of sunlight needed.
  • Mother is deficient in vitamin D – there is increasing evidence in the last few years indicating that vitamin D deficiency is becoming more common in western countries. The amount of vitamin D in breastmilk depends upon mom’s vitamin D status. If baby gets enough sunlight, mom’s deficiency is unlikely to be a problem for baby. However, if baby is not producing enough vitamin D from sunlight exposure, then breastmilk will need to meet a larger percentage of baby’s vitamin D needs. If mom has minimal exposure to sunlight (see above examples) and is not consuming enough foods or supplements containing vitamin D, then she may be vitamin D deficient. More below on supplementing mom with vitamin D.

Vitamin D supplementation is often recommended, particularly in Canada and other northern latitudes since these areas don’t receive much sunlight during certain parts of the year. If you don’t get much sunlight exposure, consider taking a vitamin D supplement. The 2002 results of the Canadian Paediatric Surveillance Program confirmed 20 cases of nutritional rickets in Canada during 6 months of study. The researchers noted that:

“Intermediate- and dark-skinned children who were breast-fed without vitamin D supplementation were at risk for the disease. Among identified cases, the mothers were frequently veiled, did not receive vitamin D supplementation following delivery, and infrequently ingested milk (thus eliminating a potential dietary source of vitamin D)… A subset of residents in Canada are particularly at risk for nutritional rickets, including darker-skinned, breast-fed infants whose mothers adhere to a diet that is low in vitamin D and have limited sun exposure.” [p. 43-44]

Per [Hamosh 1991, p. 156],

“In summary, exclusive breastfeeding results in normal infant bone mineral content when maternal vitamin D status is adequate and the infant is regularly exposed to sunlight. If the infant or mother is not exposed regularly to sunlight, or if the mother’s intake of vitamin D is low, supplements for the infant may be indicated.”

World Health Organization information [Butte 2002, p. 29 PDF] states,

Seximama23
by Bronze Member on Nov. 2, 2013 at 11:03 AM

Mobile Photo

My sister in lae gave her daughter these recommended by the pedi. They are vitamin support for breastfed babies
Ptitchou
by Bronze Member on Nov. 2, 2013 at 11:07 AM
I don't give supplements, however, I think for most, it takes more than the 15 minutes of outside time they've touted here. Just based on my own research. I think there's more deficiency than people think. But I don't think Enfamil makes the solution;)
audmom1218
by Silver Member on Nov. 2, 2013 at 11:08 AM
1 mom liked this
I personally won't give dd anything from a formula company. There are better brands of just d vitamins out there that don't taste nasty.


Quoting Seximama23:

Mobile Photo

My sister in lae gave her daughter these recommended by the pedi. They are vitamin support for breastfed babies

mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Nov. 2, 2013 at 11:22 AM
1 mom liked this
AMEN TO THAT! This is part of a marketing strategy to make breastfeeding mothers question whether their milk is insufficient. Sunshine or D-only drops.

Quoting audmom1218:

I personally won't give dd anything from a formula company. There are better brands of just d vitamins out there that don't taste nasty.




Quoting Seximama23:

Mobile Photo

My sister in lae gave her daughter these recommended by the pedi. They are vitamin support for breastfed babies

Seximama23
by Bronze Member on Nov. 2, 2013 at 11:25 AM
Okay..it was just a suggestion. .not a stepping on toes thing. My son didn't need them because I still took vitamins and went outside with him. But I am in michigan and due with number 2 in jan...sun is limited lol.


Quoting mostlymaydays:

AMEN TO THAT! This is part of a marketing strategy to make breastfeeding mothers question whether their milk is insufficient. Sunshine or D-only drops.



Quoting audmom1218:

I personally won't give dd anything from a formula company. There are better brands of just d vitamins out there that don't taste nasty.






Quoting Seximama23:

Mobile Photo

My sister in lae gave her daughter these recommended by the pedi. They are vitamin support for breastfed babies


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