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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Pumping Advice

Posted by on Nov. 6, 2013 at 6:45 AM
  • 11 Replies
1 mom liked this

I know that most posts on here about pumping questions turn in to discussions about feeding your child less while you are gone and being happy with the 1/2 to 2 ounces that are normal to get while pumping, but I can't help but think there is a right way to pump and possible tricks that we could be sharing with each other. I had a lactation consultant help me nurse correctly, but noone taught me to pump. So here is what I feel helps, I have no authority or scientific literature to support this, this is just works for me and could very well be superstition. 

1. Use a hands free bustier - even if you try cutting holes in a sports bra. Aside from being a convenience, I feel like I get so much better and consistent suction than holding them myself. 

2. Make sure your nipple is going straight down the center of the cone

3. Don't lean back 

4. Try to distract yourself - Just like a watched pot never boils, when I watch the bottles, I feel like my pumping is taking forever and nothing happens, I end up giving up and find I actually wasn't pumping that long; however in the morning when I hook up and then surf the internet I have pretty much forgotten that I'm pumping and have over flowed the bottle. 

5. Continue pumping even when it looks like your milk has stopped.- When I have the time I try to keep pumping even if I have stopped seeing milk. I figure if a hungry baby can teach my breasts that wasn't enough food, my pump can give it a try as well. 

Well that's what I have, does any one else have any tricks (no matter how silly them seem) that they use when pumping?

by on Nov. 6, 2013 at 6:45 AM
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Replies (1-10):
K8wizzo
by Kate on Nov. 6, 2013 at 7:34 AM
Google hands on pumping. It is a research supported method of increasing the amount of milk expressed byt doing massage and compressions during pumping and then hand expressiong after pumping. Typically this is used by exclusively pumping moms and those trying to bring in and maintain a supply when baby is in the nicu, but it would benefit working moms as well. For me, scent is powerful, so when my baby was in the nicu we did a blanket exchange--I swaddled him in blankets that had been inside my bra and smelled like me and I pumped witha blanket that smelled like him on my shoulder.

The one ounce per hr rule is research supported--ebf babies take in an average of 25 oz per day at the breast. That number does not change from 4 weeks of age to 12 months of age.
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Nov. 6, 2013 at 9:18 AM

All your tips are fine. Cannot think of a one to add. But no, a pump cannot teach your breasts. Your body does know the difference.

As stated, the advice on what to leave is researched. Based on baby's daily need of 24-30 ounces per day.

aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Nov. 6, 2013 at 9:48 AM
Those are great tips! I think I have read most of them before. Thankfully, I did not have to pump for my babies.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Steph_G.
by Member on Nov. 6, 2013 at 8:39 PM


I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 

Quoting gdiamante:

All your tips are fine. Cannot think of a one to add. But no, a pump cannot teach your breasts. Your body does know the difference.

I am not saying there isn't a difference, but I find it hard to believe that stimulation from a pump cannot have an effect, even though it might be a smaller or different effect. If the pump stimulation was not effective how would you explain:

1. There are people who exclusively pump for their child, if the pump doesn't provide any kind of feedback how did they maintain, let alone sustain, any kind of demand. 

2. I know that my body responds to a pump because I can go in to pump with no indication from my body that I am ready to pump and as soon as the cones touch my skin that my body begins to tingle because it knows that it is now time to give milk, so just like some people can respond to their baby crying, I can respond to the presence of my pump

3. If your body truly knew what your baby needed then people wouldn't be able to artificially increase the demand that their body is trying to meet when the donate milk for someone else. 

As stated, the advice on what to leave is researched. Based on baby's daily need of 24-30 ounces per day.

I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 



Steph_G.
by Member on Nov. 6, 2013 at 8:40 PM


Thanks for the suggesting of something tha smells like baby. I have often heard/advocated the idea of giving baby something that smells like mommy to help with separation and though it is seems obvious the reverse would be helpful, I had never thought of it. 

Quoting K8wizzo:

Google hands on pumping. It is a research supported method of increasing the amount of milk expressed byt doing massage and compressions during pumping and then hand expressiong after pumping. Typically this is used by exclusively pumping moms and those trying to bring in and maintain a supply when baby is in the nicu, but it would benefit working moms as well. For me, scent is powerful, so when my baby was in the nicu we did a blanket exchange--I swaddled him in blankets that had been inside my bra and smelled like me and I pumped witha blanket that smelled like him on my shoulder.

The one ounce per hr rule is research supported--ebf babies take in an average of 25 oz per day at the breast. That number does not change from 4 weeks of age to 12 months of age.



aehanrahan
by Group Mod - Amy on Nov. 6, 2013 at 8:45 PM
1 mom liked this
I have seen these kinds of things shared many times in the 6+ years of being in this group.

Quoting Steph_G.:


I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 


Quoting gdiamante:

All your tips are fine. Cannot think of a one to add. But no, a pump cannot teach your breasts. Your body does know the difference.

I am not saying there isn't a difference, but I find it hard to believe that stimulation from a pump cannot have an effect, even though it might be a smaller or different effect. If the pump stimulation was not effective how would you explain:

1. There are people who exclusively pump for their child, if the pump doesn't provide any kind of feedback how did they maintain, let alone sustain, any kind of demand. 

2. I know that my body responds to a pump because I can go in to pump with no indication from my body that I am ready to pump and as soon as the cones touch my skin that my body begins to tingle because it knows that it is now time to give milk, so just like some people can respond to their baby crying, I can respond to the presence of my pump

3. If your body truly knew what your baby needed then people wouldn't be able to artificially increase the demand that their body is trying to meet when the donate milk for someone else. 

As stated, the advice on what to leave is researched. Based on baby's daily need of 24-30 ounces per day.

I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 




Posted on CafeMom Mobile
K8wizzo
by Kate on Nov. 6, 2013 at 10:24 PM
Agreed. I have shared these tips many times. SOME moms are able to exclusively pump for a year or longer, most are not. SOME moms are able to donate over long periods of time, others only until supply regulates. Pump response is different for everyone, no matter what they try. I was able to ep for my oldest for a while but when my youngest was 5 days old and I had to supplement I couldn't pump a drop, even knowing all of my pumping strategies, even though my milk had come in..... nothing. It's a very individual thing.

Quoting aehanrahan:

I have seen these kinds of things shared many times in the 6+ years of being in this group.



Quoting Steph_G.:


I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 



Quoting gdiamante:

All your tips are fine. Cannot think of a one to add. But no, a pump cannot teach your breasts. Your body does know the difference.

I am not saying there isn't a difference, but I find it hard to believe that stimulation from a pump cannot have an effect, even though it might be a smaller or different effect. If the pump stimulation was not effective how would you explain:

1. There are people who exclusively pump for their child, if the pump doesn't provide any kind of feedback how did they maintain, let alone sustain, any kind of demand. 

2. I know that my body responds to a pump because I can go in to pump with no indication from my body that I am ready to pump and as soon as the cones touch my skin that my body begins to tingle because it knows that it is now time to give milk, so just like some people can respond to their baby crying, I can respond to the presence of my pump

3. If your body truly knew what your baby needed then people wouldn't be able to artificially increase the demand that their body is trying to meet when the donate milk for someone else. 

As stated, the advice on what to leave is researched. Based on baby's daily need of 24-30 ounces per day.

I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 





tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Nov. 6, 2013 at 11:26 PM

Pump from early one once a day fi you must return to work so that your body knows how to respond to the pump AND the baby as well.

gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Nov. 6, 2013 at 11:55 PM


Quoting Steph_G.:

I am not saying there isn't a difference, but I find it hard to believe that stimulation from a pump cannot have an effect, even though it might be a smaller or different effect. If the pump stimulation was not effective how would you explain:

1. There are people who exclusively pump for their child, if the pump doesn't provide any kind of feedback how did they maintain, let alone sustain, any kind of demand. 

They have to work twice as hard to be able to do that pumping as they would to just nurse. You have to run faster and faster to stay in the same place, you know?

2. I know that my body responds to a pump because I can go in to pump with no indication from my body that I am ready to pump and as soon as the cones touch my skin that my body begins to tingle because it knows that it is now time to give milk, so just like some people can respond to their baby crying, I can respond to the presence of my pump

You are rare and lucky. You really are. For most women, pump response declines over time.

3. If your body truly knew what your baby needed then people wouldn't be able to artificially increase the demand that their body is trying to meet when the donate milk for someone else. 

Yeah, it's one of the arguments against intelligent design... the body doesn't know ow many babies it's feeding! Even when you've just given birth! 

Initially the pump CAN increase supply, but over time it does decrease. It's really normal. In a dozen years in groups like this, I can count on one hand the number of moms who didn't have to work harder and harder to keep pumping as year one went on, even when using every one of your tips and taking galactagogues.

Steph_G.
by Member on Nov. 7, 2013 at 6:15 AM

I guess I just wasn't looking at the right threads then because I asked for this advice months ago and when  I do come on I gravitate towards the posts that talk about pumping and the advice I feel I have gotten is, feed baby less, pump in the morning, and then from this post use something that smells like baby. 


Quoting aehanrahan:

I have seen these kinds of things shared many times in the 6+ years of being in this group.

Quoting Steph_G.:


I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 


Quoting gdiamante:

All your tips are fine. Cannot think of a one to add. But no, a pump cannot teach your breasts. Your body does know the difference.

I am not saying there isn't a difference, but I find it hard to believe that stimulation from a pump cannot have an effect, even though it might be a smaller or different effect. If the pump stimulation was not effective how would you explain:

1. There are people who exclusively pump for their child, if the pump doesn't provide any kind of feedback how did they maintain, let alone sustain, any kind of demand. 

2. I know that my body responds to a pump because I can go in to pump with no indication from my body that I am ready to pump and as soon as the cones touch my skin that my body begins to tingle because it knows that it is now time to give milk, so just like some people can respond to their baby crying, I can respond to the presence of my pump

3. If your body truly knew what your baby needed then people wouldn't be able to artificially increase the demand that their body is trying to meet when the donate milk for someone else. 

As stated, the advice on what to leave is researched. Based on baby's daily need of 24-30 ounces per day.

I'm not saying that there isn't basis for the volumes that people give I just feel like there is more information that can be shared and that we should be able to look past that and as a group share things that we have found to be effective. 






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