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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Lump on Nipple *update*

Posted by on Nov. 10, 2013 at 9:57 AM
  • 11 Replies
*update- it appears to be a breast abscess. It broke and drained on its own and is closed now. I have no more symptoms of infection or a fever so that's good. The pain and tenderness is 10xs better than when it was at it's worse (right after it broke). I have to keep an eye in it because it could return and then would need to have it surgically removed.*

I am still EBFing my dd3- almost 9months old. This is the longest I've ever breast fed. Well my left breast had been hurting constantly for about 6 days now (my dd3 is a hard nurser & bites sometimes so I thought the pain was a normal pain I've experienced, but it hasn't gone away). When I looked this morning that's when I found a lump on my left nipple- on the lower side. There appeared to be some discharge but I really couldn't tell if it was puss or just milk, but I thought it would be weird to have milk coming out of a lump in the lower side of my nipple.

Any advice? Is this normal or should I have I checked out?
by on Nov. 10, 2013 at 9:57 AM
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Replies (1-10):
Zazayam
by Nicki on Nov. 10, 2013 at 10:09 AM
1 mom liked this

Milk blister maybe?

wife-4-life
by on Nov. 10, 2013 at 10:11 AM
1 mom liked this
Oooh, what is that exactly. I can't say I've ever heard of that.

Quoting Zazayam:

Milk blister maybe?

Zazayam
by Nicki on Nov. 10, 2013 at 10:13 AM
2 moms liked this

Via Kellymom (LINK)


What is a milk blister?

A milk blister, or blocked nipple pore, is also called a bleb or nipple blister, or simply “milk under the skin.” It occurs when a tiny bit of skin overgrows a milk duct opening and milk backs up behind it. A milk blister usually shows up as a painful white, clear or yellow dot on the nipple or areola (see photo), and the pain tends to be focused at that spot and just behind it. If you compress the breast so that milk is forced down the ducts, the blister will typically bulge outward. Milk blisters can be persistent and very painful during feeding, and may remain for several days or weeks and then spontaneously heal when the skin peels away from the affected area.

This is not the same as a blister on the nipple caused by friction. This type of blister, which may sometimes be a red or brown “blood blister,” can be caused by friction from baby’s improper latch or sucking or from the use of a badly fitting nipple shield or pump. In this type of blister, the problem is nipple damage due to friction, rather than a milk duct opening being blocked. Here is information on healing broken skin in the nipple area, plus more thoughts on the causes of friction or blood blisters.

A white spot on the nipple may also be caused by an obstruction within the milk duct (as opposed to skin covering the milk duct). The obstruction might be a tiny, dry clump of hardened milk or a “string” of fattier, semi-solidified milk. The first type of milk duct obstruction will often pop out from the pressure of nursing or manual expression, or can be gently scraped from the surface of the milk duct with a fingernail. The second type can often be manually expressed from the milk duct; reducing saturated fats can help to prevent recurrence of this type of obstruction. Both of these types of milk duct obstruction are associated with recurrent mastitis.

wife-4-life
by on Nov. 10, 2013 at 10:23 AM
1 mom liked this
Great thanks.

Quoting Zazayam:

Via Kellymom (LINK)


What is a milk blister?


A milk blister, or blocked nipple pore, is also called a bleb or
nipple blister, or simply “milk under the skin.” It occurs when a tiny
bit of skin overgrows a milk duct opening and milk backs up behind it. A
milk blister usually shows up as a painful white, clear or yellow dot
on the nipple or areola (see photo),
and the pain tends to be focused at that spot and just behind it. If
you compress the breast so that milk is forced down the ducts, the
blister will typically bulge outward. Milk blisters can be persistent
and very painful during feeding, and may remain for several days or
weeks and then spontaneously heal when the skin peels away from the
affected area.


This is not the same as a blister on the nipple caused by friction.
This type of blister, which may sometimes be a red or brown “blood
blister,” can be caused by friction from baby’s improper latch or sucking or from the use of a badly fitting nipple shield or pump.
In this type of blister, the problem is nipple damage due to friction,
rather than a milk duct opening being blocked. Here is information on healing broken skin in the nipple area, plus more thoughts on the causes of friction or blood blisters.


A white spot on the nipple may also be caused by an obstruction
within the milk duct (as opposed to skin covering the milk duct). The
obstruction might be a tiny, dry clump of hardened milk or a “string” of
fattier, semi-solidified milk. The first type of milk duct obstruction
will often pop out from the pressure of nursing or manual expression, or
can be gently scraped from the surface of the milk duct with a
fingernail. The second type can often be manually expressed from the
milk duct; reducing saturated fats can help to prevent recurrence of
this type of obstruction. Both of these types of milk duct obstruction
are associated with recurrent mastitis.

wife-4-life
by on Nov. 10, 2013 at 10:38 AM
I just did the wet, hot compress and am nursing her, like kellymom recommended doing for a milk blister. I hope this helps because the pain is horrible. The lump is red and hard.
stepconfused182
by Kelley on Nov. 10, 2013 at 11:55 AM
Milk blisters are *usually* white. What color was the discharge? Did it have a smell to it?

Quoting wife-4-life:

I just did the wet, hot compress and am nursing her, like kellymom recommended doing for a milk blister. I hope this helps because the pain is horrible. The lump is red and hard.
wife-4-life
by on Nov. 10, 2013 at 7:12 PM
The discharge was either white or yellow. It was a very tiny amount and I was in the shower so it got washed away fast. I saw a pic online through kellymom and it doesn't look like what I saw- it's not a white lump.

Quoting stepconfused182:

Milk blisters are *usually* white. What color was the discharge? Did it have a smell to it?



Quoting wife-4-life:

I just did the wet, hot compress and am nursing her, like kellymom recommended doing for a milk blister. I hope this helps because the pain is horrible. The lump is red and hard.
stepconfused182
by Kelley on Nov. 10, 2013 at 7:24 PM
I think you should have your dr take a look at it. It doesn't sounds like a milk blister to me. If it was open and milk was able to run out, it should be getting better. It sounds to me like it might be infected.

Quoting wife-4-life:

The discharge was either white or yellow. It was a very tiny amount and I was in the shower so it got washed away fast. I saw a pic online through kellymom and it doesn't look like what I saw- it's not a white lump.



Quoting stepconfused182:

Milk blisters are *usually* white. What color was the discharge? Did it have a smell to it?





Quoting wife-4-life:

I just did the wet, hot compress and am nursing her, like kellymom recommended doing for a milk blister. I hope this helps because the pain is horrible. The lump is red and hard.
wife-4-life
by on Nov. 10, 2013 at 7:52 PM
I just looked at it and it has what appears to be dried puss (or milk) in a scab form. Man oh man does it hurt. The baby isn't nursing well on that side either. Would I have my PCP or GYNO look at it??

Quoting stepconfused182:

I think you should have your dr take a look at it. It doesn't sounds like a milk blister to me. If it was open and milk was able to run out, it should be getting better. It sounds to me like it might be infected.



Quoting wife-4-life:

The discharge was either white or yellow. It was a very tiny amount and I was in the shower so it got washed away fast. I saw a pic online through kellymom and it doesn't look like what I saw- it's not a white lump.





Quoting stepconfused182:

Milk blisters are *usually* white. What color was the discharge? Did it have a smell to it?







Quoting wife-4-life:

I just did the wet, hot compress and am nursing her, like kellymom recommended doing for a milk blister. I hope this helps because the pain is horrible. The lump is red and hard.
stepconfused182
by Kelley on Nov. 10, 2013 at 8:26 PM
1 mom liked this
I always feel like an obgyn has more experience with that kind of thing. That's who I'd call.

Quoting wife-4-life:

I just looked at it and it has what appears to be dried puss (or milk) in a scab form. Man oh man does it hurt. The baby isn't nursing well on that side either. Would I have my PCP or GYNO look at it??



Quoting stepconfused182:

I think you should have your dr take a look at it. It doesn't sounds like a milk blister to me. If it was open and milk was able to run out, it should be getting better. It sounds to me like it might be infected.





Quoting wife-4-life:

The discharge was either white or yellow. It was a very tiny amount and I was in the shower so it got washed away fast. I saw a pic online through kellymom and it doesn't look like what I saw- it's not a white lump.







Quoting stepconfused182:

Milk blisters are *usually* white. What color was the discharge? Did it have a smell to it?









Quoting wife-4-life:

I just did the wet, hot compress and am nursing her, like kellymom recommended doing for a milk blister. I hope this helps because the pain is horrible. The lump is red and hard.
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