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6 Tips for Pumping Breast Milk at Work-Do you agree with these? Would you add any?

Posted by on Nov. 14, 2013 at 7:43 AM
  • 6 Replies

6 Tips for Pumping Breast Milk at Work

by Adriana Velez 

breast pumpAll right natural mamas, we know how committed you are to breastfeeding your baby as long as possible. And if you're returning to work after having your baby, you know what that means: Pumping milk at work. It may sound daunting, but you can do it! Here's what you need to know. Show up prepared and your transition will be so much easier -- we hope. There are no guarantees when it comes to breastfeeding and pumping. But hopefully these tips will help you get off to the best start.

1. Know your company's policy. There are laws protecting a mother's right to pump breast milk at work in privacy, but some of the smallest companies are exempt. If you can, let your employer know you plan to pump at work and make sure they have a plan for accommodating you. Some employers are a little late to the game, so giving them some advance notice helps them figure out a plan in time for your return.

2. Start pumping a week or two before you return to work. It takes a while for your body to adjust to pumping, and you'll also most likely need some practice using a pump. You'll produce just a little milk at first, and then your supply will usually rise. Pumping just once a day for about 15 minutes (or until you run out of milk) is enough. Freeze the milk in case you need backup after you start work.

3. Don't obsess over quantity. Seriously, don't stress out over it. Milk production can vary greatly. A woman may pump one to three ounces per session -- that's for both breasts, not one. Pump what you can, and supplement with your surplus or with formula if you have to.

4. Plan to pump two to three times a day. Each session should last 10 to 20 minutes. Doone session for every feeding missed if you can. For some moms this may be three times during an eight-hour day. I remember my son adjusting his feedings so he ate more before and after work; I pumped only twice a day.

5. Relax. This is hard to do at work, I know. But before you get started, clear your head, take some deep breaths, and mentally disengage from work as much as possible. A lot of moms say looking at a photo of their baby while pumping helps a lot.

6. Store and transport carefully. As soon as you've finished pumping, cover your milk with a cap. The Centers for Disease Control says fresh breast milk can be kept at room temperaturefor six to eight hours. But to be on the safe side, refrigerate the milk as soon as you can. Transport home in an insulated bag if you can. If you're not planning to use the milk within a day or two, write the date on it. You can keep fresh breast milk in the refrigerator for 24 hours, or in the freezer for two weeks. Thaw frozen milk in the refrigerator or under hot water; microwaving breast milk will kill off nutrients.

Do you have any other pumping advice to give new moms?

 

Image via planet oleary/Flickr

by on Nov. 14, 2013 at 7:43 AM
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Replies (1-6):
tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Nov. 14, 2013 at 8:54 AM
1 mom liked this



Quoting Cafe Jenn:

6 Tips for Pumping Breast Milk at Work

by Adriana Velez 

breast pumpAll right natural mamas, we know how committed you are to breastfeeding your baby as long as possible. And if you're returning to work after having your baby, you know what that means: Pumping milk at work. It may sound daunting, but you can do it! Here's what you need to know. Show up prepared and your transition will be so much easier -- we hope. There are no guarantees when it comes to breastfeeding and pumping. But hopefully these tips will help you get off to the best start.

1. Know your company's policy. There are laws protecting a mother's right to pump breast milk at work in privacy, but some of the smallest companies are exempt. If you can, let your employer know you plan to pump at work and make sure they have a plan for accommodating you. Some employers are a little late to the game, so giving them some advance notice helps them figure out a plan in time for your return.only hourly employees are covered by federal laws

2. Start pumping a week or two before you return to work. It takes a while for your body to adjust to pumping, and you'll also most likely need some practice using a pump. You'll produce just a little milk at first, and then your supply will usually rise. Pumping just once a day for about 15 minutes (or until you run out of milk) is enough. Freeze the milk in case you need backup after you start work.

3. Don't obsess over quantity. Seriously, don't stress out over it. Milk production can vary greatly. A woman may pump one to three ounces per session -- that's for both breasts, not one. Pump what you can, and supplement with your surplus or with formula if you have to.if  a mom supplements with freezer stash or formula it will hurt supply A LOT! This is horrible advise! Mom needs to be mindful of her amounts, pump more often if needed, make sure baby is not overfed too

4. Plan to pump two to three times a day. Each session should last 10 to 20 minutes. Doone session for every feeding missed if you can. For some moms this may be three times during an eight-hour day. I remember my son adjusting his feedings so he ate more before and after work; I pumped only twice a day.plan to pump every 3 or so hours...this could be 4 for some moms..and 10 minutes is NOT long enough.  If I dont pump atleast 20 I dont get much because my good letdowns are at 16 and 23 min

5. Relax. This is hard to do at work, I know. But before you get started, clear your head, take some deep breaths, and mentally disengage from work as much as possible. A lot of moms say looking at a photo of their baby while pumping helps a lot.yes I agree

6. Store and transport carefully. As soon as you've finished pumping, cover your milk with a cap. The Centers for Disease Control says fresh breast milk can be kept at room temperaturefor six to eight hours. But to be on the safe side, refrigerate the milk as soon as you can. Transport home in an insulated bag if you can. If you're not planning to use the milk within a day or two, write the date on it. You can keep fresh breast milk in the refrigerator for 24 hours, NO it can stay in the fridge for 5-8 days 24 horus is after its been thawedor in the freezer for two weeks. ummm no it can be frozen for 3-6 months in a regular freezer and 6-12 months in a deep freezeThaw frozen milk in the refrigerator or under hot water; microwaving breast milk will kill off nutrients.

Do you have any other pumping advice to give new moms?


Image via planet oleary/Flickr


Whoever wrote this needs to get their facts straight!

shortyali
by Alicia on Nov. 14, 2013 at 9:08 AM
My thoughts too. A lot of bad info in the article.

Quoting tabi_cat1023:




Quoting Cafe Jenn:

6 Tips for Pumping Breast Milk at Work

by Adriana Velez 

breast pumpAll right natural mamas, we know how committed you are to breastfeeding your baby as long as possible. And if you're returning to work after having your baby, you know what that means: Pumping milk at work. It may sound daunting, but you can do it! Here's what you need to know. Show up prepared and your transition will be so much easier -- we hope. There are no guarantees when it comes to breastfeeding and pumping. But hopefully these tips will help you get off to the best start.

1. Know your company's policy. There are laws protecting a mother's right to pump breast milk at work in privacy, but some of the smallest companies are exempt. If you can, let your employer know you plan to pump at work and make sure they have a plan for accommodating you. Some employers are a little late to the game, so giving them some advance notice helps them figure out a plan in time for your return.only hourly employees are covered by federal laws

2. Start pumping a week or two before you return to work. It takes a while for your body to adjust to pumping, and you'll also most likely need some practice using a pump. You'll produce just a little milk at first, and then your supply will usually rise. Pumping just once a day for about 15 minutes (or until you run out of milk) is enough. Freeze the milk in case you need backup after you start work.

3. Don't obsess over quantity. Seriously, don't stress out over it. Milk production can vary greatly. A woman may pump one to three ounces per session -- that's for both breasts, not one. Pump what you can, and supplement with your surplus or with formula if you have to.if  a mom supplements with freezer stash or formula it will hurt supply A LOT! This is horrible advise! Mom needs to be mindful of her amounts, pump more often if needed, make sure baby is not overfed too

4. Plan to pump two to three times a day. Each session should last 10 to 20 minutes. Doone session for every feeding missed if you can. For some moms this may be three times during an eight-hour day. I remember my son adjusting his feedings so he ate more before and after work; I pumped only twice a day.plan to pump every 3 or so hours...this could be 4 for some moms..and 10 minutes is NOT long enough.  If I dont pump atleast 20 I dont get much because my good letdowns are at 16 and 23 min

5. Relax. This is hard to do at work, I know. But before you get started, clear your head, take some deep breaths, and mentally disengage from work as much as possible. A lot of moms say looking at a photo of their baby while pumping helps a lot.yes I agree

6. Store and transport carefully. As soon as you've finished pumping, cover your milk with a cap. The Centers for Disease Control says fresh breast milk can be kept at room temperaturefor six to eight hours. But to be on the safe side, refrigerate the milk as soon as you can. Transport home in an insulated bag if you can. If you're not planning to use the milk within a day or two, write the date on it. You can keep fresh breast milk in the refrigerator for 24 hours, NO it can stay in the fridge for 5-8 days 24 horus is after its been thawedor in the freezer for two weeks. ummm no it can be frozen for 3-6 months in a regular freezer and 6-12 months in a deep freezeThaw frozen milk in the refrigerator or under hot water; microwaving breast milk will kill off nutrients.

Do you have any other pumping advice to give new moms?


Image via planet oleary/Flickr



Whoever wrote this needs to get their facts straight!

gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Nov. 14, 2013 at 9:40 AM

You know, the biggest problem I had with this article was starting it out with "natural mamas." There's a granola-crunching image that goes with those words that a lot of women don't relate to and can be a turnoff. There was certainly one glaring inaccuracy towards the end. Regarding some of the other points tabi raised:

1. While it's true the law covers hourly employees, salaried employees typically get lots more leeway in their day. In the years of moderating boards like this, the at-work problems I've seen reported are among the hourly workers, especially those in food service, factory work or retail.

3. Formula does exist for a reason. The article should have noted the correct amount of milk needed by baby per day, 1- 1.25 ounces per hour. If a mom cannot meet that target no matter how often she pumps, that's what formula exists for. 

4. I had no problem with the time amount. 10-20 minutes is a good median. I needed 10-15 minutes. Tabi needs 20. We've had moms here who needed 5! The idea is, pump as many times as you can manage, for as long as you can manage. I would have added the idea of morning pump sessions at home.

Item 6 is definitely wrong info.

Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Nov. 14, 2013 at 12:17 PM
Agreed, but 10 minutes is more than plenty time for me....I had a friend who took 40 minutes to get 2 oz, so I just think.this varies from person to person.


Quoting tabi_cat1023:




Quoting Cafe Jenn:

6 Tips for Pumping Breast Milk at Work

by Adriana Velez 

breast pumpAll right natural mamas, we know how committed you are to breastfeeding your baby as long as possible. And if you're returning to work after having your baby, you know what that means: Pumping milk at work. It may sound daunting, but you can do it! Here's what you need to know. Show up prepared and your transition will be so much easier -- we hope. There are no guarantees when it comes to breastfeeding and pumping. But hopefully these tips will help you get off to the best start.

1. Know your company's policy. There are laws protecting a mother's right to pump breast milk at work in privacy, but some of the smallest companies are exempt. If you can, let your employer know you plan to pump at work and make sure they have a plan for accommodating you. Some employers are a little late to the game, so giving them some advance notice helps them figure out a plan in time for your return.only hourly employees are covered by federal laws

2. Start pumping a week or two before you return to work. It takes a while for your body to adjust to pumping, and you'll also most likely need some practice using a pump. You'll produce just a little milk at first, and then your supply will usually rise. Pumping just once a day for about 15 minutes (or until you run out of milk) is enough. Freeze the milk in case you need backup after you start work.

3. Don't obsess over quantity. Seriously, don't stress out over it. Milk production can vary greatly. A woman may pump one to three ounces per session -- that's for both breasts, not one. Pump what you can, and supplement with your surplus or with formula if you have to.if  a mom supplements with freezer stash or formula it will hurt supply A LOT! This is horrible advise! Mom needs to be mindful of her amounts, pump more often if needed, make sure baby is not overfed too

4. Plan to pump two to three times a day. Each session should last 10 to 20 minutes. Doone session for every feeding missed if you can. For some moms this may be three times during an eight-hour day. I remember my son adjusting his feedings so he ate more before and after work; I pumped only twice a day.plan to pump every 3 or so hours...this could be 4 for some moms..and 10 minutes is NOT long enough.  If I dont pump atleast 20 I dont get much because my good letdowns are at 16 and 23 min

5. Relax. This is hard to do at work, I know. But before you get started, clear your head, take some deep breaths, and mentally disengage from work as much as possible. A lot of moms say looking at a photo of their baby while pumping helps a lot.yes I agree

6. Store and transport carefully. As soon as you've finished pumping, cover your milk with a cap. The Centers for Disease Control says fresh breast milk can be kept at room temperaturefor six to eight hours. But to be on the safe side, refrigerate the milk as soon as you can. Transport home in an insulated bag if you can. If you're not planning to use the milk within a day or two, write the date on it. You can keep fresh breast milk in the refrigerator for 24 hours, NO it can stay in the fridge for 5-8 days 24 horus is after its been thawedor in the freezer for two weeks. ummm no it can be frozen for 3-6 months in a regular freezer and 6-12 months in a deep freezeThaw frozen milk in the refrigerator or under hot water; microwaving breast milk will kill off nutrients.

Do you have any other pumping advice to give new moms?


Image via planet oleary/Flickr



Whoever wrote this needs to get their facts straight!


Steph_G.
by Member on Nov. 15, 2013 at 6:50 AM

Yeah those storage conditions are ridiculous. As for the time, my pump breaks are from 15-20 minutes from the time I leave my desk to the time I get back, though I'm sure it varies alot between people. I have always felt I should look into what the laws were for the work place, but noone has given me a hard time so I haven't gotten around to it. Though a coworker told me she heard my boss's boss telling my boss "Can't you just tell her to stop breastfeeding." However, I have no context so I'm not sure how serious he was. 

tabi_cat1023
by Group Mod - Tabitha on Nov. 15, 2013 at 12:59 PM



Quoting Steph_G.:

Yeah those storage conditions are ridiculous. As for the time, my pump breaks are from 15-20 minutes from the time I leave my desk to the time I get back, though I'm sure it varies alot between people. I have always felt I should look into what the laws were for the work place, but noone has given me a hard time so I haven't gotten around to it. Though a coworker told me she heard my boss's boss telling my boss "Can't you just tell her to stop breastfeeding." However, I have no context so I'm not sure how serious he was. 

OH yes because your boss has the right to tell you what to do in your persnal life?? lol


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