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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

So frustrating!! Why does this always happen!

Posted by on May. 25, 2014 at 11:26 PM
  • 14 Replies
I had a feeling it would happen and it did... I went from having an awesome happy baby to a baby that fusses all the time and has meltdowns all the time. It started around 7/8 weeks when my supply dipped... He went from sleeping anywhere from 4-6 hours straight at night before needing to eat, to every 3 hours, and now back to every 1-2 hours after a 3 hour stretch in the beginning like he did between birth and 3 weeks old. He sleeps the first stretch in his crib in our room then comes to bed with me after he wakes up just so I don't have to sit up or get up because I'm so tired I was falling asleep sitting up. To top it off, when he does wake up in the middle of the night to nurse now he's difficult to put back to sleep... He wants to comfort nurse all night and I just can't do that. He used to nurse until he started falling asleep then I just put him down in the bed next to me and he went to sleep... Now I have to fight with him to take his paci or he will just cry. Now during the day it's hard to get him to sleep more than half an hour and we have 3-4 meltdowns everyday where he's inconsolable... After awhile of it he just falls asleep in our arms for 20/30 minutes and wakes up again. It's getting to the point I can't get anything done during the day between him and his big brothers(big brothers are loud so he doesn't sleep well unless I'm holding him). I can finally wear him, but I can't really do any cleaning that way... I can't see around him enough and it jars him too much. It also hurts my back to lean over so I can see with him on me. I'm getting exhausted and frustrated. My house is a mess, because I'm so tired and never have enough time to even put the dishes in the dishwasher. I kinda wish I could go back to still having an oversupply just to see if he would go back to sleeping well lol. I'm going to try to put him back in his bed instead of bringing him into bed with me... Either way that's something that needs to be done, but I'm really hoping it will make him less likely to wake for nursing so often. I thought I got lucky with a great sleeper and he's just doing what my other EBF baby did. I hope this isn't an omen of what's to come like with my other EBF baby... My other had issues with gaining weight after my supply dipped from leveling out. First from gaining slowly, to not gaining, and then losing weight until I had to start feeding him table food at 7.5 months on doctor's orders after being hospitalized for FTT. His diaper count has gone down a lot, but still meeting the expected amount of wets. I guess only time will tell, and I can praise the day he starts taking solids and is back to being happy again like my other kiddo.

I just really need some uninterrupted sleep... And a maid apparently lol. I just woke up an hour ago after being in bed almost 10 hours and I feel as if I only slept 5 hours.
by on May. 25, 2014 at 11:26 PM
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Replies (1-10):
jessi2girls
by Bronze Member on May. 25, 2014 at 11:28 PM

growth spurt, babies nurse more when they go through them.. it's common.

But it will pass. 


audmom1218
by Silver Member on May. 26, 2014 at 12:21 AM
1 mom liked this
Hugs mama. This is a huge developmental milestone and has much more to do with baby's growth (brain development) than feeding method. Everything you mentioned sounds so familiar to me and I can absolutely promise you this... It doesn't last forever! It does suck! Especially the sleep deprivation! But it does get easier! This article may help! I noticed whenever dd started to have bad sleeping spells I would offer breast more frequently during the day which helped her tank up for later. Also we had to start nursing in a quiet dark room around 4 months to stretch out the nursing sessions. Good luck mama! You're stronger than you realize'.

http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/claire_niala.html





Why African Babies Don't Cry:
An African Perspective

by Claire Niala
I was born and grew up in Kenya & Cote d'Ivoire. Then from the age of fifteen I lived in the UK. However, I always knew that I wanted to raise my children (whenever I had them) at home in Kenya. And yes, I assumed I was going to have them. I am a modern African woman with two university degrees and I am a fourth generation working woman - but when it comes to children, I am typically African. The assumption remains that you are not complete without them; children are a blessing it would be crazy to avoid. Actually the question does not even arise.

I started my pregnancy in the UK. The urge to deliver at home was so strong that I sold my practice, setup a new business and moved house / country within five months of finding out I was pregnant. I did what most expectant mothers in the UK do - I read voraciously: Our Babies, Ourselves, Unconditional Parenting, anything by the Searses - the list goes on. (My grandmother later commented that babies don't read books - and really all I needed to do was "read" my baby). Everything I read said that African babies cried less than European babies. I was intrigued as to why.

When I went home I observed. I looked out for mothers and babies and they were everywhere (though not very young African ones - those under six weeks were mainly at home). The first thing I noticed is that despite their ubiquitousness it is actually quite difficult to actually "see" a Kenyan baby. They are usually incredibly well wrapped up before being carried or strapped onto their mother (sometimes father).

Even older babies already strapped onto a back are then further protected from the elements by a large blanket. You would be lucky to catch a limb, never mind an eye or nose. It is almost a womb-like replication in the wrapping. The babies are literally cocooned from the stresses of the outside world into which they are entering.

All I needed to do
was "read" my baby.
My second observation was a cultural one. In the UK it was understood that babies cry - in Kenya it was quite the opposite. The understanding is that babies don't cry. If they do - something is horribly wrong and must be done to rectify it immediately. My English sister-in-law summarized it well. "People here" she said "really don't like babies crying, do they?"

For my grandmother
it was simple - nyonyo! It all made much more sense when I finally delivered and my grandmother came from the village to visit. As it happened - my baby did cry a fair amount, and exasperated and tired, I forgot everything I had ever read and sometimes joined in the crying too. Yet for my grandmother it was simple - nyonyo (breastfeed her!). It was her answer to every single peep.
There were times when it was a wet nappy, or the fact that I had put her down, or that she needed burping that was the problem, but mainly she just wanted to be at the breast - it didn't really matter whether she was feeding or just having a comfort moment. I was already wearing her most of the time and co-sleeping with her, so this was a natural extension to what we were doing.

I suddenly learned the not-so-difficult secret as to the joyful silence of African babies. It was a simple needs-met symbiosis that required a total suspension of ideas of "what should be happening" and an embracing of what was actually going on in that moment. The bottom line was that my baby fed a lot - far more than I had ever read about anywhere and at least five times as much as some of the stricter feeding schedules I had heard about.

At about four months, when a lot of urban mothers start to introduce solids as previous guidelines had recommended, my daughter returned to newborn style hourly breastfeeding. She needed hourly feeds and this was a total shock. Over the past four months the time between feeds had slowly started to increase. I had even started to treat the odd patient without my breasts leaking or my daughter's nanny interrupting the session to let me know my daughter needed a feed.

Most of the mothers in my mother and baby group had duly started to introduce baby rice (to stretch the feeds) and all the professionals involved in our children's lives - pediatricians, even doulas, said that this was OK. Mothers needed rest too, we had done amazingly to get to four months exclusive breastfeeding, and they said our babies would be fine. Something didn't ring true for me and even when I tried (half-heartedly) to mix some pawpaw (the traditional weaning food in Kenya) with expressed milk and offered it to my daughter - she was having none of it.

So I called my grandmother. She laughed and asked if I had been reading books again. She carefully explained how breastfeeding was anything but linear. "She'll tell you when she's ready for food - and her body will too." "What will I do until then?" I was eager to know. "You do what you did before, regular nyonyo". So my life slowed down to what felt like a standstill again. While many of my contemporaries marveled at how their children were sleeping longer now that they had introduced the baby rice, and were even venturing to other foods, I was waking hourly or every two hours with my daughter and telling patients that the return to work wasn't panning out quite as I had planned. She'll tell you when
she's ready for food.
I soon found that quite unwittingly I was turning into an informal support service for other urban mothers. My phone number was doing the round and many times while I was feeding my baby I would hear myself uttering the words, "Yes, just keep feeding him/ her." "Yes, even if you have just fed them" "Yes, you might not even manage to get out of your pajamas today" "Yes, you still need to eat and drink like a horse" "No, now might not be the time to consider going back to work if you can afford not to". "It will get easier". I had to just trust this last one as it hadn't gotten easier for me - yet.

A week or so before my daughter turned five months we traveled to the UK for a wedding and for her to meet family and friends. Especially because I had very few other demands, I kept up her feeding schedule easily. Despite the disconcerted looks of many strangers as I fed my daughter in many varied public places (most designated breastfeeding rooms were in rest rooms which I just could not bring myself to use), we carried on.

At the wedding, the people whose table we sat at noted, "She is such an easy baby - though she does feed a lot". I kept my silence, then another lady commented, "Though I did read somewhere that African babies don't cry much." I could not help but laugh.

My grandmother's gentle wisdom:

Offer the breast every single moment that your baby is upset - even if you have just fed her.
Co-sleep. Many times you can feed your baby before they are fully awake, which will allow them to go back to sleep easier and get you more rest.
Always take a flask of warm water with bed to you at night to keep you hydrated and the milk flowing.
Make the feeding your priority (especially during growth spurts) and get everyone else around you to do as much as they can for you. There is very little that cannot wait.
Read your baby, not the books. Breastfeeding is not linear - it goes up and down (and also in circles). You are the expert on your baby's needs.


gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on May. 26, 2014 at 12:26 AM


Quoting Mrs.Pedro: I had a feeling it would happen and it did... I went from having an awesome happy baby
Heh heh... those are the dangerous ones, you know! NEVER TRUST A HAPPY BABY! **grin** But let's see what's going on.
to a baby that fusses all the time and has meltdowns all the time. It started around 7/8 weeks when my supply dipped...
Can you explain what leads you to believe there was a dip?
He went from sleeping anywhere from 4-6 hours straight at night before needing to eat, to every 3 hours, and now back to every 1-2 hours after a 3 hour stretch in the beginning like he did between birth and 3 weeks old.
The current sleeping pattern is quite normal. Never get used to any sleep pattern because it will change CONSTANTLY. You WANT the waking; it's SIDS defense and a supply builder. Too much sleep can lead to Failure to Thrive.
He sleeps the first stretch in his crib in our room then comes to bed with me after he wakes up just so I don't have to sit up or get up because I'm so tired I was falling asleep sitting up.
PERFECT.
To top it off, when he does wake up in the middle of the night to nurse now he's difficult to put back to sleep... He wants to comfort nurse all night and I just can't do that.
Unfortunately babies are kind of self-centered here; as far as they are concerned THEY are the center of the universe. Not much to do to change this; it's something that's outgrown. What you CAN do is sleep when baby sleeps as much as possible and jettison things that keep you from doing so wherever possible. Survival mode: Do that which is needed to live and nothing more. 
He used to nurse until he started falling asleep then I just put him down in the bed next to me and he went to sleep... Now I have to fight with him to take his paci or he will just cry. Now during the day it's hard to get him to sleep more than half an hour and we have 3-4 meltdowns everyday where he's inconsolable... After awhile of it he just falls asleep in our arms for 20/30 minutes and wakes up again. It's getting to the point I can't get anything done during the day between him and his big brothers(big brothers are loud so he doesn't sleep well unless I'm holding him). I can finally wear him, but I can't really do any cleaning that way...
Forget about cleaning. Seriously. No one worth being ever had "World's Greatest Housekeeper" on her tombstone. Unless it's an acutal health hazard, it will wait. Paper plates. Plastic forks. Not as ecologically friendly, I know, but we're talking survival mode.
I can't see around him enough and it jars him too much. It also hurts my back to lean over so I can see with him on me. I'm getting exhausted and frustrated. My house is a mess, because I'm so tired and never have enough time to even put the dishes in the dishwasher.
Is dad helping? He only gets a pass for one of three reasons: He's not present in the home ever due to death or deployment, he's a first responder, or he makes his living handling heavy equipment. Otherwise, he needs to help. And again, paper and plastic. Make your next load of dishes the last one you do for the next month or so.
I kinda wish I could go back to still having an oversupply just to see if he would go back to sleeping well lol. I'm going to try to put him back in his bed instead of bringing him into bed with me... Either way that's something that needs to be done, but I'm really hoping it will make him less likely to wake for nursing so often. I thought I got lucky with a great sleeper and he's just doing what my other EBF baby did. I hope this isn't an omen of what's to come like with my other EBF baby... My other had issues with gaining weight after my supply dipped from leveling out. First from gaining slowly, to not gaining, and then losing weight until I had to start feeding him table food at 7.5 months on doctor's orders after being hospitalized for FTT. His diaper count has gone down a lot, but still meeting the expected amount of wets. I guess only time will tell, and I can praise the day he starts taking solids and is back to being happy again like my other kiddo. I just really need some uninterrupted sleep... And a maid apparently lol. I just woke up an hour ago after being in bed almost 10 hours and I feel as if I only slept 5 hours.

You slept FIVE WHOLE HOURS? **grin** Mine never let me sleep even that long. I can (and do) do fine on three hours at a time but the hourly wakeups were a grind. They passed. This will pass for you. But for the time being, survival mode. If you don't need it to ensure continued breathing, it'll wait.

Mrs.Pedro
by Bronze Member on May. 26, 2014 at 3:56 AM
This had been going on for over a month... Started when he was almost 2 months and got progressively worse until now and he will be 4 months come June 13th. That seems too long to be a growth spurt.

Quoting jessi2girls:

growth spurt, babies nurse more when they go through them.. it's common.

But it will pass. 

Mrs.Pedro
by Bronze Member on May. 26, 2014 at 4:03 AM
I know it won't be forever(hopefully). My first EBF baby was fussy from day 2 and persisted that way until he was 5 months old... It got a little better with melt downs, but he didn't really STOP fussing for no reason(that I could find) until he got table foods at 8 months almost. I just hope it doesn't take this one another 2 months to calm down.

Quoting audmom1218: Hugs mama. This is a huge developmental milestone and has much more to do with baby's growth (brain development) than feeding method. Everything you mentioned sounds so familiar to me and I can absolutely promise you this... It doesn't last forever! It does suck! Especially the sleep deprivation! But it does get easier! This article may help! I noticed whenever dd started to have bad sleeping spells I would offer breast more frequently during the day which helped her tank up for later. Also we had to start nursing in a quiet dark room around 4 months to stretch out the nursing sessions. Good luck mama! You're stronger than you realize'.

http://www.naturalchild.org/guest/claire_niala.html





Why African Babies Don't Cry:
An African Perspective

by Claire Niala
I was born and grew up in Kenya & Cote d'Ivoire. Then from the age of fifteen I lived in the UK. However, I always knew that I wanted to raise my children (whenever I had them) at home in Kenya. And yes, I assumed I was going to have them. I am a modern African woman with two university degrees and I am a fourth generation working woman - but when it comes to children, I am typically African. The assumption remains that you are not complete without them; children are a blessing it would be crazy to avoid. Actually the question does not even arise.

I started my pregnancy in the UK. The urge to deliver at home was so strong that I sold my practice, setup a new business and moved house / country within five months of finding out I was pregnant. I did what most expectant mothers in the UK do - I read voraciously: Our Babies, Ourselves, Unconditional Parenting, anything by the Searses - the list goes on. (My grandmother later commented that babies don't read books - and really all I needed to do was "read" my baby). Everything I read said that African babies cried less than European babies. I was intrigued as to why.

When I went home I observed. I looked out for mothers and babies and they were everywhere (though not very young African ones - those under six weeks were mainly at home). The first thing I noticed is that despite their ubiquitousness it is actually quite difficult to actually "see" a Kenyan baby. They are usually incredibly well wrapped up before being carried or strapped onto their mother (sometimes father).

Even older babies already strapped onto a back are then further protected from the elements by a large blanket. You would be lucky to catch a limb, never mind an eye or nose. It is almost a womb-like replication in the wrapping. The babies are literally cocooned from the stresses of the outside world into which they are entering.

All I needed to do
was "read" my baby.
My second observation was a cultural one. In the UK it was understood that babies cry - in Kenya it was quite the opposite. The understanding is that babies don't cry. If they do - something is horribly wrong and must be done to rectify it immediately. My English sister-in-law summarized it well. "People here" she said "really don't like babies crying, do they?"

For my grandmother
it was simple - nyonyo! It all made much more sense when I finally delivered and my grandmother came from the village to visit. As it happened - my baby did cry a fair amount, and exasperated and tired, I forgot everything I had ever read and sometimes joined in the crying too. Yet for my grandmother it was simple - nyonyo (breastfeed her!). It was her answer to every single peep.
There were times when it was a wet nappy, or the fact that I had put her down, or that she needed burping that was the problem, but mainly she just wanted to be at the breast - it didn't really matter whether she was feeding or just having a comfort moment. I was already wearing her most of the time and co-sleeping with her, so this was a natural extension to what we were doing.

I suddenly learned the not-so-difficult secret as to the joyful silence of African babies. It was a simple needs-met symbiosis that required a total suspension of ideas of "what should be happening" and an embracing of what was actually going on in that moment. The bottom line was that my baby fed a lot - far more than I had ever read about anywhere and at least five times as much as some of the stricter feeding schedules I had heard about.

At about four months, when a lot of urban mothers start to introduce solids as previous guidelines had recommended, my daughter returned to newborn style hourly breastfeeding. She needed hourly feeds and this was a total shock. Over the past four months the time between feeds had slowly started to increase. I had even started to treat the odd patient without my breasts leaking or my daughter's nanny interrupting the session to let me know my daughter needed a feed.

Most of the mothers in my mother and baby group had duly started to introduce baby rice (to stretch the feeds) and all the professionals involved in our children's lives - pediatricians, even doulas, said that this was OK. Mothers needed rest too, we had done amazingly to get to four months exclusive breastfeeding, and they said our babies would be fine. Something didn't ring true for me and even when I tried (half-heartedly) to mix some pawpaw (the traditional weaning food in Kenya) with expressed milk and offered it to my daughter - she was having none of it.

So I called my grandmother. She laughed and asked if I had been reading books again. She carefully explained how breastfeeding was anything but linear. "She'll tell you when she's ready for food - and her body will too." "What will I do until then?" I was eager to know. "You do what you did before, regular nyonyo". So my life slowed down to what felt like a standstill again. While many of my contemporaries marveled at how their children were sleeping longer now that they had introduced the baby rice, and were even venturing to other foods, I was waking hourly or every two hours with my daughter and telling patients that the return to work wasn't panning out quite as I had planned. She'll tell you when
she's ready for food.
I soon found that quite unwittingly I was turning into an informal support service for other urban mothers. My phone number was doing the round and many times while I was feeding my baby I would hear myself uttering the words, "Yes, just keep feeding him/ her." "Yes, even if you have just fed them" "Yes, you might not even manage to get out of your pajamas today" "Yes, you still need to eat and drink like a horse" "No, now might not be the time to consider going back to work if you can afford not to". "It will get easier". I had to just trust this last one as it hadn't gotten easier for me - yet.

A week or so before my daughter turned five months we traveled to the UK for a wedding and for her to meet family and friends. Especially because I had very few other demands, I kept up her feeding schedule easily. Despite the disconcerted looks of many strangers as I fed my daughter in many varied public places (most designated breastfeeding rooms were in rest rooms which I just could not bring myself to use), we carried on.

At the wedding, the people whose table we sat at noted, "She is such an easy baby - though she does feed a lot". I kept my silence, then another lady commented, "Though I did read somewhere that African babies don't cry much." I could not help but laugh.

My grandmother's gentle wisdom:

Offer the breast every single moment that your baby is upset - even if you have just fed her.
Co-sleep. Many times you can feed your baby before they are fully awake, which will allow them to go back to sleep easier and get you more rest.
Always take a flask of warm water with bed to you at night to keep you hydrated and the milk flowing.
Make the feeding your priority (especially during growth spurts) and get everyone else around you to do as much as they can for you. There is very little that cannot wait.
Read your baby, not the books. Breastfeeding is not linear - it goes up and down (and also in circles). You are the expert on your baby's needs.


Mrs.Pedro
by Bronze Member on May. 26, 2014 at 4:29 AM
I know people say that bit every other baby I have met had been a happy baby... I thought I got lucky this time around and I guess I was wrong lol!

I had an oversupply, then at 7 weeks I was on the lead up to my first pp period. At that time I went from being able to give him one breast and he would burp then top off on the same side and burp then be content... He would either go to sleep or stay awake for awhile to be entertained until he was tired. His wet and dirty diaper output decreased significantly as well. So I assume that's when my supply finally evened out.

He used to stay awake almost all day then sleep at night. So I didn't worry too much about supply since I still kept an oversupply.

I can't sleep when baby sleeps... I've got two other kids and a husband that's gone 12 hours a day. At night I try to go to bed when he does, but I still usually don't because I try to spend time with my husband or the older boys are being difficult not sleeping.

I already do use paper plates and such since he was born to make it easier. Unfortunately I no longer eat microwave foods and very little out of a box, so cooking and prepping food is still a must. I'm not trying to have a spotless house, but just one that is clean enough I won't have food stuck to my feet and spilled drinks stuck to my floor and pee not all over my bathroom(thanks to two young boys lol). I can barely make myself and my older kids food before the baby is waking to be entertained and fed again. I eat maybe twice a day as a result.

I can't leave chores to my husband. He says he will do them but doesn't. For example I left him to remember the trash in his own(his only chore!), and it ended up being me taking 5 bags of trash down 4 flights. He gets better and then worse again after I talk to him about it. He's gone until 6-8pm so I can't really expect him to do much. With the summer coming he will be even more busy and has a course he will be out of town for for 2 or 3 weeks, and then at the end of summer he will be leaving the country for 7 weeks. By then the baby should be better... I hope lol.

I have maintenance, fire inspectors and drills whenever they see fit, so I try to keep the house at some level of cleanliness. Nothing fancy, just general upkeep so the floors aren't filthy and the bathrooms aren't filthy. I can't even get enough time to clean up the table and sweep after a meal lately.

I'm honestly not sure how much I slept lol. I just remember getting woke up a bunch of times, and fighting to get the baby asleep a bunch of times and that he was waking once an hour for most of it when I got too woke up to fully go back to sleep. I can't function well without sleep, and I'm a super bitch to my kids as well.


Quoting gdiamante:

Quoting Mrs.Pedro: I had a feeling it would happen and it did... I went from having an awesome happy baby
Heh heh... those are the dangerous ones, you know! NEVER TRUST A HAPPY BABY! **grin** But let's see what's going on.
to a baby that fusses all the time and has meltdowns all the time. It started around 7/8 weeks when my supply dipped...
Can you explain what leads you to believe there was a dip?
He went from sleeping anywhere from 4-6 hours straight at night before needing to eat, to every 3 hours, and now back to every 1-2 hours after a 3 hour stretch in the beginning like he did between birth and 3 weeks old.
The current sleeping pattern is quite normal. Never get used to any sleep pattern because it will change CONSTANTLY. You WANT the waking; it's SIDS defense and a supply builder. Too much sleep can lead to Failure to Thrive.
He sleeps the first stretch in his crib in our room then comes to bed with me after he wakes up just so I don't have to sit up or get up because I'm so tired I was falling asleep sitting up.
PERFECT.
To top it off, when he does wake up in the middle of the night to nurse now he's difficult to put back to sleep... He wants to comfort nurse all night and I just can't do that.
Unfortunately babies are kind of self-centered here; as far as they are concerned THEY are the center of the universe. Not much to do to change this; it's something that's outgrown. What you CAN do is sleep when baby sleeps as much as possible and jettison things that keep you from doing so wherever possible. Survival mode: Do that which is needed to live and nothing more. 
He used to nurse until he started falling asleep then I just put him down in the bed next to me and he went to sleep... Now I have to fight with him to take his paci or he will just cry. Now during the day it's hard to get him to sleep more than half an hour and we have 3-4 meltdowns everyday where he's inconsolable... After awhile of it he just falls asleep in our arms for 20/30 minutes and wakes up again. It's getting to the point I can't get anything done during the day between him and his big brothers(big brothers are loud so he doesn't sleep well unless I'm holding him). I can finally wear him, but I can't really do any cleaning that way...
Forget about cleaning. Seriously. No one worth being ever had "World's Greatest Housekeeper" on her tombstone. Unless it's an acutal health hazard, it will wait. Paper plates. Plastic forks. Not as ecologically friendly, I know, but we're talking survival mode.
I can't see around him enough and it jars him too much. It also hurts my back to lean over so I can see with him on me. I'm getting exhausted and frustrated. My house is a mess, because I'm so tired and never have enough time to even put the dishes in the dishwasher.
Is dad helping? He only gets a pass for one of three reasons: He's not present in the home ever due to death or deployment, he's a first responder, or he makes his living handling heavy equipment. Otherwise, he needs to help. And again, paper and plastic. Make your next load of dishes the last one you do for the next month or so.
I kinda wish I could go back to still having an oversupply just to see if he would go back to sleeping well lol. I'm going to try to put him back in his bed instead of bringing him into bed with me... Either way that's something that needs to be done, but I'm really hoping it will make him less likely to wake for nursing so often. I thought I got lucky with a great sleeper and he's just doing what my other EBF baby did. I hope this isn't an omen of what's to come like with my other EBF baby... My other had issues with gaining weight after my supply dipped from leveling out. First from gaining slowly, to not gaining, and then losing weight until I had to start feeding him table food at 7.5 months on doctor's orders after being hospitalized for FTT. His diaper count has gone down a lot, but still meeting the expected amount of wets. I guess only time will tell, and I can praise the day he starts taking solids and is back to being happy again like my other kiddo.

I just really need some uninterrupted sleep... And a maid apparently lol. I just woke up an hour ago after being in bed almost 10 hours and I feel as if I only slept 5 hours.

You slept FIVE WHOLE HOURS? **grin** Mine never let me sleep even that long. I can (and do) do fine on three hours at a time but the hourly wakeups were a grind. They passed. This will pass for you. But for the time being, survival mode. If you don't need it to ensure continued breathing, it'll wait.

MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on May. 26, 2014 at 6:25 AM
This is normal behavior. He is supposed to wake and nurse often, as well as comfort nurse during the night. This is how he builds your supply. Waking at night is also protection against SIDS. Were your babies ever checked for lip or tongue ties?
Mrs.Pedro
by Bronze Member on May. 26, 2014 at 7:47 AM
I can't handle comfort nursing so he gets a paci when he starts falling asleep on the boob. That's the only time he comfort nurses- when falling asleep or in his sleep. I don't mind waking up every two hours but every hour is too much to handle especially when it takes me 5 minutes or more to get him to take the paci and go back to sleep. I could handle all that a lot better if I could at least get my house in a somewhat clean shape so I could at least sit and relax between feeding everybody and cleaning up after meals.

None of them have ever been checked for tongue tie by professionals, but I know what to look for. They both had/have stretchy upper lip ties. I get sore if he nurses more often... Today has been especially bad so my nipples have been more sore like when he was just born. But other than times like this I have no issues with pain. I haven't noticed any issues with transference... It's more like he gets pissed that it's not coming out fast enough(during the day- at night he just nurses without fuss), especially after the let down subsides. He will start wiggling then popping on and off, and I used to take that as his need to burp... But now he just screams bloody murder if I try to burp him instead of switching him to the other side and he no longer burps for me.


Quoting MusherMaggie: This is normal behavior. He is supposed to wake and nurse often, as well as comfort nurse during the night. This is how he builds your supply. Waking at night is also protection against SIDS. Were your babies ever checked for lip or tongue ties?
K8wizzo
by Kate on May. 26, 2014 at 7:48 AM
Has he been checked for ties? How older are your older boys? I taught mine to vaccum at 2 and use a broom and mop (libman freedom mop or swiffer wetjet) at 3. They knew how to wipe up spilled water at 1.5 and at 3 could use wipes to clean the bathroom, light switches, doorknobs, etc. When they were 2-3 we used a sticker chart for chores but now they get paid a dime for each one. Have them help out with the cleaning or with entertaining the baby while you clean or cook.
MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on May. 26, 2014 at 8:46 AM
Lip ties usually mean deep posterior tongue ties as well. He would nurse better and more efficiently if they were clipped. We have a wonderful section on ties in our resources sticky with pictures, links and a list of reputable providers by state who revise ties.
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