Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

Tips and Tricks...PLEASE!

Posted by on Jun. 27, 2014 at 8:47 AM
  • 25 Replies

I have been hearing so often from so many women on how they "couldn't" breastfeed. My mom being one of them. It scares me to the point now that I am having anxiety about not being able to solely breastfeed. 

I am almost 20 weeks, already got a electric double pump (Medela) for when I start back at work. I am dead set on doing this...just need help to make sure it goes smoothly.

What tips can you give me...things I can even start doing now to make sure I am able to breastfeed! Did you have any trouble at first but was able to later on?

Thanks!

by on Jun. 27, 2014 at 8:47 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
elena170
by on Jun. 27, 2014 at 8:53 AM

Usually every hospital has a LaLeche specialist. Mine had a nickname "the nipple Nazi" lol. She helped me a lot with helping the baby latch, telling me things I could do to increase the milk supply. I'd really recommend you ask your Dr to recommend a breastfeeding specialist, if you are so concerned about it. Good luck and don't stress out about it too much!

MusherMaggie
by Platinum Member on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:04 AM
Educate yourself. Read posts here and on Kellymom.com. Two books: "So That's What They're For" by Janet Tamaro and "The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding" from La Leche League. Go to LLLI.ORG and see if there is a group that meets near you. Do not take advice from anyone, including medical professionals, who have not breastfed at least a year. Google "Find an IBCLC" (Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant). Almost anyone can call themselves a "lactation consultant"; an IBCLC has thousands of hours of study and practical experience in all sorts of breastfeeding circumstances. Also, look up the section on lip and tongue ties in the resources sticky. Ties seem to be very common, can have a significant effect on breastfeeding, are easily fixed but few medical professionals are aware of this.

Once your baby is born, allow nothing in her mouth except your nipple. Be aware that up to twelve percent weight loss is normal, especially if you have IV fluids. A breastfed baby can take up to a month to regain birth weight. Keep baby skin-to-skin with you as much as possible, and nurse at every wiggle.

Diaper count is your true indicator of what she's getting. The first week, you want one diaper per day of life, with at least two quarter sized poops per 24 hours. By the end of the week, a minimum of six diapers in twenty four hours with poopy or extra wet counting as two diapers.

You make a "liquid gold" called colostrum before your "mature milk" comes in. Colostrum is jam-packed with nutrients and antibodies. It's also very laxative which helps them pass the tarry dark meconium. It's also the best thing for jaundice if that happens.

Above all, relax, and take things a day at a time! :-)
hip2it
by Bronze Member on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:23 AM
Be stubborn. My baby had ties and the first two weeks were hell before the revision. I simply refused to quit no matter what came at me.
gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:29 AM
1 mom liked this

All of the above. And know this: The average American newborn is the single most UNpleasant thing on the planet; it's a demanding, noisy, sometimes messy and smelly bundle of NEED, not of joy. Know why we bond? So we don't EAT 'em out of sheer frustration.

If you've been reading baby mags with nice soft pictures of beautiful nurseries: BURN them. Really. They are just a marketer's fantasy, nothing to do with reality.

Spend three times as much time on learning about infant feeding and care as you do on the layette and the nursery. When baby arrives, he cares about one thing and one thing only: Getting fed. You could dress him in the same plain white onesie every day, he wouldn't care. You could do his room in Winnie the Pooh or World of Warcraft; he won't care! (Especially since he won't really be able to focus on the walls for weeks!)

Here's a scary thought for you: Read this group for just ONE WEEK and you'll have more breastfeeding education than your doctor got in med school. That's why we tell you to get educated; you have to be your own resource much of the time.

Good for you for coming in and getting started early!

mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:33 AM
1 mom liked this
My mother and everyone I know has a "couldn't breastfeed" story. For my baby shower my mom got me a case of lactose free formula and dozens of bottles. My family joked that I'd never be able to breastfeed because I "didn't have boobs". Well, my first breastfed to 15 months. At one point he was so chubby my mom told me I must be overfeeding him and he'd never crawl or walk. (So by my mom I was going to screw up starving him, or overfeeding him.) My next two babies to 24 months and my youngest to 39 months. All without any of that formula or any of those bottles.

The single most important factor I attribute to my success is my hospital's breastfeeding moms support group, which met 3 days a week. And i went 3 days a week for Over 6 months. Having the help and just companionship of others trying to do the same thing was invaluable.
Wally812
by New Member on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:33 AM

I have been reading, and talking to people who have successfully breastfed. So much as a few people have offered to grab my boob and show me how its done! lol I just don't understand why so many women have difficulties with producing milk...or so they say. Does it take a while for your milk to fully come in? I think I will buy a couple books as well, sometimes they are much easier to read then the internet. 

Quoting gdiamante:

All of the above. And know this: The average American newborn is the single most UNpleasant thing on the planet; it's a demanding, noisy, sometimes messy and smelly bundle of NEED, not of joy. Know why we bond? So we don't EAT 'em out of sheer frustration.

If you've been reading baby mags with nice soft pictures of beautiful nurseries: BURN them. Really. They are just a marketer's fantasy, nothing to do with reality.

Spend three times as much time on learning about infant feeding and care as you do on the layette and the nursery. When baby arrives, he cares about one thing and one thing only: Getting fed. You could dress him in the same plain white onesie every day, he wouldn't care. You could do his room in Winnie the Pooh or World of Warcraft; he won't care! (Especially since he won't really be able to focus on the walls for weeks!)

Here's a scary thought for you: Read this group for just ONE WEEK and you'll have more breastfeeding education than your doctor got in med school. That's why we tell you to get educated; you have to be your own resource much of the time.

Good for you for coming in and getting started early!


Wally812
by New Member on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:38 AM

As stupid as it sounds, I was worried bc my mom couldnt breastfeed that I wouldnt be able to. lol Thanks for the comment, at least that one doesn't worry me so much! How often were you feeding? I read everey two hours the baby should be fed or boobs should be pumped?

Quoting mostlymaydays: My mother and everyone I know has a "couldn't breastfeed" story. For my baby shower my mom got me a case of lactose free formula and dozens of bottles. My family joked that I'd never be able to breastfeed because I "didn't have boobs". Well, my first breastfed to 15 months. At one point he was so chubby my mom told me I must be overfeeding him and he'd never crawl or walk. (So by my mom I was going to screw up starving him, or overfeeding him.) My next two babies to 24 months and my youngest to 39 months. All without any of that formula or any of those bottles. The single most important factor I attribute to my success is my hospital's breastfeeding moms support group, which met 3 days a week. And i went 3 days a week for Over 6 months. Having the help and just companionship of others trying to do the same thing was invaluable.


gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:43 AM


Quoting Wally812:

I have been reading, and talking to people who have successfully breastfed. So much as a few people have offered to grab my boob and show me how its done! lol I just don't understand why so many women have difficulties with producing milk...or so they say.

It's more often "So they say" than actual difficulty. What I told you about "bundles of need?" Many women don't know this. They think baby is supposed to be this happy cooing sleeping creature, and when baby is NOT they blame their milk rather than their mistaken expectations.

Parenting is the TOUGHEST job you'll ever do. Not to be entered into buy anyone who doesn't want to spend more time aggravated than happy. **grin** (I have a teenager now; it never gets EASIER, just different types of hard as they grow. And yes, I am a cynic!)

I've been in groups like this since before my son was born, and my observation is that 99% of the women who think they don't make enough are making plenty but don't know how to judge it. The ONLY way to judge is the dipe count. Pump output matters not; there are women who can feed twins but not get ONE drop from the best pump. Infant attitude doesn't tell you anything; they're programmed to make you think they're always starving. (Sort of like my dog. I can feed her in the morning, but the instant Dad comes into the kitchen she's begging for food again!)

Does it take a while for your milk to fully come in?

Up to six days. Till then, baby gets colostrum.

Typical newborn weight pattern: Week one, loss of up to 10-12% of birth weight (the higher range for c-sections/births with lots of IV fluids). Week two, regain of at least four ounces from lowest weight (and lowest weight doesn't necessarily mean discharge weight). From week two on, you're looking for at least four ounces per week gained.

I think I will buy a couple books as well, sometimes they are much easier to read then the internet. 

And sometimes easier to have on hand in the hospital.

mostlymaydays
by Group Mod-Stacy on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:44 AM
With my first my milk came in around day 4/5. That's normal. Up until that point their tummy is the size of a marble and needs nothing more than colostrum. They sure don't need 2 ounce bottles of pre made formula. They lose weight. Normal. After the second week they start to put weight on, around 4 ounces or more, often not enough to get back up to birth weight. Normal. BUT you've got a pediatrician at the 2 week appointment who has seen babies force fed 2 ounce bottles of formula from birth and of course they are seeing big weight gains so they panic the breastfeeding mom with unrealistic and inaccurate expectations and mom starts to question herself and doctor makes formula look like a sure way to measure amount going in. *Almost always* moms who hit big trouble are handed the trouble by a doctor (or nurse, dentist, pharmacist, friend or mother in law) because at some point we started measuring breastfeeding against formula instead of the other way around. :-/

Quoting Wally812:

I have been reading, and talking to people who have successfully breastfed. So much as a few people have offered to grab my boob and show me how its done! lol I just don't understand why so many women have difficulties with producing milk...or so they say. Does it take a while for your milk to fully come in? I think I will buy a couple books as well, sometimes they are much easier to read then the internet. 

Quoting gdiamante:

All of the above. And know this: The average American newborn is the single most UNpleasant thing on the planet; it's a demanding, noisy, sometimes messy and smelly bundle of NEED, not of joy. Know why we bond? So we don't EAT 'em out of sheer frustration.

If you've been reading baby mags with nice soft pictures of beautiful nurseries: BURN them. Really. They are just a marketer's fantasy, nothing to do with reality.

Spend three times as much time on learning about infant feeding and care as you do on the layette and the nursery. When baby arrives, he cares about one thing and one thing only: Getting fed. You could dress him in the same plain white onesie every day, he wouldn't care. You could do his room in Winnie the Pooh or World of Warcraft; he won't care! (Especially since he won't really be able to focus on the walls for weeks!)

Here's a scary thought for you: Read this group for just ONE WEEK and you'll have more breastfeeding education than your doctor got in med school. That's why we tell you to get educated; you have to be your own resource much of the time.

Good for you for coming in and getting started early!

gdiamante
by Group Mod - Gina on Jun. 27, 2014 at 9:46 AM


Quoting Wally812:

As stupid as it sounds, I was worried bc my mom couldnt breastfeed that I wouldnt be able to. lol

It doesn't sound stupid at all. We hear that a lot. Sadly, many of our mothers were sabotaged and probably could have done fine had the medical profession not gotten in the way.

Thanks for the comment, at least that one doesn't worry me so much! How often were you feeding? I read everey two hours the baby should be fed or boobs should be pumped?

Feed ON DEMAND. No clocks. When baby wiggles, breast. Baby coughs, breast. The nipple is the answer to all!

Don't bother to pump immediately. Two weeks before you go back to work will be soon enough. When you do start, once a day in the morning would be fine. You don't need a big stash; indeed, big stashes can cause problems because then caregivers can overfeed. 1 - 1.25 ounces per hour of separation, servings of about 2-3 ounces. 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)