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Advice on constipation please

Posted by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:25 PM
  • 12 Replies

 I know this is a breastfeeding group(I'm still nursing my 18 month old son) but this is for my sister. My almost 3 week old nephew is constipated and she needs advice on how to help him. He is drinking 4 oz of formula right now and her dr told her to make a 4 oz bottle of formula and then add another oz of water(so it's a 5 oz bottle but only 4 oz is formula). I didn't think that was right but I never formula fed my kids at this age(my 3 older kids were 6-8 months before they weaned to formula) so I'm lost. Please help!!!!

by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:25 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Analugojana
by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:32 PM

NO WAY! Watering down is very dangerous. It can throw off electrolyte balance. She might need to change formula if that one is constipating or, even better, look into donor breast milk is she doesn't want to bf hersef (at 3 weeks pp relactation is very possible). 

MusherMaggie
by Ruby Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:36 PM
At three weeks, it wouldn't take long to bring her milk back in. That, and I would recommend a new pediatrician.
Mom2Just1
by Silver Member on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:44 PM
No! Change peds. We had a baby die in my town because their parents watered down formula. Change of formula or relactating.
jplumb
by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:49 PM

 She tried to nurse but she couldn't get him to latch. She also has flat nipples and the shields didn't work(wished I lived near her so I could have helped, though I'm not a LC). She is completely dry and had very little milk come in(at least that is what she said because she was going to pump and bottle feed too). She also isn't seeing a pediatrician but a family dr so they don't go to multiple offices(that was her and her fiance's decision and I didn't want to step on any toes suggesting they see a ped).

mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:50 PM
Why in all that is holy would a dr recommend watering down formula?!?! And isn't 5 oz a pretty big bottle for a tiny 3 week old, like double what a 3 week old should be drinking? I agree with the others, relactation or new formula. And DEFINITELY a new pediatrician who is less likely to dispense potential FATAL advice.
mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:54 PM
Shields aren't for flat nipples but for wounded nipples. Breast shells are for flat nipples. Or a Latch Assist. Many insurance plans now cover sessions with lactation consultants and she's no where near being hopeless about her chances of breastfeeding. Seriously, watering down formula has had FATAL consequences. These stories make the news. I can not believe a doctor thinks that's a good idea.

Quoting jplumb:

 She tried to nurse but she couldn't get him to latch. She also has flat nipples and the shields didn't work(wished I lived near her so I could have helped, though I'm not a LC). She is completely dry and had very little milk come in(at least that is what she said because she was going to pump and bottle feed too). She also isn't seeing a pediatrician but a family dr so they don't go to multiple offices(that was her and her fiance's decision and I didn't want to step on any toes suggesting they see a ped).

mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:58 PM
1 mom liked this
Water Intoxication

Diluted infant formula contains more water than it should, and while older children and adults usually don't have to worry about drinking too much water, parents do need to monitor the water intake of newborns and very young babies. Babies get all of the water they need from properly mixed formula or breast milk, and giving your little one more than that can lead to water intoxication, according to a 2008 article published in "Scientific American." When it happens, a baby's sodium level drops dramatically, which can lead to seizures, brain damage, coma and death. Symptoms of water intoxication include confusion, drowsiness, twitching, poor breathing and vomiting, reports the Children's Hospital of St. Louis. If your baby displays any of these symptoms, seek medical attention immediately.



http://everydaylife.globalpost.com/dangers-diluted-baby-formula-3365.html
jplumb
by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 1:59 PM

 I meant shells but typed shields. Sorry about that!! She doesn't have a lot of money to spend and I'm honestly not sure how her insurance works with getting a lactation consultant. I was thinking that 4 oz was too much to feed him but I wasn't sure. How much should he be eating? He is 7 lbs 10 oz(that is what he was on Monday at his 2 week appointment).

Quoting mostlymaydays: Shields aren't for flat nipples but for wounded nipples. Breast shells are for flat nipples. Or a Latch Assist. Many insurance plans now cover sessions with lactation consultants and she's no where near being hopeless about her chances of breastfeeding. Seriously, watering down formula has had FATAL consequences. These stories make the news. I can not believe a doctor thinks that's a good idea.
Quoting jplumb:

 She tried to nurse but she couldn't get him to latch. She also has flat nipples and the shields didn't work(wished I lived near her so I could have helped, though I'm not a LC). She is completely dry and had very little milk come in(at least that is what she said because she was going to pump and bottle feed too). She also isn't seeing a pediatrician but a family dr so they don't go to multiple offices(that was her and her fiance's decision and I didn't want to step on any toes suggesting they see a ped).

 

Analugojana
by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 2:54 PM

She doesn't necessarily need an IBCLC but she needs a LOT of determination to relactate. She would need to pump with a good double electric pump every 2 hours during the day and every 3 at night. Then it is possible to bring baby back to breast, even at 3 weeks. But it kinda sounds like she's not that determined. Correct me if I'm wrong.

I'd say she should try to find a donor mom on Facebook. There are two groups: Human Milk 4 Human Babies and Eats on Feets. I donated on the first for a good few months. She may be able to find a donor mom in her area.

Quoting jplumb:

 I meant shells but typed shields. Sorry about that!! She doesn't have a lot of money to spend and I'm honestly not sure how her insurance works with getting a lactation consultant. I was thinking that 4 oz was too much to feed him but I wasn't sure. How much should he be eating? He is 7 lbs 10 oz(that is what he was on Monday at his 2 week appointment).

Quoting mostlymaydays: Shields aren't for flat nipples but for wounded nipples. Breast shells are for flat nipples. Or a Latch Assist. Many insurance plans now cover sessions with lactation consultants and she's no where near being hopeless about her chances of breastfeeding. Seriously, watering down formula has had FATAL consequences. These stories make the news. I can not believe a doctor thinks that's a good idea.
Quoting jplumb:

 She tried to nurse but she couldn't get him to latch. She also has flat nipples and the shields didn't work(wished I lived near her so I could have helped, though I'm not a LC). She is completely dry and had very little milk come in(at least that is what she said because she was going to pump and bottle feed too). She also isn't seeing a pediatrician but a family dr so they don't go to multiple offices(that was her and her fiance's decision and I didn't want to step on any toes suggesting they see a ped).

 


Analugojana
by on Jul. 25, 2014 at 2:55 PM

At 3 weeks? About 2-2.5 ounces. 

Quoting jplumb:

 I meant shells but typed shields. Sorry about that!! She doesn't have a lot of money to spend and I'm honestly not sure how her insurance works with getting a lactation consultant. I was thinking that 4 oz was too much to feed him but I wasn't sure. How much should he be eating? He is 7 lbs 10 oz(that is what he was on Monday at his 2 week appointment).

Quoting mostlymaydays: Shields aren't for flat nipples but for wounded nipples. Breast shells are for flat nipples. Or a Latch Assist. Many insurance plans now cover sessions with lactation consultants and she's no where near being hopeless about her chances of breastfeeding. Seriously, watering down formula has had FATAL consequences. These stories make the news. I can not believe a doctor thinks that's a good idea.
Quoting jplumb:

 She tried to nurse but she couldn't get him to latch. She also has flat nipples and the shields didn't work(wished I lived near her so I could have helped, though I'm not a LC). She is completely dry and had very little milk come in(at least that is what she said because she was going to pump and bottle feed too). She also isn't seeing a pediatrician but a family dr so they don't go to multiple offices(that was her and her fiance's decision and I didn't want to step on any toes suggesting they see a ped).

 


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