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Breastfeeding Moms Breastfeeding Moms

A sincere question about night nursing

Posted by on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:04 AM
  • 60 Replies
1 mom liked this
Another mom posted a question "how did you night wean" in regards to her 10 1/2 month old. Most everyone told her she can't night wean until 1 year. Myself and 1 other person answered her question and explained how we night weaned our 3 children between the ages of 7 and 10 months.
I was told by my Dr. As well as the kid's pediatrician that it is not nutritionally necessary for babies over 6 months to nurse at night and that it is a comfort mechanism. In fact my first dd began sleeping through the night all on her own. I never even sleep trained her.
Here is my question, and the is a sincere question. I could do without the condescension and shaming. No mom needs to be berated when they are seeking advice. That isn't what this forum is for. I am pregnant with #4 and planned to treat this baby as all of my others... We usually stop Co sleeping and start night weaning around 7 months or so. I have spent the last day searching online and I can't find anything that backs up what everyone is saying about how breastfed babies must nurse on demand until 1 or they may fail to thrive. In fact everything I have found supports what our Dr's. Say. Can some one point me to the resources where you get this information? I even looked at some stuff about Dr. Gordon but I couldn't find any evidence to counter- just what he recommended. Please remember that this is a real question. I am going to have another baby and I can't find the answers I am looking for. I want resources too, please, not just advice.
by on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:04 AM
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Replies (1-10):
polkaspots
by Gold Member on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:10 AM
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I don't have any resources. I just don't agree with not giving milk to a crying baby. I night weaned my kids between 15-18 months old with a problem. I've never considered not feeding a crying baby. I just don't see not drinking through the night as progress, or something to strive for.
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LittleRed80
by Bronze Member on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:16 AM
1 mom liked this
That's really not helpful at all. I already said that my oldest slept through on her own. She wasn't crying she was sleeping. When I went to the Dr I wanted to know if I should be waking her up to nurse. That's when he said it wasn't necessary, but according to everyone on here, they say it is. I want to know where that information comes from.

Quoting polkaspots: I don't have any resources. I just don't agree with not giving milk to a crying baby. I night weaned my kids between 15-18 months old with a problem. I've never considered not feeding a crying baby. I just don't see not drinking through the night as progress, or something to strive for.
Serabeth06
by on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:18 AM

I don't have any resources or an opinion on it either way. I've never researched it, it wasn't a method I was interested in using, but here's a bump for you.

LittleRed80
by Bronze Member on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:20 AM
1 mom liked this
Thanks.

Quoting Serabeth06:

I don't have any resources or an opinion on it either way. I've never researched it, it wasn't a method I was interested in using, but here's a bump for you.

MissSarah04
by Sarah on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:21 AM
I also don't have resources but I am a firm believer that one size does not fit all when it comes to our babies. Some babies may sleep through the night early and nurse plenty during the day and be wonderfully healthy. Others will wake up hungry during the night no matter what you do.

I try to compare it to adults. Some wake up thirsty and keep water by the bed like me. Others don't.
amandaut99
by Member on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:23 AM
1 mom liked this

 I don't think anyone said you should wake a sleeping baby to nurse. The responses had to do with feeding a baby less than a year old on demand. That means when they demand it, not waking them up to feed them if they are not demanding it. I nursed my son until he was 17 months old and he slept through the night early on (probably around 6 months or so). I am still nursing my daughter who just turned a year old and she wakes up 1-2 times per night to nurse. Each baby is different. Perhaps what you are looking for is the fact that breast milk or formula is supposed to be the primary source of nutrition for the first year of life. Nursing on demand is a way to make sure that you are providing what the baby needs during that time. Just my two cents.

Quoting LittleRed80: That's really not helpful at all. I already said that my oldest slept through on her own. She wasn't crying she was sleeping. When I went to the Dr I wanted to know if I should be waking her up to nurse. That's when he said it wasn't necessary, but according to everyone on here, they say it is. I want to know where that information comes from.
Quoting polkaspots: I don't have any resources. I just don't agree with not giving milk to a crying baby. I night weaned my kids between 15-18 months old with a problem. I've never considered not feeding a crying baby. I just don't see not drinking through the night as progress, or something to strive for.

 

Cruz-s-mommy
by Amanda on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:24 AM
What we are saying is not to deny milk to a baby who wakes up crying /asking for it, a baby who STTN of their own will is completely different. I have read this recommendation a few places, but I don't have them on hand, perhaps kellymom.com was one, but I will check my resources and reply again after I finish lunch and get my boys down for naps (like that will really happen, lol)

Quoting LittleRed80: That's really not helpful at all. I already said that my oldest slept through on her own. She wasn't crying she was sleeping. When I went to the Dr I wanted to know if I should be waking her up to nurse. That's when he said it wasn't necessary, but according to everyone on here, they say it is. I want to know where that information comes from.
Quoting polkaspots: I don't have any resources. I just don't agree with not giving milk to a crying baby. I night weaned my kids between 15-18 months old with a problem. I've never considered not feeding a crying baby. I just don't see not drinking through the night as progress, or something to strive for.
LittleRed80
by Bronze Member on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:25 AM
2 moms liked this
That makes sense. Actually some of the stuff I have read that sort of backs up the consensus on here says that if night weaning isn't going well, you should stop because baby isn't ready. It was really easy with all of my kids though so I didn't think much about it.

Quoting MissSarah04: I also don't have resources but I am a firm believer that one size does not fit all when it comes to our babies. Some babies may sleep through the night early and nurse plenty during the day and be wonderfully healthy. Others will wake up hungry during the night no matter what you do.

I try to compare it to adults. Some wake up thirsty and keep water by the bed like me. Others don't.
polkaspots
by Gold Member on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:26 AM
I wasn't directing that at you. I'm sorry it came off that way. Babies sleeping through the night on their own is completely different than babies waking up and not being fed. It's not necessary to wake a child that doesn't have failure to thrive symptoms. That doesn't mean that babies don't have to eat at night. It just means that the specific baby in question doesn't need to drink at night.
I take issue with people who night wean small babies that are still waking and asking for milk. According to your post you don't fall into that category.


Quoting LittleRed80: That's really not helpful at all. I already said that my oldest slept through on her own. She wasn't crying she was sleeping. When I went to the Dr I wanted to know if I should be waking her up to nurse. That's when he said it wasn't necessary, but according to everyone on here, they say it is. I want to know where that information comes from.

Quoting polkaspots: I don't have any resources. I just don't agree with not giving milk to a crying baby. I night weaned my kids between 15-18 months old with a problem. I've never considered not feeding a crying baby. I just don't see not drinking through the night as progress, or something to strive for.
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LittleRed80
by Bronze Member on Aug. 21, 2014 at 11:33 AM
This makes sense, but don't you think there is a difference between a baby who wakes up crying because they are hungry from a baby who whines because your booby is right next to them and they want to suckle all night? Most babies have different cues for different things. None of my children have ever been underweight and even the 2 that I did sleep train were also sleeping through the night without crying after 1-2 days. Someone on here suggested it was because they had given up on getting fed not because they weren't hungry. Do you think that's really true?

Quoting Cruz-s-mommy: What we are saying is not to deny milk to a baby who wakes up crying /asking for it, a baby who STTN of their own will is completely different. I have read this recommendation a few places, but I don't have them on hand, perhaps kellymom.com was one, but I will check my resources and reply again after I finish lunch and get my boys down for naps (like that will really happen, lol)

Quoting LittleRed80: That's really not helpful at all. I already said that my oldest slept through on her own. She wasn't crying she was sleeping. When I went to the Dr I wanted to know if I should be waking her up to nurse. That's when he said it wasn't necessary, but according to everyone on here, they say it is. I want to know where that information comes from.
Quoting polkaspots: I don't have any resources. I just don't agree with not giving milk to a crying baby. I night weaned my kids between 15-18 months old with a problem. I've never considered not feeding a crying baby. I just don't see not drinking through the night as progress, or something to strive for.
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