Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

I just want...

Posted by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 10:56 AM
  • 37 Replies

Mobile Photo

To produce enough to save to be able to go and do things out of the house without the babies :( I pumped for 20 mins from both breasts, 40 mins total and this is what I got 😒
2 oz from the right
1oz from the left
It's been 6 hours since I've nursed...

Why is this happening??? I know babies are getting enough but I cannot get anything to leave the house when their both eating 4+oz at 1 feeding :/
by on Jun. 2, 2015 at 10:56 AM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
LoveMyBug2013
by Bronze Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 12:15 PM

I don't have twins, but generally each breast produces half an ounce an hour.  Also, the pump is not indicative of supply.  And they are nursing so the pumping is extra.

I know that in order to have enough to go out (I generally only leave 2.5 ounces) I need to pump 2-3 times because the baby is taking what she needs and my supply is consistent with her needs, no extra.

shaddowchild
by Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 12:43 PM
Breast can only hold so much milk. Three ounces per pumping is normal. Next time try pumping twice or three times in that six hour period. It's about frequentcy of pumping not the time.
MusherMaggie
by Ruby Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 12:53 PM
Their tummies have been stretched. Four ounces at a time is too much. The rule of thumb is 1-1.25 ounces per hour of separation. Paced bottlefeeding: use the slowest flow newborn nipple always, baby held in sitting position, burping after every ounce. Supply and demand; the more milk that is removed, by nursing or pumping, the more you'll make. Pump first thing every morning, before or after the first morning feeding. Waiting hours to pump or nurse actually reduces milk production. Think of your breasts as factories or faucets rather than storage units.

Margarett RBC Zavodnyteal ribbon

tasha_salazar
by Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 1:12 PM
Their 7 wks old & take 4oz formula bottles from 9pm-9am...their pediatrician says 4oz is great as long as their not spitting it all up after & they never do.

Quoting MusherMaggie: Their tummies have been stretched. Four ounces at a time is too much. The rule of thumb is 1-1.25 ounces per hour of separation. Paced bottlefeeding: use the slowest flow newborn nipple always, baby held in sitting position, burping after every ounce. Supply and demand; the more milk that is removed, by nursing or pumping, the more you'll make. Pump first thing every morning, before or after the first morning feeding. Waiting hours to pump or nurse actually reduces milk production. Think of your breasts as factories or faucets rather than storage units.
kajira
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 2:11 PM
1 mom liked this

Why are you giving formula and bottles instead of nursing?

You need to dump the formula and keep them on the breast as long as you can to get your supply up. 4oz bottles are WAY To much. If you keep giving formula from 9pm to 9am and don't breastfeed at night, you will kill your supply and end up weaning them completely fairly soon.

Formula OZ are also not the same as breastmilk.

Breastmilk has more calories per oz and changes to meet their growth needs, where-as formula stays the same.

KylersMom8-16-7
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 2:13 PM
That's pretty normal honestly, your body knows the difference between the pump and your babies.

Why aren't you nursing? Your babies are young right, so you need to nurse on demand to maintain supply.

You are also leaving too much so you're putting unneeded pressure on yourself.

Quoting tasha_salazar:

Mobile Photo

To produce enough to save to be able to go and do things out of the house without the babies :( I pumped for 20 mins from both breasts, 40 mins total and this is what I got 😒
2 oz from the right
1oz from the left
It's been 6 hours since I've nursed...

Why is this happening??? I know babies are getting enough but I cannot get anything to leave the house when their both eating 4+oz at 1 feeding :/
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
KylersMom8-16-7
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 2:14 PM
1 mom liked this
What is normal when it comes to pumping output and changes in pumping output?

It is typical for a mother who is breastfeeding full-time to be able to pump around 1/2 to 2 ounces total (for both breasts) per pumping session. Mothers who pump more milk per session may have an oversupply of milk, or may respond better than average to the pump, or may have been able to increase pump output with practice. Many mothers think that they should be able to pump 4-8 ounces per pumping session, but even 4 ounces is a rather large pumping output for a mom who is breastfeeding full-time.

It is not unusual to need to pump 2-3 times to get enough milk for one feeding for baby (remember that the pump cannot get as much milk as a baby who nurses effectively).

Many mothers are able to pump more milk per session when they are separated from baby or if they are exclusively pumping. Milk pumped when you are breastfeeding full-time is “extra” milk — over and beyond what baby needs. Don’t get discouraged if you are trying to build up a freezer stash when breastfeeding full time and don’t get much milk per pumping session — this is perfectly normal and expected.

It is very common to have more milk than baby needs in the early weeks, which regulates down to baby’s needs over the first few weeks or months. When your milk supply regulates (this change may occur either gradually or rather suddenly), it is normal for pumping output to decrease. For moms who have oversupply, this change often occurs later (6-9+ months postpartum rather than 6-12 weeks).

It is normal for pumping output to vary from session to session and day to day. Having an occasional low volume day is not unusual.

During a growth spurt, don’t be surprised if baby drinks more expressed milk than usual, making it harder for mom to provide enough expressed milk. Growth spurts are temporary – try increasing nursing and adding a pumping session or two until the growth spurt is over.

Menstruation or ovulation can result in a temporary drop in milk supply. You might also notice cyclical dips in milk supply before your period returns, as your body begins the return to fertility. Hormonal changes also cause milk supply to decrease during pregnancy.

Remember that the amount of milk that you pump is not a measure of the milk supply available to your baby at the breast!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
KylersMom8-16-7
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 2:15 PM
1 mom liked this
How much milk do babies need?

Many mothers wonder how much expressed breastmilk they need to have available if they are away from baby.

In exclusively breastfed babies, milk intake increases quickly during the first few weeks of life, then stays about the same between one and six months (though it likely increases short term during growth spurts). Current breastfeeding research does not indicate that breastmilk intake changes with baby’s age or weight between one and six months. After six months, breastmilk intake will continue at this same level until — sometime after six months, depending in baby’s intake from other foods — baby’s milk intake begins to decrease gradually (see below).

The research tells us that exclusively breastfed babies take in an average of 25 oz (750 mL) per day between the ages of 1 month and 6 months. Different babies take in different amounts of milk; a typical range of milk intakes is 19-30 oz per day (570-900 mL per day).

We can use this information to estimate the average amount of milk baby will need at a feeding:

Estimate the number of times that baby nurses per day (24 hours).
Then divide 25 oz by the number of nursings.
This gives you a “ballpark” figure for the amount of expressed milk your exclusively breastfed baby will need at one feeding.
Example: If baby usually nurses around 8 times per day, you can guess that baby might need around 3 ounces per feeding when mom is away. (25/8=3.1).
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
KylersMom8-16-7
by Silver Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 2:23 PM
3 moms liked this
I'm going to just be blunt and honest, please don't take it as an attack, but you are sabotaging your breastfeeding relationship, making unnecessary work for yourself, and overfeeding.

Pediatrician do NOT know much about breastfed babies or infant nutrition. They are trained as MDs, medical doctors, not nutritionist, dietitians, or lactation consultants.

How much breast milk do they get? Do they nurse at all?

Quoting tasha_salazar: Their 7 wks old & take 4oz formula bottles from 9pm-9am...their pediatrician says 4oz is great as long as their not spitting it all up after & they never do.

Quoting MusherMaggie: Their tummies have been stretched. Four ounces at a time is too much. The rule of thumb is 1-1.25 ounces per hour of separation. Paced bottlefeeding: use the slowest flow newborn nipple always, baby held in sitting position, burping after every ounce. Supply and demand; the more milk that is removed, by nursing or pumping, the more you'll make. Pump first thing every morning, before or after the first morning feeding. Waiting hours to pump or nurse actually reduces milk production. Think of your breasts as factories or faucets rather than storage units.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
tasha_salazar
by Member on Jun. 2, 2015 at 5:35 PM
1 mom liked this
They from 9am-9pm. I do the formula at night because I also have a 6 yr to tend to & my sisters 6 month old, while DH works nights, so when they get formula they sleep longer which allows me to do things such as clean, EAT, laundry, makes lunches, etc...I'm not doing it because I don't want to breastfeed, my 6yr old never latched so for both of these 2 to be breastfeeding is amazing to me! With no help and night and very little during the day when DH sleeps it's hard with twins! Esp when 1 gets done before the other and I have to keep nursing and somehow try to burp the other without pulling the other off?! Seriously how the hell do you do that?! My babies are the type that if they get pulled off, THEIR DONE, even if it's been 5 mins. And they never ever feed for longer than 15 mins...iI though it was supposed to be like 45 mins??? I don't have the extra money to go see a LC, idk wtf to do. I'm just gonna give up, I cannot breastfeed at night or nothing will ever get done and plus it's every 2 hours when I BF them...by the time I'm done with feeding, burping, and changing their ready to eat again. I was getting at most 2-3 hours of sleep when I BF through the night and not eating cause I took every chance throughout the day to sleep. I don't want to go back to that. Idk what to do :( I guess I'm just f**king up this whole thing

Quoting KylersMom8-16-7: I'm going to just be blunt and honest, please don't take it as an attack, but you are sabotaging your breastfeeding relationship, making unnecessary work for yourself, and overfeeding.

Pediatrician do NOT know much about breastfed babies or infant nutrition. They are trained as MDs, medical doctors, not nutritionist, dietitians, or lactation consultants.

How much breast milk do they get? Do they nurse at all?

Quoting tasha_salazar: Their 7 wks old & take 4oz formula bottles from 9pm-9am...their pediatrician says 4oz is great as long as their not spitting it all up after & they never do.

Quoting MusherMaggie: Their tummies have been stretched. Four ounces at a time is too much. The rule of thumb is 1-1.25 ounces per hour of separation. Paced bottlefeeding: use the slowest flow newborn nipple always, baby held in sitting position, burping after every ounce. Supply and demand; the more milk that is removed, by nursing or pumping, the more you'll make. Pump first thing every morning, before or after the first morning feeding. Waiting hours to pump or nurse actually reduces milk production. Think of your breasts as factories or faucets rather than storage units.
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)