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I have pumping questions...

Posted by on Feb. 15, 2017 at 9:47 AM
  • 3 Replies
I've never breastfed or pumped before. I'm due with baby #3 in this September. I would like to pump faithfully. I'm uncomfortable with the breastfeeding. I guess my questions are what type of diet will I need to maintain? Foods and beverages to stay away from? And how soon and how often can I pump? My 2 dd's were formula babies.
by on Feb. 15, 2017 at 9:47 AM
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mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:05 AM
Most women can eat and drink any and everything with no issue for their babies. Occasionally a baby might have an intolerance or allergy to proteins from something mom ate, most suspicious is dairy (NOT to be confused with lactose), and soy.

Even Hospital grade pumps are only about half as efficient as a baby at removing milk, so you'll technically find that you'll be pumping more often and for longer durations than a breastfeeding mom is feeding her baby. If your intent is to successfully and exclusively pump, check with your health insurance company to see if you can get full coverage on a good, double electric pump, like hygeia or spectra. Start pumping within the first few hours after birth. Colostrum is thick and difficult to pump, but very important, even the half ounce you'll pump at first. Continue to pump at least every 2 hours during the day and every 3 hours throughout the night. Most moms pump about 20 minutes.

It's a commitment for sure, but also a great INVESTMENT in your baby's health.

Pop over to kellymom.com for more info on breastfeeding, and pumping. Lots of research and articles on all things breastfeeding related.

Can I ask, what about breastfeeding makes you uncomfortable? Many, many moms feel that way until they try it; though it doesn't help if your partner and family arent supportive. But I also understand that some women have personal history that makes it difficult to push past those feelings to nurse. And then again other women find it healing to reclaim their bodies for their babies.
MusherMaggie
by Ruby Member on Feb. 15, 2017 at 10:15 AM
It is always best to nurse the baby at the breast. It can be done discreetly, with nothing showing. Nursing at the breast is how you make antibodies and nutrients that are specific to your baby, and how the milk is able to change moment by moment to meet those needs. Eating a variety of whole foods in as close to their natural state is what we recommend.

The first milk that you make immediately after the baby is born is colostrum. It is very thick and concentrated, and very difficult to pump. It is very important that the baby gets as much of this as possible as it supports the virgin gut and helps the baby pass meconium, which will help prevent jaundice. It is much easier for the baby to get this from the breast.

If you choose to exclusively pump, you will have to have a good quality double electric pump. In the beginning, you will have to pump every 90 minutes to 2 hours around the clock, including at night, for 15 minutes at a time. You will need milk storage bags, replacement pump membranes every 4-6 weeks, and possibly other replacement parts. You will have to maintain this schedule for 6 weeks or so. After that, you can pump every 2 hours during the day but you may be able to go every three at night. Maintaining a supply with a pump is harder because a well-latched baby is at least 50% more efficient than the best of pumps. Much easier to just latch the baby on, particularly at night. A co-sleeper attached to your side of the bed makes this easy at night; slide the baby over, nurse and slide him back.

Read posts here and on Kellymom.com. Two books : " So That's What They're For " by Janet Tamaro and " The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding " from La Leche League. Go to LLLI.org and see if there is a group that meets near you. Meetings are free and it helps to see other mothers nursing in real life. Read the sections on pumps and lip and tongue ties in our FAQ section. Google " Find an IBCLC " ( Internationally Board Certified Lactation Consultant ). This is your go-to breastfeeding professional. Pop in here any time you have questions.
mostlymaydays
by Group Admin - Stacy on Feb. 15, 2017 at 11:06 AM
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Here's a direct kellymom.com link to their exclusive pumping page:


http://kellymom.com/mother2mother/exclusive-pumping/
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