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Second night syndrome

Posted by on Oct. 6, 2017 at 12:06 PM
  • 15 Replies
I'm just mentally preparing myself to try to successfully bf my baby that's due in 14 weeks. This will be my second baby. BF did not work out last time due to various reasons but I am determined to learn from those problems and hopefully will be more successful this time.

This is an issue I hear about so so so often.

What is your advice/words of wisdom to overcome this?

Here is an article describing it

https://fedisbest.org/2017/10/my-baby-scream-cried-the-entire-second-night-in-the-hospital/


*please don't bash the company; please don't say formula is evil poison or that im lazy or uneducated or a quitter*
by on Oct. 6, 2017 at 12:06 PM
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Replies (1-10):
amurb
by on Oct. 6, 2017 at 2:53 PM
It's important to stay calm and just do what feels natural when BF. I had a hard time doing it with all three of my kids so your not alone. Maybe talking with the lactaction nurse will help you out as well.
Luke8212013
by Member on Oct. 6, 2017 at 4:14 PM
I didn't bf my first son. With my second baby I was determined to try. I read a lot, talked to many different people & joined this group. I found great support and cut out the negative.
When my second son was born- I will admit it was hard. I didn't feel the greatest and I was nervous because he lost weight. My nurses and lactation comnsulrant were very supportive and informative. They assured me to continue to try & I was doing great and so was baby.
Luckily my milk came in before I even left the hospital and my baby has been thriving.
I didn't set a goal of how long I want to breastfeed or didn't set any expectations. I just wanted to try my best and do what I thought was best for my baby. I want to continue to breastfeed as long as both of us are happy doing so and doing well with it.
I think as long as you try, have great support and don't be to hard on yourself that's all you can do.
And I do agree with fed is best.
Best of luck to you!
And this group is wonderful for advice and support!
MusherMaggie
by Ruby Member on Oct. 6, 2017 at 4:30 PM
1 mom liked this
Keeping the baby skin-to-skin with you as much as possible in the first hours and days will help. It helps by making you aware of the earliest cues that your baby wants to suckle. Nursing reclined or upright, with your baby tummy-to-tummy with you vertically rather than horizontally,mouth over rather than under the nipple will help in case of overactive letdown and oversupply. Also, check your baby for lip and tongue ties. See our post on ties in our FAQ section. There are links to pictures, articles and a list of reputable providers by state who evaluate and revise ties if they are present.

What were the problems with your first? If you don't mind letting us know, ee can specifically help you avoid them.

Margarett RBC Zavodnyteal ribbon

MusherMaggie
by Ruby Member on Oct. 6, 2017 at 6:59 PM
1 mom liked this
I read the article. Do you have any of the issues the author describes?
Mom2Just1
by Silver Member on Oct. 9, 2017 at 8:19 AM
That article is crap. That whole campaign is anti breastfeeding!
Mom2Just1
by Silver Member on Oct. 9, 2017 at 8:21 AM
You should read up on the fed is best group. They’re pro formula, routinely give out bad information, etc. the article states babies shouldn’t want to nurse less than every 2 hours. My son nursed around the clock because his comfort, food, etc all involves nursing.

Quoting MusherMaggie: I read the article. Do you have any of the issues the author describes?
MusherMaggie
by Ruby Member on Oct. 9, 2017 at 8:55 AM
I think the previous commenters are right. Fed is Best brings up all sorts of breastfeeding "problems" without solutions because they don't believe that formula is a lesser "product" than breastmilk. The whole site is full of misinformation. Read pists here and on Kellymom.com. You'll have correct information with us.
wmendes
by Member on Oct. 9, 2017 at 11:36 AM


Quoting Mom2Just1: That article is crap. That whole campaign is anti breastfeeding!
wmendes
by Member on Oct. 9, 2017 at 11:40 AM
That article is about a real woman and her real baby who really did starve during his second day of life.
It doesn't matter what you think of the website...what could I do, as someone who wants to bf successfully, to overcome this type of situation? Because news parents are vulnerable and just want their babies to healthy so they don't know who to listen to.

Their campaign is not anti breastfeeding btw! They have so many articles and events for breastfeeding (everything from support to awareness). They even have many articles on tube feeding, combo feeding, and basically anything having to do with infants and eating.


Quoting Mom2Just1: That article is crap. That whole campaign is anti breastfeeding!
wmendes
by Member on Oct. 9, 2017 at 11:47 AM
Main issues were he was jaundiced and had little energy to nurse. My nipples didn't not get "hard" until my milk came in around day 3.
The nurses and doctors really pushed just feeding and pooping. I just wanted to take him home so badly I listened to anyone. Ended up giving him bottles with my milk because at least he had enough energy to drink that and poop:
By the time he was discharged and his jaundice was mostly cleared up- he had no patience to bf. He would do it for comfort or he would try for a couple minutes but I guess he wanted the milk faster because he would fuss and stop eating. He also always had his hands in the way:...kept trying to put them in his mouth while at the breast.

It was just so frustrating. He would nurse for 20 mins (as recommended), but as soon as he unlatched, he'd sleep for maybe 5 minutes- poop- and then act hungry again.

I was also in that new mom fog and had no idea what I was doing.


Quoting MusherMaggie: Keeping the baby skin-to-skin with you as much as possible in the first hours and days will help. It helps by making you aware of the earliest cues that your baby wants to suckle. Nursing reclined or upright, with your baby tummy-to-tummy with you vertically rather than horizontally,mouth over rather than under the nipple will help in case of overactive letdown and oversupply. Also, check your baby for lip and tongue ties. See our post on ties in our FAQ section. There are links to pictures, articles and a list of reputable providers by state who evaluate and revise ties if they are present.

What were the problems with your first? If you don't mind letting us know, ee can specifically help you avoid them.
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