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how do i grow my own seeds??successfully!!

Posted by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 9:58 AM
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i am so jealous of the pre-planting success. my dh and i do this every yr and we have no luck at all...idk what we do wrong but our poor pathetic starts hardly ever make it....anyone have any advice? we live in  ne ohio and are trying to start our own and plant and can everything but so far everything has already died.......i have canned a bunch in the past both from our garden and farmers markets and loved it. i am planning on doing so this yr also. and even going to attempt making baby food......but i need to get my seeds growing first so i can have food to can!!! and this is where my question is, if anyone has any advice or anything on what we should do it would be super. thanks amanda

by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 9:58 AM
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breezy2005
by Member on Apr. 8, 2009 at 10:15 AM

Sorry I can not help you with this one. I have never had any luck with this. I do better when I just drop my seeds in the ground and let them go. But every time I have tried to pot the seeds they never make it. I gave up after the first two years and now I just put my seed stright in the ground so they can grow. Lot less work to by doing this too. And I have more luck this way. We have a big garden every year.

Angie

 

4time-mom
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 10:44 AM

I don't start my seeds. I wait til the outside conditions are right to pop the seeds directly into the freshly tilled garden. I've had very little problem doing it that way. Last year I bought tomato plants, and got very little from them - but my volunteer tomatoes had a better yield than I wanted! I'm in Iowa, if that helps - a little north of OP I believe. Technically I should be planting my potatoes Friday, but we still have snow from the weekend blizzard! Conditions have to be too "perfect" for me to mess with seedlings. 

 

amcknabb529
by New Member on Apr. 8, 2009 at 5:56 PM

thank you ladies that replied....im glad im not the only one that cant grow starters!!!! do you know where i can get the info that tells you when you should plant the seeds and things such as potatoes? that would be a big help. thank you....:D

michiganmom116
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 6:33 PM

I've started my own seeds several times.  

Buy Jiffy peat pellets.  These are dry round disks.  Place them in a shallow container like an aluminum pie plate, dishpan, etc.  Add warm water to the pan and let the peat pellets soak it up until they don't absorb any more water.  You'll see them grow from a flat disk to about 1 1/2 inches tall.  Drain the excess water from the pan.

Using a pencil, poke a hole deep enough for the seeds (directions should be on the seed packet.)  Drop the seeds in, only 2 or 3 per pellet, then use the pencil to gently cover them up.  Cover the pan and pellets with plastic wrap and place in a sunny spot.  Once the seedlings start to show, remove the plastic wrap.  You need to leave the seedlings in the sunny spot. 

When seedlings are about 1 inch tall, thin them to 1 seedling per pellet.  Continue watering the pellets by pouring the water into the pan and letting the pellets soak it up.  If your pellets are squishy and soggy, you're giving them too much water.  If the tops are dry and the bottoms are damp, that's ok; the roots of the seedlings will reach down to the water.  I like to use Miracle Gro every 2 weeks.

When the seedlings are about 3 - 4 inches tall, transplant them into styrofoam cups with potting soil.  For tomatoes, put the pellet into the cup first and fill the cup with potting soil to the first real leaves.  The buried stem will grow more roots, giving the plant a stronger root system.  Continue to water the seedlings carefully, not too much or you'll rot the roots.

Seven to ten days before planting, begin placing the seedlings in the containers outside.  Start off in a sunny area that is protected from the wind for a few hours, then increase the exposure to the sun and winds.  You'll need to water them more to compensate for the evaporation caused by sun and winds.  This should harden them off to prepare them for transplanting into your garden.

When it's time to transplant into your garden, dig a hole first, then CUT or PEEL the styrofoam cup from the plant.  Do not pull on the plant to remove it from the cup.  Again, with tomatoes, plant them deep enough so that the plant is as tall as it is wide.  Buried stem will only grow more roots.  Transplant on a cloudy day, close to the evening as possible.  Water with Miracle Gro right away, then again every two to three days unless your soil is wet.  You may see transplant shock on several plants (wilted leaves, loss of green color) but watch for new leaves that should form and grow after transplanting; they should be a bright green.


4time-mom
by on Apr. 8, 2009 at 7:51 PM

There's a chart right on the seed packet that shows what zone you're in, and the best time for planting. I don't go by that though, I do it when we've had a few weeks of good temps (that aren't below 32 at night). As for potatoes...I was always told to plant them on Good Friday, but it's too cold here to do that most years. I usually plant them anywhere from 2 weeks before the rest of my garden to right before planting the rest. My grandma always followed Farmers Almanac to a T, but I don't whatsoever, and I usually have had better crops (she just moved out of her own place recently, this will be the 2nd year not comparing gardens with her). A lot of people swear by Farmers Almanac though.

Quoting amcknabb529:

thank you ladies that replied....im glad im not the only one that cant grow starters!!!! do you know where i can get the info that tells you when you should plant the seeds and things such as potatoes? that would be a big help. thank you....:D


 

sweetlillie
by Member on Apr. 28, 2009 at 11:56 PM

This week we just planted our cold weather plants-green beans, peas, beets, turnips, broccoli, cauliflower, and lettuce.  When the weather warms up we will plant the rest of the plants.  I try to go by the back of the package, but usually we have to wait until the rain stops enough so that we can plow and disk the field to get everything in.  this year was the first year we have planted in april in a long time.  We are in Oregon.

michiganmom116
by on Apr. 29, 2009 at 8:03 AM


Quoting sweetlillie:

This week we just planted our cold weather plants-green beans, peas, beets, turnips, broccoli, cauliflower, and lettuce.  When the weather warms up we will plant the rest of the plants.  I try to go by the back of the package, but usually we have to wait until the rain stops enough so that we can plow and disk the field to get everything in.  this year was the first year we have planted in april in a long time.  We are in Oregon.

Green beans are NOT a cold weather plant.  They love heat and warm ground, so be prepared for them to either not come up or grow well at first.  They won't survive a frost like the others will.

Esther1102
by Member on Apr. 30, 2009 at 10:35 AM

I'm in West Virginia ( Eastern Panhandle) and I wanted to let you know what I have done this year and had great luck so far. We got one of those little indoor greenhouses from Wal Mart. I used plastic cups (mainly because that is what I had laying around) to start all my seeds in. I filled the cups about 1/2 way with good potting soil and popped about 3 seeds in each cup using a pencil then covered them lightly with soil. Water lightly. The cups that I have are see through so I could see how much water was in each one. Pop them in the green house and check them every couple of days for water and growth. The greenhouse is in front of a north facing sunny window. I also have a lamp beside them and turn it on when there isn't much sun ect. They have done great so far. What I have done as far as hardening is take the plants out on a cloudy or rainy day and sit out on the deck. They get the same amount of light ect in this spot as they do inside. If the weather is going to be really cool I have brought them in and if not I just let them out. I have had great luck this way. Hope that you have some great luck in the future! Oh I don't put them out till they have thier first real leaves ( some people call them cross leaves) on them and some new ones starting to come in from the center.

mikesplum
by New Member on Apr. 30, 2009 at 11:39 AM

At the first part of the year, we start saving our gallon plastic milk jugs - 3 kids, we go through a lot.  Poke holes in the bottom and about 2/3 of the way to the top cut a smiley shape.  The top should bend back pretty easy.  Put soil in the bottom and plant your seeds.  Water as needed.  This acts like a mini greenhouse and your reusing something instead of throwing it away.  I never had much luck before, but this works great!  My plants are every bit as big as what you can get from a store right now. 

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