Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Pop Culture Junkies Pop Culture Junkies

CVS refusing to sell 'Rolling Stone' Boston Bomber issue

Posted by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 3:20 PM
  • 18 Replies

By Sydney Bucksbaum, Zap2It

                    

Rolling Stone's latest issue is causing a lot of controversy -- featured on the cover of the August issue is a close-up photo of the alleged Boston bombing suspect, Dzhohkar Tsarnaev. While the magazine hits newsstands on Friday (July 19), some places won't be selling it at all.

On Wednesday (July 17), CVS announced that its stores will not sell or promote the Tsarnaev cover. In a statement from the company, representatives said they couldn't support Rolling Stone. "CVS/pharmacy has decided not to sell the current issue of Rolling Stone featuring a cover photo of the Boston Marathon bombing suspect," the statement said. "As a company with deep roots in New England and a strong presence in Boston, we believe this is the right decision out of respect for the victims of the attack and their loved ones."

The cover photo sparked controversy and a brutal social media backlash when a preview debuted Tuesday (July 16) because many thought it was extremely similar to a photo spread of Jim Morrison and made Tsarnaev out to look like a rock star. 

Rolling Stone responded publicly to criticism over the cover photo and reports of boycotts later on Wednesday (July 17). "The cover story we are publishing this week falls within the traditions of journalism and Rolling Stone's longstanding commitment to serious and thoughtful coverage," the publication said in a statement. "The fact that Dzhokhar Tsarnaev is young, and in the same age group as many of our readers, makes it all the more important for us to examine the complexities of this issue and gain a more complete understanding of how a tragedy like this happens."

The cover story -- of which the photo is an instagrammed selfie of Tsarnaev -- is a "riveting account" of the suspect's life in Cambridge and Boston. According to the magazine's editorial staff, the cover is meant to highlight a "deeply reported account of the life and times of Boston bomber Jahar Tsarnaev," with two months worth of detailed reporting and commentary from the suspect's childhood friends and former classmates, as well as teachers, neighbors, and law enforcement agents.

Follow Zap2it on Twitter and Zap2it on Facebook for the latest news and buzz

Photo/Video credit: Rolling Stone
by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 3:20 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
jltplk25
by Platinum Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 7:00 PM

 Can't say I blame the company. Seems like RS is glorifying the bomber but I see the merit in discussing WHY he chose the path he did.

mushmom
by Bronze Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 7:43 PM
Isn't Rolling Stone supposed to be about music?
A big fat kudos to CVS!!
crazymomof2374
by Bronze Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 8:18 PM
Can't blame any store that doesn't sell the magazine. It should be about the victims not the murderer.
PinkParadox
by Beautifully Broken on Jul. 17, 2013 at 9:18 PM
You know, I can't really say anything without reading the article. People are upset about how the picture makes it look, and I get that. But this may be a legitimate story, not a glorifying one...and while understand that Rolling Stone is ultimately a music magazine, I will never argue the printing of important news, explanations and in the end...a warning. Again, I would need to read it before judgment
Jansan24
by Member on Jul. 17, 2013 at 9:38 PM
2 moms liked this

I personally believe the cover glamorizes terrorism. It's not fair to the families affected by this horrific act of violence.

PinkParadox
by Beautifully Broken on Jul. 17, 2013 at 11:15 PM

I don't know...I guess I just see it kind of different.  It says, right on the cover, that he's a monster.  I see it more as a "don't let this happen to you" or don't let this be your child kind of message.  This is a normal looking kid, that was a good student...that become a monster and killed a bunch of people.  The psychology of why is actually important.  In any combat, you leanr your enemy before defeating them.  Just calling it a tragedy, but not truly delving in to in how's and whys solves nothing.  But, I'm a weirdo.  I don't see every celebrity on the cover as a magazine as a celebrity.  The actual content is certainly more important.  I think it says a lot about our society, that a lot of people won't read the actual content, because they're offended by the picture.

sara_7106
by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 11:17 PM
I agree


Quoting Jansan24:

I personally believe the cover glamorizes terrorism. It's not fair to the families affected by this horrific act of violence.


sara_7106
by on Jul. 17, 2013 at 11:20 PM
1 mom liked this
It may say monster, but he looks like a rock star on a music magazine. The article may be informative an helpful but IMO this cover sends the wrong message. To me it says, "blow up some people and you too could land the cover of Rolling Stone".


Quoting PinkParadox:

I don't know...I guess I just see it kind of different.  It says, right on the cover, that he's a monster.  I see it more as a "don't let this happen to you" or don't let this be your child kind of message.  This is a normal looking kid, that was a good student...that become a monster and killed a bunch of people.  The psychology of why is actually important.  In any combat, you leanr your enemy before defeating them.  Just calling it a tragedy, but not truly delving in to in how's and whys solves nothing.  But, I'm a weirdo.  I don't see every celebrity on the cover as a magazine as a celebrity.  The actual content is certainly more important.  I think it says a lot about our society, that a lot of people won't read the actual content, because they're offended by the picture.


PinkParadox
by Beautifully Broken on Jul. 17, 2013 at 11:28 PM

But isn't that a perception?  That the picture speaks louder than the words?  I think that's the very point. He didn't pose for this picture.  This is the picture of a normal kid, that some how went terribly wrong.  He is a monster.  He did kill a bunch of people.  But, I think it trivializes the entire situation to make it seem like he was just born a monster.  He was a created monster, in whatever sense you want to look at it.  And if people can't see the content, beyond the picture, it will continue to happen.  No parent ever wants to think it might be their kid.  Their "normal", good grades, popular kid.

Quoting sara_7106:

It may say monster, but he looks like a rock star on a music magazine. The article may be informative an helpful but IMO this cover sends the wrong message. To me it says, "blow up some people and you too could land the cover of Rolling Stone".


Quoting PinkParadox:

I don't know...I guess I just see it kind of different.  It says, right on the cover, that he's a monster.  I see it more as a "don't let this happen to you" or don't let this be your child kind of message.  This is a normal looking kid, that was a good student...that become a monster and killed a bunch of people.  The psychology of why is actually important.  In any combat, you leanr your enemy before defeating them.  Just calling it a tragedy, but not truly delving in to in how's and whys solves nothing.  But, I'm a weirdo.  I don't see every celebrity on the cover as a magazine as a celebrity.  The actual content is certainly more important.  I think it says a lot about our society, that a lot of people won't read the actual content, because they're offended by the picture.



sara_7106
by on Jul. 18, 2013 at 12:03 AM
1 mom liked this
Yes the picture is worth a thousand words, and I'm afraid that even if the article is insightful not enough people will read it to negate the cover. I think part of what rubs me the wrong way is that it's a music magazine. If this were Time or Newsweek it would be less disturbing. I think many teens aspire to be on the cover of rolling stone and just the fact that it is rolling stone glamorizes his behavior.



Quoting PinkParadox:

But isn't that a perception?  That the picture speaks louder than the words?  I think that's the very point. He didn't pose for this picture.  This is the picture of a normal kid, that some how went terribly wrong.  He is a monster.  He did kill a bunch of people.  But, I think it trivializes the entire situation to make it seem like he was just born a monster.  He was a created monster, in whatever sense you want to look at it.  And if people can't see the content, beyond the picture, it will continue to happen.  No parent ever wants to think it might be their kid.  Their "normal", good grades, popular kid.

Quoting sara_7106:

It may say monster, but he looks like a rock star on a music magazine. The article may be informative an helpful but IMO this cover sends the wrong message. To me it says, "blow up some people and you too could land the cover of Rolling Stone".





Quoting PinkParadox:

I don't know...I guess I just see it kind of different.  It says, right on the cover, that he's a monster.  I see it more as a "don't let this happen to you" or don't let this be your child kind of message.  This is a normal looking kid, that was a good student...that become a monster and killed a bunch of people.  The psychology of why is actually important.  In any combat, you leanr your enemy before defeating them.  Just calling it a tragedy, but not truly delving in to in how's and whys solves nothing.  But, I'm a weirdo.  I don't see every celebrity on the cover as a magazine as a celebrity.  The actual content is certainly more important.  I think it says a lot about our society, that a lot of people won't read the actual content, because they're offended by the picture.





Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)