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Alexandrian..

Posted by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 4:52 PM
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The tradition is based largely upon Gardnerian Wicca, in which Sanders was trained to the first degree of initiation[3], and also contains elements of ceremonial magic and Qabalah, which Sanders had studied independently. This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ... Ceremonial magic is a branch of magick. ... The tree of life Kabbalah (קבלה Reception, Standard Hebrew Qabbala, Tiberian Hebrew Qabbālāh; also written variously as Cabala, Cabalah, Cabbala, Cabbalah, Kabala, Kabalah, Kabbala, Qabala, Qabalah) is a religious philosophical system claiming an insight into divine nature. ...


The Tradition is named after the ancient library of Alexandria[3], which was one of the first libraries in the world. The choice of name was inspired by a view of the library as an early attempt to bring together the knowledge and wisdom of the world into one place[4]. Maxine Sanders recalls that the name was chosen when Stewart Farrar, a student of the Sanders', began to write What Witches Do. "Stewart asked what Witches who were initiated via our Covens should be called; after much discussion, he came up with "Alexandrian" which both Alex and I rather liked. Before this time we were very happy to be called Witches"[5]. This article or section contains inappropriate citations. ... Stewart Farrar at home, 1999 Stewart Farrar (June 28, 1916 - February 7, 2000) was a well-known author of books on Alexandrian Wicca. ...


Alexandrian Wicca is practiced outside of Britain, including both Canada and the United States. Encyclopedia Mystic states that Alexandrian Wicca "never gained the popularity as did the Gardnerian tradition because it is believed Sanders’ negative publicity hurt it. As of the 1980s none of the American Alexandrian covens had any connection with Sanders himself. The Alexandrian covens have done better in Canada where they were more firmly established before all of Sanders’ negative publicity"[6]. Coven or covan was originally a late medieval Scots word (c1500) meaning a gathering of any kind according to the Oxford English Dictionary. ...


Practices

Alexandrian Wicca, in similarity with other traditional Wiccan practices, emphasizes gender polarity. This emphasis can be seen in the Sabbat rituals, which focus on the relationship between the Wiccan Goddess and God. In the Wiccan form of neopaganism, a Sabbat is one of the eight major seasonal festivals which make up the Wheel of the Year. ...


As compared to Gardnerian Wicca, Alexandrian Wicca is "somewhat more eclectic", according to The Encyclopedia of Modern Witchcraft and Neo-Paganism[3]. Maxine Sanders notes that Alexandrians, as opposed to "a few fuddy-duddies" take the attitude "If it works use it"[5]. Tool use and deity and elemental names also differ from the Gardnerian tradition[3]. Skyclad practice, or ritual nudity, is optional within the tradition, training is emphasized, and ceremonial magic practices, such as Kabbalah and Enochian magic may be part of ritual [3]. Eclectic Wicca is a widely accepted branch of Neopaganism, in which followers include multiple aspects involved in other Wiccan traditions. ... In mysticism, mythology and alchemy, an elemental is a creature (usually a spirit) that is attuned with, or composed of, one of the classical elements: air, earth, fire and water. ... In Wicca, skyclad properly means naked outdoors, though it is frequently used to mean nudity anywhere. ... Ceremonial magic is a branch of magick. ... This article is about the overall Jewish mysticisms tradition. ... Enochian Magic is an elaborate system of ceremonial magic devised by John Dee and Edward Kelly. ...


Alexandrian covens meet on new moons, full moons and during Sabbat festivals[2]. In the Wiccan form of neopaganism, a Sabbat is one of the eight major seasonal festivals which make up the Wheel of the Year. ...


Ranks and degrees

Alexandrian Wicca shares with other traditional Wicca systems the belief that "only a witch can make another witch"[4]. The process through which an individual is made a witch is called "initiation". As in Gardnerian Wicca, there are three levels, or "degrees", of initiation, commonly referred to as "first", "second", and "third" degree. Only a second or third degree witch can initiate another into witchcraft, and only a third degree witch can initiate another to third degree. A third degree initiate is referred to as a "High Priestess" or "High Priest"[4]. The Farrars claimed to have published the rituals for the three ceremonies of initiation in Eight Sabbats for Witches[7]. Coming from the Latin, initiation implies a beginning. ... This article or section contains information that has not been verified and thus might not be reliable. ...


Some Alexandrians have instituted a preliminary rank called "neophyte" or "dedicant." In these Alexandrian covens, a neophyte is not bound by the oaths taken by initiates, and thus has an opportunity to examine the tradition before committing to it[4].


Relationship to other traditions

Scholar Ronald Hutton records comments from British practitioners of Gardnerian and Alexandrian Wicca that distinctions between the two traditions have blurred in the last couple of decades, and some initiates of both traditions have recognized initiation within one as qualification for the other[7]. Author Vivianne Crowley often trains her students in both traditions[3]. In the United States, Alexandrian priestess Mary Nesnick, an initiate of both traditions, created a deliberate fusion of the two, which she named the "Algard" tradition[3]. Ronald Hutton is Professor of History at the University of Bristol and is an occasional commentator on British television and radio in areas not always of his expertise. ...


Janet and Stewart Farrar, both of whom were initiated into the Alexandrian tradition by the Sanderses, describe themselves as having left the tradition after the release of Eight Sabbats for Witches[8]. They were later referred to as "Reformed Alexandrian"[9], a description that Janet Farrar does not use[9]. The "Starkindler Line" is derived from Alexandrian Wicca[10], and Alexandrian Wicca was a major influence on both Blue Star Wicca[11] and Odyssean Wicca[12]. Farrar, in a photograph taken by her husband, Stewart Farrar, demonstrates the Osiris pose in a 1981 book she co-authored. ... Blue Star Wicca is one of a number of Wiccan traditions created in the United States in the 1970s based loosely on the Gardnerian and Alexandrian traditions. ... The Odyssean Tradition of Wicca was founded by Richard and Tamara James in 1979. ...





by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 4:52 PM
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Replies (1-8):
GreenEyePixie
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 5:22 PM

That is really interesting!

glitterteaz
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 5:25 PM

 Glad you enjoyed it!

GreenEyePixie
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 5:35 PM

Can i have the website you got that from i would like to read more about it 8-)

CoeyG
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 5:41 PM

 Thank you thank you than you...

glitterteaz
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 5:45 PM

 I will go back and look for it hun

 

Quoting GreenEyePixie:

Can i have the website you got that from i would like to read more about it 8-)

 




glitterteaz
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 5:46 PM
GreenEyePixie
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 5:48 PM

Thank ye much!!

Quoting glitterteaz:

Here ya go pixie!!! 

http://www.statemaster.com/encyclopedia/Alexandrian-Wicca


Lil_ol_me9306
by on Feb. 20, 2010 at 6:12 PM

bump

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