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How much will it cost to raise a child?

Posted by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:11 PM
  • 12 Replies
expenses each year

Age 0 $14,000 Age 10 $10,000
 
Age 1 $14,000 Age 11 $9,800
Age 3 $12,600 Age 13 $9,800
Age 4 $12,600 Age 14 $3,800
Age 5 $12,800 Age 15 $3,800
Age 6 $10,000 Age 16 $3,800
Age 7 $10,000 Age 17 $3,200
Age 8 $10,000 Age 18 $3,200
Age 9 $10,000 Age 19 $0

Graph Image for 'Costs by age'

 

Before-tax income: up to $39,100 0 to 2 2,240 1,010 730 330 220 530 380 5,440 3 to 5 2,550 1,060 640 350 330 720 500 6,150 6 to 8 2,710 1,340 740 410 390 650 670 6,910 9 to 11 2,600 1,550 530 420 490 310 540 6,440 12 to 14 2,600 1,550 620 710 520 400 520 6,920 15 to 17 2,760 1,690 970 830 520 300 600 7,670 Total 46,380 24,600 12,690 9,150 7,410 8,730 9,630 118,590   Before-tax income: $39,100 and up 0 to 2 4,820 1,560 2,220 470 510 1,290 1,580 12,450 3 to 5 4,820 1,650 2,130 500 690 1,620 1,690 13,410 6 to 8 5,290 1,980 2,240 570 790 1,510 1,870 14,250 9 to 11 5,180 2,380 2,030 580 950 880 1,740 13,740 12 to 14 5,190 2,380 2,110 950 1,000 1,260 1,720 14,560 15 to 17 5,340 2,470 2,290 1,090 990 1,030 1,800 15,010 Total 92,850 37,110 39,060 12,480 14,790 22,770 31,200 250,260

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture. Estimates are based on 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey updated to 2001 dollars using the Consumer Price Index.

by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:11 PM
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Replies (1-10):
sarahbearamommy
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:14 PM
I think these are ridiculous numbers. I guess it depends on all sorts of variables.
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Forget-me-not
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:15 PM
Me too, my youngest is one and I've not even spent a fraction of that. Who the hell are they polling anyway?


Quoting sarahbearamommy:

I think these are ridiculous numbers. I guess it depends on all sorts of variables.

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sarahbearamommy
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:26 PM
Maybe that includes hospital expenses from labor/birth lol cuz I definitely have not spent anywhere near 14,000 in the 3 yrs my sons been on earth

Quoting Forget-me-not:

Me too, my youngest is one and I've not even spent a fraction of that. Who the hell are they polling anyway?




Quoting sarahbearamommy:

I think these are ridiculous numbers. I guess it depends on all sorts of variables.

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TheJerseyGirl
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:40 PM

 that has to be wrong! Have you seen teenage boys and their friends eat??? Have they seen the closets of 16 year old girls???

Teeshann
by Silver Member on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:41 PM

 i need to show these to my hubby who thinks i spend way too much on the kids cuz to him it seems like i buy them clothes all the time. hmm. gotta love them growth spurts.

ffirsttimemommy
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:44 PM


Quoting sarahbearamommy:

I think these are ridiculous numbers. I guess it depends on all sorts of variables.


maciymommieof3
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:45 PM

Juicy Couture Jeans, Coach Handbags...just for starters!

Quoting TheJerseyGirl:

 that has to be wrong! Have you seen teenage boys and their friends eat??? Have they seen the closets of 16 year old girls???


maciymommieof3
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:48 PM

Dual-Parent Family

Age
of Child
Housing Food Transportation Clothing Health Child care/
Education
Miscellaneous Total
Before-tax income: up to $39,100
0 to 2 2,500 910 780 370 460 840 630 6490
3 to 5 2,470 1,010 750 360 440 820 680 6,630
6 to 8 2,380 1,300 880 400 510 560 680 6,710
9 to 11 2,150 1,560 950 450 560 340 720 6,730
12 to 14 2,400 1,640 1,070 750 560 240 900 7,560
15 to 17 1,940 1,780 1,440 660 600 400 660 7,480
Total 41,520 24,600 17,610 8,970 9,390 9,990 12,720 124,800
 
Before-tax income: $39,100 to $65,800
0 to 2 3,380 1,090 1,160 430 610 1,380 980 9,030
3 to 5 3,350 1,260 1,130 420 580 1,530 990 9,260
6 to 8 3,260 1,600 1,260 470 660 980 1,030 9,260
9 to 11 3,030 1,890 1,330 520 720 640 1,250 9,190
12 to 14 3,280 1,900 1,450 870 720 470 1,250 9,940
15 to 17 2,820 2,110 1,840 780 770 810 1,010 10,140
Total 57,360 29,550 24,510 10,470 12,180 17,430 18,960 170,460
 
Before-tax income: $65,800 and up
0 to 2 5,370 1,440 1,630 570 700 2,090 1,630 13,430
3 to 5 5,340 1,630 1,600 560 670 2,270 1,650 13,720
6 to 8 5,250 1,970 1,720 610 770 1,560 1,690 13,570
9 to 11 5,020 2,290 1,800 670 820 1,090 1,720 13,410
12 to 14 5,270 2,400 1,920 1,100 830 840 1,900 13,170
15 to 17 4,810 2,530 2,330 1,000 870 1,470 1,660 14,670
Total 93,180 36,780 33,000 13,530 13,980 27,960 30,750 249,180

Single-Parent Family

Age
of Child
Housing Food Transportation Clothing Health Child care/
Education
Miscellaneous Total
Before-tax income: up to $39,100
0 to 2 2,240 1,010 730 330 220 530 380 5,440
3 to 5 2,550 1,060 640 350 330 720 500 6,150
6 to 8 2,710 1,340 740 410 390 650 670 6,910
9 to 11 2,600 1,550 530 420 490 310 540 6,440
12 to 14 2,600 1,550 620 710 520 400 520 6,920
15 to 17 2,760 1,690 970 830 520 300 600 7,670
Total 46,380 24,600 12,690 9,150 7,410 8,730 9,630 118,590
 
Before-tax income: $39,100 and up
0 to 2 4,820 1,560 2,220 470 510 1,290 1,580 12,450
3 to 5 4,820 1,650 2,130 500 690 1,620 1,690 13,410
6 to 8 5,290 1,980 2,240 570 790 1,510 1,870 14,250
9 to 11 5,180 2,380 2,030 580 950 880 1,740 13,740
12 to 14 5,190 2,380 2,110 950 1,000 1,260 1,720 14,560
15 to 17 5,340 2,470 2,290 1,090 990 1,030 1,800 15,010
Total 92,850 37,110 39,060 12,480 14,790 22,770 31,200 250,260
Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture. Estimates are based on 1990-92 Consumer Expenditure Survey updated to 2001 dollars using the Consumer Price Index.


¹ The figures represent estimated expenses on the younger child in a two-child family. Estimates are about the same for the older child, so a family of two would then double the total cost. Thus, a family with two children and an income of less than $39,100, could expect to spend somewhere around $249,600, for two children by the time they each had reached age 18. If you have only one child, the USDA assumes you'll spend slightly more on that child and suggests multiplying the total expense for the appropriate age category by 1.24. If you have three or more children, the USDA assumes you'll spend slightly less per child. To estimate expenses for each child in a family with three or more children, multiply the total expense for each appropriate age category by 0.77. For expenses on all children in a family, these totals should be summed.

LyTe684
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:48 PM
Possible. But not 100% true. I think for a family with medical needs, yes. A child with no medical needs, not so much. Insurance, co pays, COL, etc.... very possible....
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maciymommieof3
by on Aug. 7, 2010 at 7:49 PM

WASHINGTON, June 18 (UPI) -- Raising a child from birth to age 17 cost middle-income parents $222,360 last year amid rising childcare and education expenses, the U.S. government reported.

The Department of Agriculture's annual Expenditures on Children and Families report provides a 50-year view of the child-rearing expenditures. From 1960 through 2009, adjusting for inflation, the cost of raising a child climbed 22 percent.

The report, based on a married couple's cost of raising a child in a two-child, middle-income family, found annual expenses ranged from $11,650 to $13,530 a year, depending on the cld's age, the Chicago Tribune reported.

Childcare and education expenses climbed from 2 percent to 17 percent of child-rearing costs, the report found. Housing topped all other family costs in 1960 and 2009, while the proportion of a family's income spent on housing rose.

Food also has placed among the biggest expenses since 1960 but the proportion of family income spent on food has dropped, in part because of changes in agriculture and increased competition. The report found clothing and miscellaneous expenses for a child decreased as a proportion of household spending.

Because of the high costs of raising a child and the sluggish economy, many people are wondering whether they should put off plans to have children, the Tribune said.

Lindsay Murphy told the newspaper she was eight months pregnant when she got laid off from her financial services job in Skokie, Ill., and she and her partner have discussed having another child.

"While we want another child and very much want our children to be close in age, we just can't get comfortable with the additional expense in light of the economy," said Murphy, of Wilmette, Ill.

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