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Oranges: Vitamin C in oranges protects sperm from genetic damage that may cause birth defects

Posted by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 4:06 AM
  • 5 Replies

Oranges

Vitamin C in oranges protects sperm
from genetic damage that may cause
birth defects



The orange is one of the most common and popular fruit.  It is well-liked because of its easy availability all year round, dense nutrition, and it tastes good.

 

Oranges are round citrus fruits ranging in diameter from about 2 to 3 inches, with finely texturized skins that are orange in color.

 

Its pulp is also orange in color and very succulent, surrounded by its skin which can vary in thickness depending on its variety.

 

There are oranges that are sweet, bitter and sour, so you'll need to know the variety you're buying.  The sweet variety are usually more fragrant.  They include Valencia, Navel and Jaffa oranges which are ideal for making juices.

 

 

In the orange family, there are also the Mandarin oranges (with loose skin), Clementine (loose skin and seedless), the tangerine (orange-red Mandarin), the Minneola (cross between tangerine and grapefruit), the blood orange that has dark burgundy colored flesh, kumquat, and a few other lesser known ones.

 

The Mandarin oranges are especially popular with the Chinese as the word "orange" in Chinese sounds like "gold" or "good luck".  Come the Lunar New Year, the Chinese buy oranges by the boxes to be given away to express good wishes for the new year.

 

 

 

Nutritional Benefits

Oranges are an excellent source of vitamin C and flavonoids.  One orange (130 grams) supplies nearly 100 percent of the recommended daily dietary intake of vitamin C.

When you eat a whole orange, it provides good dietary fiber.  Leave in the albedo (the white matter under the peel) as much as possible as the albedo contains the highest amount of valuable bioflavonoids and other anti-cancer agents.

In addition, oranges are a good source of vitamin A, the B vitamins, amino acids, beta-carotene, pectin, potassium, folic acid, calcium, iodine, phosphorus, sodium, zinc, manganese, chlorine and iron.

To top

 

Health Benefits

An orange packs over 170 different phytonutrients and more than 60 flavonoids, many of which have been shown to have anti-inflammatory, anti-tumour and blood clot inhibiting properties, as well as strong anti-oxidant effects.

The combination of the high amount of anti-oxidant (vitamin C) and flavonoids in oranges makes it one of the best fruits in helping to promote optimal health.

Arteriosclerosis:  Regularly consuming vitamin C retards the development of hardening of the arteries.

Cancer prevention:  A compound in oranges called liminoid, has been found to help fight cancers of the mouth, skin, lung, breast, stomach and colon.  The high vitamin C content also acts as a good anti-oxidant that protects cells from damages by free radicals.

Cholesterol:  The alkaloid synephrine found under the orange peel can reduce the liver's production of cholesterol.  Whereas the anti-oxidant fights oxidative stress that is the main culprit in oxidizing the LDLs in our blood.

Constipation:  Even though the orange "tastes acidic", it actually has an alkaline effect in the digestive system and helps stimulate the digestive juices, relieving constipation.

Damaged sperm, repair:  An orange a day is sufficient for a man to keep his sperm healthy.  Vitamin C, an anti-oxidant, protects sperm from genetic damage that may cause a birth defect.

Heart disease:  A high intake of flavonoids and vitamin C has been known to halve the risk of heart diseases.

High blood pressure:   Studies have shown that a flavonoid called hesperidin in oranges can lower high blood pressure.

Immune system:  The strong content of vitamin C stimulates white cells to fight infection, naturally building a good immune system.

Kidney stones, prevent:  Drinking orange juice daily can significantly drop the risk of formation of calcium oxalate stones in the kidney.

Skin:  The anti-oxidant in orange help protect the skin from free radical damage known to cause signs of aging.

Stomach ulcer:  Consuming vitamin C rich foods helps to lower the incidence of peptic ulcers and in turn, reduce the risk of stomach cancer.

Viral infections, protection against:  The abundance of polyphenols have been shown to provide protection against viral infections.

by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 4:06 AM
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Replies (1-5):
LivinDeadGurl
by Gold Member on Feb. 9, 2011 at 2:05 PM

Interesting!

LyTe684
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 2:07 PM

Very. And my Dh LOVES oranges.

Quoting LivinDeadGurl:

Interesting!


LiesLiesLies
by on Feb. 9, 2011 at 2:09 PM

Good to know!

Clairwil
by Silver Member on Feb. 9, 2011 at 5:35 PM
Quoting tatar:

Cholesterol:  The alkaloid synephrine found under the orange peel can reduce the liver's production of cholesterol.  Whereas the anti-oxidant fights oxidative stress that is the main culprit in oxidizing the LDLs in our blood.

Evidence?



Cholesterol is needed by the body, which uses it to construct various cell structures and hormones.  We take in a small amount of cholesterol in our diet but the majority of the cholesterol isn't eaten - it is created by the liver while digesting saturated fats.  Fat isn't soluble in water so it is carried around the body in the bloodstream inside 5 different types of lipoprotein particles:
 1. Chylomicrons (CM) - used to move fat and cholesterol from the intestine to the liver, where the fat is converted into cholesterol and triglycerides (the form of fat the body prefers to have it in)
 2. Very Low Density Lipoproteins (VLDL) - used to move triglycerides from the liver to the muscles and adipose tissue
 3. Intermediate Density Lipoproteins (IDL)
 4. Low Density Lipoproteins (LDL) - used to carry cholesterol from the liver to the cells of the body
 5. High Density Lipoproteins (HDL) - used to carry cholesterol from the cells of the body back to the liver where it is dumped out into the bile

In fact many of these are not really different types of particle, they are just classified by how much of which sort of thing they are carrying.  IDL is just the name given to the particle when it is on its way back from the muscles to the liver, characterised by how much fat and cholesterol it tends to be carrying on that stage of its journey.  LDLs are thought of as 'nasty' because, if you have too many in the blood the tissue can't accept cholesterol at such a fast rate and the excess gets dumped in the arteries where it causes Atherosclerosis which leads to heart attacks.  Doctors will talk to you about the ratio of LDLs to HDLs in your blood test result, but the LDLs are not the cause of the excess cholesterol - they're a symptom.  What actually needs to be reduced is the amount of cholesterol that is produced by the liver but not used in cells, and that means cutting down the amount of saturated fats consumed.

tatar
by on Feb. 10, 2011 at 11:33 AM

same here. Both DH and Ds love oranges as well.

Quoting LyTe684:

Very. And my Dh LOVES oranges.

Quoting LivinDeadGurl:

Interesting!



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