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POLITICO: Joe Biden 'Intoxicated' by Possible 2016 Run

Posted by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 12:53 PM
  • 54 Replies

 By Kate Hicks
Web Editor, Townhall.com

Vice President Joe Biden, known as much for his gaffes as for anything else in his four decades in politics, has long been rumored to be eyeing a presidential run in 2016. But new reports have surfaced, revealing the extent to which he layed the groundwork for such a campaign. Get ready: Sheriff Joe is at it again.

Biden, according to a number of advisers and Democrats who have spoken to him in recent months, wants to run, or at least be well positioned to run, if and when he decides to pull the trigger. Biden has expressed a clear sense of urgency, convinced the Democratic field will be defined quickly — and that it might very well come down to a private chat with Hillary Clinton about who should finish what Barack Obama started.

“He’s intoxicated by the idea, and it’s impossible not to be intoxicated by the idea,” said a Democrat close to the White House. And the intoxication is hardly new. Officials working on the Obama-Biden campaign last year were struck by how the vice president always seemed to have one eye on a run, including aggressively courting the president’s donors. Obama aides at times had to actively steer Biden to places where he was needed — like Pennsylvania — because he kept asking to be deployed to Iowa, New Hampshire and other early states.

“He wasn’t just doing fundraising the campaign assigned to him,” said a campaign adviser. “He was inviting people to the mansion to hang out and have dinner.” Biden was way more into the donors than Obama was. “He embraced it with a tirelessness and a gusto that even the president didn’t,” another campaign official said.

Looks like he's taking this pretty seriously, and if Hillary Clinton is, by turn, serious about quitting politics, then Biden looks to be the last of the "old guard" who would throw his hat into the ring. The question becomes, would that help his chances, or are the Democrats looking for a change in regime?

by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 12:53 PM
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Replies (1-10):
imamomzilla
by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 12:54 PM
3 moms liked this

 RUN, FORREST...er um...JOEY, RUN!

Ednarooni160
by Bronze Member on Jan. 24, 2013 at 2:26 PM
1 mom liked this

OH..MY..GOODNESS...there are "no" words..(smh).

imamomzilla
by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 2:31 PM

 Didn't we just have this convo the other day...about Joe possibly "drinking"?

LOL

 

Quoting Ednarooni160:

OH..MY..GOODNESS...there are "no" words..(smh).

 

Ednarooni160
by Bronze Member on Jan. 24, 2013 at 2:38 PM



Quoting imamomzilla:

 Didn't we just have this convo the other day...about Joe possibly "drinking"?

LOL

 

Quoting Ednarooni160:

OH..MY..GOODNESS...there are "no" words..(smh).

 

Why..."yes"...yes we did..

wink


mustbeGRACE
by Member on Jan. 24, 2013 at 4:09 PM
2 moms liked this

Why not?

It only gets chittier from here, people.

Momniscient
by Member on Jan. 24, 2013 at 4:10 PM

I was hoping the rumors were true.

It appears that they are not.

That's too bad.

ETA: oooooops. Just kidding. I didn't look at what group this was.

LOL. Perhaps the truth is a happy fact after all.


LoganTroyMom
by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 4:22 PM
3 moms liked this
i hope he does. he won't win. :)
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Aivlys_
by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 4:25 PM
3 moms liked this
Oh boy, so the stalkers found you. It is a ok, she is infatuated by your conservative beauty! ;)
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
imamomzilla
by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 4:27 PM
3 moms liked this

 wearing crown

Quoting Aivlys_:

Oh boy, so the stalkers found you. It is a ok, she is infatuated by your conservative beauty! ;)

 

Kate_Momof3
by on Jan. 24, 2013 at 5:25 PM

 

How to Use Quotation Marks

Summary: A rundown of the general rules of when and where to use quotation marks.

Contributors:Sean M. Conrey, Mark Pepper, Allen Brizee
Last Edited: 2012-11-19 05:16:55

Using Quotation Marks

The primary function of quotation marks is to set off and represent exact language (either spoken or written) that has come from somebody else. The quotation mark is also used to designate speech acts in fiction and sometimes poetry. Since you will most often use them when working with outside sources, successful use of quotation marks is a practical defense against accidental plagiarism and an excellent practice in academic honesty. The following rules of quotation mark use are the standard in the United States, although it may be of interest that usage rules for this punctuation do vary in other countries.

The following covers the basic use of quotation marks. For details and exceptions consult the separate sections of this guide.

Direct Quotations

Direct quotations involve incorporating another person's exact words into your own writing.

1. Quotation marks always come in pairs. Do not open a quotation and fail to close it at the end of the quoted material.

2. Capitalize the first letter of a direct quote when the quoted material is a complete sentence.

Mr. Johnson, who was working in his field that morning, said, "The alien spaceship appeared right before my own two eyes."

3. Do not use a capital letter when the quoted material is a fragment or only a piece of the original material's complete sentence.

Although Mr. Johnson has seen odd happenings on the farm, he stated that the spaceship "certainly takes the cake" when it comes to unexplainable activity.

4. If a direct quotation is interrupted mid-sentence, do not capitalize the second part of the quotation.

"I didn't see an actual alien being," Mr. Johnson said, "but I sure wish I had."

5. In all the examples above, note how the period or comma punctuation always comes before the final quotation mark. It is important to realize also that when you are using MLA or some other form of documentation, this punctuation rule may change.

When quoting text with a spelling or grammar error, you should transcribe the error exactly in your own text. However, also insert the term sic in italics directly after the mistake, and enclose it in brackets. Sic is from the Latin, and translates to "thus," "so," or "just as that." The word tells the reader that your quote is an exact reproduction of what you found, and the error is not your own.

Mr. Johnson says of the experience, "It's made me reconsider the existence of extraterestials [sic]."

6. Quotations are most effective if you use them sparingly and keep them relatively short. Too many quotations in a research paper will get you accused of not producing original thought or material (they may also bore a reader who wants to know primarily what YOU have to say on the subject).

Indirect Quotations

Indirect quotations are not exact wordings but rather rephrasings or summaries of another person's words. In this case, it is not necessary to use quotation marks. However, indirect quotations still require proper citations, and you will be commiting plagiarism if you fail to do so.

Mr. Johnson, a local farmer, reported last night that he saw an alien spaceship on his own property.

Many writers struggle with when to use direct quotations versus indirect quotations. Use the following tips to guide you in your choice.

Use direct quotations when the source material uses language that is particularly striking or notable. Do not rob such language of its power by altering it.

Martin Luther King Jr. believed that the end of slavery was important and of great hope to millions of slaves done horribly wrong.

The above should never stand in for:

Martin Luther King Jr. said of the Emancipation Proclamation, "This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice."

Use an indirect quotation (or paraphrase) when you merely need to summarize key incidents or details of the text.

Use direct quotations when the author you are quoting has coined a term unique to her or his research and relevant within your own paper.

When to use direct quotes versus indirect quotes is ultimately a choice you'll learn a feeling for with experience. However, always try to have a sense for why you've chosen your quote. In other words, never put quotes in your paper simply because your teacher says, "You must use quotes."

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