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Peanut allergy - public schools

Anonymous
Posted by Anonymous
  • 30 Replies
My dd is deadly allergic to peanuts and nuts, she is pretty good about not eating things from other people before asking, but, she's 5, sometimes a friend gives her a cookie and she forgets to ask or the friend, who doesn't have allergies says it doesn't matter and they split the cookie.

Well, right now she is in a small Montessori that is peanut free where the teachers know and are very aware, now, in August she is starting 1st grade in public school.

I have the forms for medication and everything, but I'd like to know what to expect about food allergies care; schools here are not peanut free and don't even have peanut free tables.

Can she get food from the cafeteria? How do they help the little kids to stay safe?

Thank you for the input
Posted by Anonymous on Jun. 2, 2014 at 12:01 PM
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Replies (1-10):
marmie41
by Bronze Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 12:03 PM
Theses are questions that need to be addressed with the school system she will be attending.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 2 on Jun. 2, 2014 at 12:10 PM
3 moms liked this

I would harp on her to not eat something from anyone else.  She has to learn.  I would send her lunches every day and not rely on the school.  Our schools had peanut free tables too but not peanut free schools.  Neighbor kids learned at a young age, younger than yours that they couldn't eat things from other kids.  Your child needs to be proactive because life is life and this is something she will have to deal with her whole life. 

NDADanceMom
by on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:08 PM
Every school is different. Some schools do not allow kids to eat peanut products for breakfast before school at home. No peanut products at school of course either. Other schools say your allergy, your problem.
Our school has the teachers or lunch aide wipe down the lunch table and chair with Lysol wipes when a student with allergies comes in. That table then becomes the peanut free table or whatever else a child is allergic to free table . The class where the child is at for the year is peanut free and has an epi pen in it.
Our district feels like this should be enough and if it isn't, public school probably isn't for your child. The needs of one are important but trying to make everyone in a building compliant to extreme rules isn't realistic and would give a false sense of security.
Anonymous
by Anonymous 3 on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:11 PM
1 mom liked this

I think you should teach your child not to take any food other people/kids than what you give her just to be on the safe side. 

Anonymous
by Anonymous 1 - Original Poster on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:23 PM
I agree with you 100%

I'm teaching my dd that the world doesn't revolve around her nor will stop for her and she has to be in charge of her condition.

The schools here are not peanut free but there is a nurse who will keep the epi pen and other medicines she might need (hopefully, she will never need them).

I read an article of a study done by some well known school (can't recall the name) in which they believe the peanut free environment posses a bigger risk for an allergy kid than no peanut free. It creates a false sense of security and then is when the accident happens.

Quoting NDADanceMom: Every school is different. Some schools do not allow kids to eat peanut products for breakfast before school at home. No peanut products at school of course either. Other schools say your allergy, your problem.
Our school has the teachers or lunch aide wipe down the lunch table and chair with Lysol wipes when a student with allergies comes in. That table then becomes the peanut free table or whatever else a child is allergic to free table . The class where the child is at for the year is peanut free and has an epi pen in it.
Our district feels like this should be enough and if it isn't, public school probably isn't for your child. The needs of one are important but trying to make everyone in a building compliant to extreme rules isn't realistic and would give a false sense of security.
NDADanceMom
by on Jun. 2, 2014 at 1:29 PM
2 moms liked this
I taught my daughter the same thing about her diabetes. In elementary school I had a button made for her that said "I have type 1 diabetes! Please ask the school nurse for tips on how to help"
I had her wear it for the first week of school and then keep it on the teachers desk for when there was a sub.


Quoting Anonymous: I agree with you 100%

I'm teaching my dd that the world doesn't revolve around her nor will stop for her and she has to be in charge of her condition.

The schools here are not peanut free but there is a nurse who will keep the epi pen and other medicines she might need (hopefully, she will never need them).

I read an article of a study done by some well known school (can't recall the name) in which they believe the peanut free environment posses a bigger risk for an allergy kid than no peanut free. It creates a false sense of security and then is when the accident happens.

Quoting NDADanceMom: Every school is different. Some schools do not allow kids to eat peanut products for breakfast before school at home. No peanut products at school of course either. Other schools say your allergy, your problem.
Our school has the teachers or lunch aide wipe down the lunch table and chair with Lysol wipes when a student with allergies comes in. That table then becomes the peanut free table or whatever else a child is allergic to free table . The class where the child is at for the year is peanut free and has an epi pen in it.
Our district feels like this should be enough and if it isn't, public school probably isn't for your child. The needs of one are important but trying to make everyone in a building compliant to extreme rules isn't realistic and would give a false sense of security.
GraysonsMom_
by on Jun. 2, 2014 at 5:29 PM
as long as your daughter and her teachers are aware of the severity of her allergy I think it will be handled well. Also the school should have a menu out every week, maybe in the paper, so you should be able to know what she will he having every day and can plan accordingly.
mariesmama
by Bronze Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 5:55 PM

you will probably need to get her an epipen the school nusrse keeps it and its a peanut free classroom b the snacks gotta be peanut free its a public school pre-k program she will start kindergarden this fall

Lorelai_Nicole
by Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 6:10 PM
I would see what you can do about having the teacher keep an epi pen in the classroom. With serious allergies--I'm sure you already know this, so please don't think I'm talking down to you, because I don't mean to be--the time it takes to go to the nurse is valuable time lost. Depending on the distance between the classroom and the nurse's office, it could be a life-or-death difference.
thefiregoddess
by Member on Jun. 2, 2014 at 6:13 PM
It varies from school to school but you need to ask how far away from the lunch room epi pens are kept, who is trained to spot severe reactions and if she would have to administer her own.

I was severely allergic to many things as a child, back before food bans in school. My mother came to school with me the first day, pointed out what I could and could not have, introduced me to the lunch aids, we walked the route to the nurses office and reviewed how to use the pen.

I was 5. She did it every time my epi script was renewed too. I was taught never to trade, share, accept food items or even use the same water fountain. (I had to go to the nurse and get water from the cooler, I was that allergic)

Never once did I have a reaction at school. No one was responsible for me eating but me.

Lesson of the story, do not rely on others to supervise your childs eating and allergies even if its their job. Teach personal responsibility, act like it's only you and them.

Kids catch on to allergies more than you think, especially if they have had a reaction before.. They remember and its not fun.
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