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I hate to say that this post is not about POT HEAD MOMS!

Posted by on Apr. 2, 2008 at 11:38 PM
  • 16 Replies

Sorry,,,,you wont polls, questions or etc.. about POT, However I want to talk about "special needs" children...It is "world autism awarness day"....Have you done anything? I want to tell you moms that Autism is not contagious and your kids will NEVER catch this from my kids,,,So do me and the rest of us a favor and educate before you speculate,,,,,,

by on Apr. 2, 2008 at 11:38 PM
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Replies (1-10):
mommy2-3kiddos
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 1:14 AM
Just out of curiosity do you get that a lot?  My son & 2 of my cousins have some level of ASD & to my knowledge none have experienced that kind of reaction....

Good luck to you, you're doing a wonderful thing promoting awareness!!!!
cozykitchen
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 1:25 AM
Angie are there  major symptoms of Autisim ?
Is it still considered prodominantly a male issue?
Are there stantard treatments ?
Can you give those  of us who might have preconcieved notions a bullet  discription of  a person with Autisim ?
AnjeloAntonio
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 1:31 AM
i have been doing alot of reading on the subject i have a 7week old and i am terrified to get him vaccinated and terrified not to the more i learn the more confused i get
SabbyMommy
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 5:39 AM
I have a really good friend who was severely Autistic when he was younger. He's 23 now, has a lot of friends, and actually just got married two weeks ago! He's got a normal job, has a car, lives a pretty much normal life. You have to know him to know he's got Autism. Sometimes he can be a little difficult, but he's come a long way since he was a child, and even in the last 4 years since I've known him.

There is hope!!! Don't ever let a doctor (or anyone else for that matter) tell you that there is no chance of your wonderfully special child living a normal life. People like my friend give me hope for the rest of the children (an even for my family if my child should have a disability once it's born) in the world, and makes it impossible for other people to use a disability as an excuse.

Warm wishes and High hopes to all the mommies of these wonderful little treasures out there. I know it can be so difficult some times, but at other times, your child can bring you the greatest joy in the world.

cure4cf
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 5:51 AM
Here is something I found on an autism website. I found some more symptoms like uneven/gross fine motor skills, lack of response to verbal stimulus, displaying extreme distress for no appearant reason, unwilling to adapt to slight change, abnormal ways of relating to people objects & events

Here are some signs to look for in the children in your life:

  • Lack of or delay in spoken language
  • Repetitive use of language and/or motor mannerisms (e.g., hand-flapping, twirling objects)
  • Little or no eye contact
  • Lack of interest in peer relationships
  • Lack of spontaneous or make-believe play
  • Persistent fixation on parts of objects

Bobbi

Mommy to 2 beautiful girls Holly 5 years old & Isabel 2 years old

 

 

tvschiulaz
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 11:27 AM
Hey Angie:  I am more than willing to discuss children of special needs, but autism is not the only disease out there that labels a child "special needs."

My daughter has a neurological condition called neruofibromatosis.  This illness was inherited from her father; it has caused issues with her skeleton and nerve damage in her vocal chords (she has a trach) and ankles (she wears orthotics).  She also has severe scoliosis (she is only 6-it started at 2) which is supported with a back brace.  However, we are now at a point where surgery has to be done (I found out yesterday) and am now in the process of getting a 2nd opinion.

How is that for special needs?

Vicky
emily351982
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 11:36 AM
I thought I'd post this here.  It was posted by my friend, the mom of an autistic student that I worked with.


BLESSED ARE THOSE

I. Blessed are those who stop and listen to my chatter. You may not understand me; but I love when people talk to me, for I long for companionship, too.





II. Blessed are those who take my hand and walk with me when the path is rough, for I easily stumble and grow weary. But thank you, too, for letting me walk alone when the path is smooth, for I must learn independence.





III. Blessed are those who take the time to tell me about special happenings, for unless you make special effort to inform me, I remain ignorant.





IV. Blessed are those who wait for me. I may be slow, but I appreciate your patience.





V. Blessed are those who are not ashamed to be seen in public with me, for I did not choose to be born thus. It could have been you as well.





VI. Blessed are those who do not pity me, for I don't want pity. All I want is understanding and respect for what I have learned as well.





VII. Blessed are those who notice my accomplishments, small as they may seem to you. I must work long and hard to learn many of the things you take for granted.





VIII. Blessed are those who include me in their games, even though I may not understand the rules, I still like to be included in your activities.





IX. Blessed are those who think of me as a person who loves, and hurts, and feels joy and pain just like you do, for in that respect I am normal.





Author Unknown

  Make $$ doing surveys, completing offers, etc. http://cashcrate.com/345060

emily351982
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 11:41 AM

Quoting tvschiulaz:

Hey Angie:  I am more than willing to discuss children of special needs, but autism is not the only disease out there that labels a child "special needs."

My daughter has a neurological condition called neruofibromatosis.  This illness was inherited from her father; it has caused issues with her skeleton and nerve damage in her vocal chords (she has a trach) and ankles (she wears orthotics).  She also has severe scoliosis (she is only 6-it started at 2) which is supported with a back brace.  However, we are now at a point where surgery has to be done (I found out yesterday) and am now in the process of getting a 2nd opinion.

How is that for special needs?

Vicky
I agree, there are many other special needs conditions besides autism.  I think all of the hype about autism lately is because it's finally becoming more known b/c the amount of cases are increasing so much.  My dad is a special education teacher.  My brother has many problems with learning, socially, and mentally...he actually might have aspergers (along with lots of other things such as Tourette's syndrome, OCD, Manic Depression, etc).  I also had an Uncle with Down's who recently passed.  I'm just glad people are educating themselves on this b/c maybe they will have more consideration for people who are different and have special needs.  My brother has always been treated horribly.  He's 23 yrs old and I just feel so bad for him b/c people just really don't understand so they treat him differently and he can see that.

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mommy2-3kiddos
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 11:42 AM
The PP made me think of this....someone gave this to me after ds was diagnosed....always loved it.



Welcome To Holland     
       by
       Emily Perl Kingsley.
I am often asked to describe the experience of raising a child with a disability - to try to help people who have not shared that unique experience to understand it, to imagine how it would feel. It's like this......
      When you're going to have a baby, it's like planning a fabulous vacation trip - to Italy. You buy a bunch of guide books and make your wonderful plans. The Coliseum. The Michelangelo David. The gondolas in Venice. You may learn some handy phrases in Italian. It's all very exciting.
      After months of eager anticipation, the day finally arrives. You pack your bags and off you go.
      Several hours later, the plane lands. The stewardess comes in and says, "Welcome to Holland."
      "Holland?!?" you say. "What do you mean Holland?? I signed up for Italy! I'm supposed to be in Italy. All my life I've dreamed of going to Italy."
      But there's been a change in the flight plan. They've landed in Holland and there you must stay.
      The important thing is that they haven't taken you to a horrible, disgusting, filthy place, full of pestilence, famine and disease. It's just a different place.
      So you must go out and buy new guide books. And you must learn a whole new language. And you will meet a whole new group of people you would never have met.
      It's just a different place. It's slower-paced than Italy, less flashy than Italy. But after you've been there for a while and you catch your breath, you look around.... and you begin to notice that Holland has windmills....and Holland has tulips. Holland even has Rembrandts.
      But everyone you know is busy coming and going from Italy... and they're all bragging about what a wonderful time they had there. And for the rest of your life, you will say "Yes, that's where I was supposed to go. That's what I had planned."
      But... if you spend your life mourning the fact that you didn't get to Italy, you may never be free to enjoy the very special, the very lovely things ..... about Holland.
c1987 by Emily Perl Kingsley. All rights reserved
SStankiewicz721
by on Apr. 3, 2008 at 11:43 AM
Have you read Jenny McCarthys book? her son is autistic and shes done such a fabulous job with it!  I would research more on her, shes really working hard for the cause.
Sylvain's Mommy
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