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Can Stress Cause Early Labor?

Posted by on Jun. 9, 2009 at 12:22 PM
  • 2 Replies

I'm 26 weeks pregnant and I've been SOOOOOOOO stressed out.

I was wondering if stress could cause early labor.





its a girl expecting girl

I vax, I circ, I FF, I'm pro-circumstance, I forward-face at recommended, I use booster seats now, I don't believe in God. Anything else you wanna know?

by on Jun. 9, 2009 at 12:22 PM
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Nic_Stayin_Stng
by on Jun. 9, 2009 at 12:50 PM

YES!!!

It causes hormones that can induce early labor quite easily.  That's why they invented "bed rest".  lol  When I was pregnant with my youngest, I nearly lost him multiple times because my (now) ex was cheating on me and treating me like dirt.  My doctor actually had to call him and ask him if he wanted his baby dead.  Please calm down.  Everything will be ok.  I promise!

monshine2
by Silver Member on Jun. 9, 2009 at 12:57 PM

 Here is an excerpt from something I found online:
http://www.marchofdimes.com/prematurity/21326_27538.asp

What types of stress may contribute to premature delivery?
The routine everyday stresses that we all face, such as work deadlines and traffic delays, probably don't contribute much to premature birth. It's important to keep in mind that stress is not all bad. When managed properly, a little stress can provide us with the drive to meet new challenges.

But certain types of severe or long-lasting stress may pose a risk in pregnancy. Some studies suggest that women who experience negative life events, such as divorce, death in the family, serious illness or loss of a job, may be at increased risk of premature delivery (1). It is important to remember that while these sorts of stress may increase the risk of a premature birth, most women who experience these sorts of stress do not deliver prematurely.

Women who experience a catastrophic event during pregnancy may be at increased risk for premature delivery. One study found that pregnant women who worked within two miles of the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001, had significantly shorter gestations than women who worked farther from the site (1). Another study found that pregnant women who experienced a major earthquake had shorter gestations (1).

The timing of the event may also influence pregnancy outcome. Studies suggest that women who experienced the World Trade Center attack or an earthquake in the first trimester of pregnancy tended to deliver earlier than women who experienced these catastrophic events later in pregnancy (1).

Chronic stress may play a role in premature delivery. For example, studies suggest that women who are homeless or have serious financial problems may be more likely to deliver prematurely (1). Working outside the home has not been linked to premature birth in most studies. However, women who find their jobs especially physically or emotionally stressful may face some risk (1).

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