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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Ask The Teacher.....

Posted by on May. 24, 2010 at 12:02 AM
  • 899 Replies

I thought this might be fun or interesting. I am an elementary school teacher certified in K-6th grade. I want to offer to answer any questions you may have ever wanted to ask a teacher. No rules, ANYTHING and EVERYTHING is allowed don't be afraid. Ask away....

Educators helping me with this thread are: 

*Sarahjoy

*Staysinvegas

*Maxswolfsuit

Please PM me if your question goes unanswered as sometimes they're accidentally overlooked. Thanks!

by on May. 24, 2010 at 12:02 AM
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Replies (1-10):
momma0ffive
by on May. 24, 2010 at 12:04 AM

do or did u ever favor one student over another

momma0ffive
by on May. 24, 2010 at 12:05 AM

if you got info about a student from another teacher like a heads up, do u judghe tht student when he came to your class or just see for yourself how he really was

mom0092
by on May. 24, 2010 at 12:36 AM


Quoting momma0ffive:

do or did u ever favor one student over another

Good question.

No, absolutely not. I like to think of my students as my own children. For seven hours a day, I am basically "Mom" for my students. Although, I try to be as fair as I can be, there are certain factors that come in to play on how lenient I might be with one student over another. For example I may be a bit more firm with a student who has constant behavioral problems Vs. a student who has generally good behavior. I know there's teachers who do play "favorites" but it's few. Remember that the story you get is what your kiddo wants you to hear and they'll distort details to not get in trouble. :)

Keep the questions coming!

mom0092
by on May. 24, 2010 at 12:43 AM


Quoting momma0ffive:

if you got info about a student from another teacher like a heads up, do u judghe tht student when he came to your class or just see for yourself how he really was

I like this question.

Information about students really travels within the school, more often the information I get isn't from other teachers but from other students. If I receive "heads up" on a particular student, I don't let that impact how I treat that student but it does impact how closely I might watch that student until I get to know him or her.  I let each student start on a clean slate. Even if they have earned a bad reputation in my classroom, I still offer a clean slate because it's hard to be motivated to change bad behavior if you feel like the teacher holds it against you.

0123456
by on May. 24, 2010 at 3:54 AM

My three-year-old daughter is reading on a late first grade level. (No, it's not just memorized. She understands phonics rules, etc. I'm basing that on books that she can read with absolutely no help at all and looking them up on scholastic.com to get the grade level. She can read some harder, but I would say late first is her comfortable average. She can read 100 percent of the Dolch words, every list.) She is also extremely shy, so I would have to be her advocate.

Would I be "that mom?" Would her needs truly be met in a public school kindergarten or 1st grade classroom? She would not be a good fit for going to another class for a subject. She has never clicked with her same-age peers, but she gets along great with those that are about 1 1/2 to 2 years older. She's already going to be a young one with an early summer birthday, so a grade skip doesn't seem like a great idea either. 

rkoloms
by on May. 24, 2010 at 6:13 AM


Quoting 0123456:

My three-year-old daughter is reading on a late first grade level. (No, it's not just memorized. She understands phonics rules, etc. I'm basing that on books that she can read with absolutely no help at all and looking them up on scholastic.com to get the grade level. She can read some harder, but I would say late first is her comfortable average. She can read 100 percent of the Dolch words, every list.) She is also extremely shy, so I would have to be her advocate.

Would I be "that mom?" Would her needs truly be met in a public school kindergarten or 1st grade classroom? She would not be a good fit for going to another class for a subject. She has never clicked with her same-age peers, but she gets along great with those that are about 1 1/2 to 2 years older. She's already going to be a young one with an early summer birthday, so a grade skip doesn't seem like a great idea either. 

I'm going to jump in here. Start looking into academically advanced programs in your area. If you are in Chicago, I will be happy to help you navigate the school system.

It is so important to keep those little minds intellectually stimulated. This is a great site for enrichment classes and other resources.

When my daughter (with a late August birthday) finally switched from a "regular" school to an academically advanced school, her classmates were definitely more mature. She loved (well, still does) the challenging academics and competitive nature of school.

Feel free to ask me any questions; you may also want to join one of the CafeMom groups for moms with gifted kids; sometimes it can be hard to talk to your friends about your child's achievements and challenges.

Robin in Chicago

mom0092
by on May. 24, 2010 at 8:54 AM


Quoting 0123456:

My three-year-old daughter is reading on a late first grade level. (No, it's not just memorized. She understands phonics rules, etc. I'm basing that on books that she can read with absolutely no help at all and looking them up on scholastic.com to get the grade level. She can read some harder, but I would say late first is her comfortable average. She can read 100 percent of the Dolch words, every list.) She is also extremely shy, so I would have to be her advocate.

Would I be "that mom?" Would her needs truly be met in a public school kindergarten or 1st grade classroom? She would not be a good fit for going to another class for a subject. She has never clicked with her same-age peers, but she gets along great with those that are about 1 1/2 to 2 years older. She's already going to be a young one with an early summer birthday, so a grade skip doesn't seem like a great idea either. 

Go ahead and look into your local school district to see what services they can offer your child. The availability of gifted services varies from state-to-state and within local districts. Most public districts would not like the idea of her being in kindergarten if she is younger than the required age. Also remember that even if she is an excellent reader, the other subjects matter also. My 3rd grade son reads on a sixth grade level but he struggles with math. I don't know what is available to you but in my opinion, she would probably do best in regular classes until maybe 1st or 2nd grade and then possibly taking some gifted reading classes. Most school districts aren't too hot on the idea of skipping a grade. Let me know if I didn't answer a specific question for you. :)

kmrtigger
by Kandice on May. 24, 2010 at 9:02 AM

 Wow! Thanks for offering to let the ladies ask you questions.

eilenej1
by on May. 24, 2010 at 9:24 AM

I'd like to expand on this question and your reply.  Word does spread about students and it seems that it is usually behavior related.  If you are receiving word about students from other teachers, do you feel it is helpful information or just complaints?  For example, are they blowing off steam or are they providing useful information to you as that student's future teacher?  I ask because I have a kid with ADHD who also possibly has Asperger's.  It is expected that he require more attention for his problems.  In our elementary, teachers share information and have a big role in determining the next year's class make-up.

Quoting mom0092:


Quoting momma0ffive:

if you got info about a student from another teacher like a heads up, do u judghe tht student when he came to your class or just see for yourself how he really was

I like this question.

Information about students really travels within the school, more often the information I get isn't from other teachers but from other students. If I receive "heads up" on a particular student, I don't let that impact how I treat that student but it does impact how closely I might watch that student until I get to know him or her.  I let each student start on a clean slate. Even if they have earned a bad reputation in my classroom, I still offer a clean slate because it's hard to be motivated to change bad behavior if you feel like the teacher holds it against you.


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Barabell
by Barbara on May. 24, 2010 at 11:24 AM

What are your thoughts on No Child Left Behind?  Are your thoughts similar to what your peers around you think?

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