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OT but very interesting

Posted by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 10:22 AM
  • 9 Replies

So to all of us nonmilitary wives or just ones who have no clue. Have you ever noticed that the flags are backwards on Army uniforms? Well I did and here is the reason why.

Question: Why is the U.S. flag worn "backwards" on the uniform?
Answer: Army Regulation 670-1, Wear and Appearance of Army Uniforms and Insignia, is the governing authority for the wear of Army uniforms. Paragraph 28-18 governs the wear of the United States Flag on Army Uniforms.

The flag may only be worn on the utility and organizational uniforms (such as the camouflage BDU). The flag may only be worn during joint-duty and multinational deployments. When the servicemember returns to home station, the flag must be removed. (Guide Note: A message went out in February 2004 changing this restriction, and making the U.S. Flag a mandatory uniform componant for all soldiers, effective October 1, 2005).

Chapter 1, Title 4, United States Code, provides for the design of the U.S. flag and specifies the colors as red, white, and blue. Colors other than red, white, and blue violate the U.S. Code; therefore, subdued-colored flags are not authorized for wear. Joint commanders have to make the decision as to whether or not the wear of a full-color flag, for morale purposes, is more important than having all aspects of the uniform camouflaged.

When approved for wear, the full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is sewn 1/2 inch below the right shoulder seam of the temperate, hot-weather, enhanced hot-weather, and desert BDU; the BDU field jacket; and the cold-weather uniform. The flag is worn on the right shoulder, because, in the military, the "place of honor" is to a military member's right.

The full-color U.S. flag cloth replica is worn so that the star field faces forward, or to the flag’s own right. When worn in this manner, the flag is facing to the observer’s right, and gives the effect of the flag flying in the breeze as the wearer moves forward.

The rule dates back to the Army's early history, when both mounted cavalry and infantry units would designate a standard bearer, who carried the Colors into battle. As he charged, his forward momentum caused the flag to stream back. Since the Stars and Stripes are mounted with the canton closest to the pole, that section stayed to the right, while the stripes flew to the left.

by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 10:22 AM
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Replies (1-9):
Barabell
by Barbara on Mar. 28, 2011 at 10:35 AM

Interesting!  Thanks for sharing.

natesmom1228
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 10:36 AM

Thanks for the info.

auroragold
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 10:41 AM

 Interesting bit of trivia.

In truth, I never noticed and now I'll have to look!

Think I can get some young cute army guy to stand still so I can examine????????  (wink wink)

Jess1231
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 10:54 AM
Interesting!
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
wakymom
by Ruby Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:28 AM

Hm, did  not know that. Thanks for sharing.

 

 

 

 

 


 

kmrtigger
by Kandice on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:39 AM

I learned about this in school. Our history teacher was awesome about teaching us things not in the book. Thanks for the reminder.

steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:39 AM

 I'm a dork and knew that.  My dad is a Vietnam vet and has always been into the flag and flag trivia.  So I've learned quite a bit over the years.

Radarma
by on Mar. 28, 2011 at 11:47 AM

I love random facts...THANKS!

soymujer
by Mikki on Mar. 28, 2011 at 12:22 PM

I knew that because of my FIL...

family in the van   Mom of four


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