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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Ask the Expert: Your bedwetting questions answered!

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Thank you so much to our expert for answering our questions! We are no longer taking questions, but be sure to read through all the answers.


Does your child wet the bed? Does your son or daughter still have daytime accidents? Whether your kid isa regular bedwetter, or just has occasional accidents, we're sure you're eager to learn how to stop it!

We're excited to announce that Renee Mercer will be joining us to answer all your bedwetting questions!

Renee is a pediatric nurse practitioner who specializes in treating children with bedwetting problems. She is author of "Seven Steps to Nighttime Dryness: A Practical Guide for Parents of Children with Bedwetting" and owner and founder of Bedwetting Store.

Renee will be in the group from April 9 to 20 to answer your questions.

Post your questions now in the replies below!

by on Apr. 6, 2012 at 11:56 AM
Replies (21-30):
Schleetle
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 1:48 PM
My son is 9 he wets the bed every single night, and not a little. We've tried limiting what he drinks in the evenings, setting an alarm in the middle of the night, waking him ourselves at night, and even medication. Nothing has helped (the medicine worked for about two weeks) because even waking him twice at night he'd still wake up wet. He wears Goodnite pants at bedtime, and every morning they are soaked even sometimes through into his clothes/sheets. I don't know what else we can try... Do you have any suggestions?
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Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 1:56 PM


Quoting lynettemommie4:

My son is 9 and has been a bedwetter since he was potty trained. We have restricted liquids. woke him up in the middle of the night. He isn't too bad right now. maybe a few nights every few weeks that i know of. He has been waking up really early and taking a bath and putting clean clothes on. My youngest wets the bed on occasion. she is five.

It sounds like he is making progress. Make sure he voids twice in the 30 minutes before bed and gets enough sleep.  Being overly tired and drinking late in the day can contirbute to wetting.  Make sure he drinks well during the day so he isn't so thirsty later.

Your five year old is right on track.  15% of kids her age will still have a few accidents.

Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 2:00 PM


Quoting swmmra:

I know that I am not a specialist by anyway, but I was still wetting the bed at 12. My mom took me to a urilogist (sp) and they gave us a sensor to sew into my underwear, and a buzzer to sew into the shoulder of my sleep shirts. When the sensor got wet, the buzzer would go off and wake me up. It worked really well at teaching me to understand when I was asleep and needed to go. I used it for a while and have had no problems since. 

Good for you!  Bedwetting alarms continue to be the most effective way for kids to learn to stay dry.  That particular alarm is no longer being made but there are many other kid-friendly alarms that don't require any sewing.

Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 2:08 PM
1 mom liked this

Bedwetting alarms have a 80% success rate so are the most successful cure for bedwetting.  He needs to develop the ability to wake up when his bladder is full and walk to the bathroom.  Bedwetting alarms sense the wetness and sound/vibrate to alert him and you that he is wetting,  Over time, his body learns to stop the urine in response to the sound and get up.  I don't know when you're gling to Disney, but the average child takes 10-12 weeks to get to dryness using an alarm.  If you start now, he'll be much improved by summer.

Quoting cathte:

I was wondering do those " alarms" for bed setters really work? My DS is 9. He wets sheet and top comforter nightly. Is the any way to at least curb the wetting and protect the comforter?
I am afraid when we go to Disney, he is going to wet the comforter daily!!!
Thanks!


Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 2:15 PM

Setting an alarm clock or waking him on your schedule does not help him to wake up when he physiologically needs to go to the bathroom,  That time changes every night and you have no way of knowing when it will be.  Using a bedwetting alarm will be a great solution for him.  Since it senses moisture, it will sound exactly at the right time.  It will enable him (and you) to know when he needs to get up.  He can begin to put together the feeling of a full bladder and waking up to urinate.  When the alarm sounds, make sure he responds properly by turning it off, then walking to the bathroom.  My book "Seven Steps to Nighttime Dryness" decribes this at length.

Quoting Schleetle:

My son is 9 he wets the bed every single night, and not a little. We've tried limiting what he drinks in the evenings, setting an alarm in the middle of the night, waking him ourselves at night, and even medication. Nothing has helped (the medicine worked for about two weeks) because even waking him twice at night he'd still wake up wet. He wears Goodnite pants at bedtime, and every morning they are soaked even sometimes through into his clothes/sheets. I don't know what else we can try... Do you have any suggestions?


Schleetle
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 3:26 PM
Thanks!

Quoting Renee_Mercer:

Setting an alarm clock or waking him on your schedule does not help him to wake up when he physiologically needs to go to the bathroom,  That time changes every night and you have no way of knowing when it will be.  Using a bedwetting alarm will be a great solution for him.  Since it senses moisture, it will sound exactly at the right time.  It will enable him (and you) to know when he needs to get up.  He can begin to put together the feeling of a full bladder and waking up to urinate.  When the alarm sounds, make sure he responds properly by turning it off, then walking to the bathroom.  My book "Seven Steps to Nighttime Dryness" decribes this at length.


Quoting Schleetle:

My son is 9 he wets the bed every single night, and not a little. We've tried limiting what he drinks in the evenings, setting an alarm in the middle of the night, waking him ourselves at night, and even medication. Nothing has helped (the medicine worked for about two weeks) because even waking him twice at night he'd still wake up wet. He wears Goodnite pants at bedtime, and every morning they are soaked even sometimes through into his clothes/sheets. I don't know what else we can try... Do you have any suggestions?


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EbEeBe103
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 9:48 PM
My sons doctor told me it all has to do the parents. If we did it he will do it. My husband and im putting him out there had that problem until he was 7 our son is 5 and it got to a point that we had to buy night time pullups. I was washing way to much. LoL
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robertmommie
by on Apr. 11, 2012 at 10:10 PM

My 4 (turned 4 in March) sometimes pees during the night, so he wears pull ups for bed time.  At what age should I consider bed wetting alarms?  If it comes to that.

jento1
by on Apr. 12, 2012 at 10:17 AM

My question is....how can you help a child stop if she isnt even motivated to do so?  My daughter is 7 and wets the bed EVERY single night no matter what I try or dont try.  Our rule here is that she needs to go potty before bed or at least try to go potty but she flat out refuses to even try.  I have to fight with her over something as easy as going potty!!  I have to watch her like a hawk because she will sneak drinks past 6:30 which will make her not only wet the bed but flood it.  She wont help me in the morning with her sheets ant bedding (I was advised to have her start helping me in the morning to make her reaponsible for it, but not as a punishment) but, she will fight me tooth and nail and wont even attempt to help.  Fighting with her first thing in the morning is not fun at all.  So, my question is...if she isnt the least bit motivated to even want to stop or help herself stop for that matter, what can I do if anything to try to help??  All my efforts wont do anything if she wont make the effort.  I am tired of fighting and arguing with her over the simple task of going potty.  HELP!!!

Jennifer

Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 12, 2012 at 10:41 AM

It sounds like your son is progressing in the right direction.  I'm assuming that he stays dry on the nights he can hold it all night and wets on the nights that he should be getting up to empty his bladder.  It takes longer for some kids to put this all together.  Using a washable waterproof mattress overlay will help with clean up.  If he's in a stretch of wetting every night, you could walk him to the bathroom when you go to bed.  Urinating twice in the 30 minutes before bed may help.  Also, making sure he has regular bowel movements is important.  Kids with infrequent stools can't hold as much urine at a time.  If this intermittent pattern doesn't seem to improve over the next few months, you could use a bedwetting alarm to help him learn to wake up to urinate on the nights that he should be doing that. 

Quoting e_massa83:

My son is 6 and is still wetting the bed. it wont happen every night but it happens a lot. it seems like he will be dry for a week maybe even two and then he will wet every night for a week. i cut the drinks off and make him go to the bathroom before he goes to bed but he still wets. Just wondering if i should be worried. I myself had a bed wetting problem till i was about 11 then was put on this nasal spray medicine (not sure what it was called) and after that didn't have any more problems. any advice or suggestions would be very helpful. thanks.


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