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Ask the Expert: Your bedwetting questions answered!

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Thank you so much to our expert for answering our questions! We are no longer taking questions, but be sure to read through all the answers.


Does your child wet the bed? Does your son or daughter still have daytime accidents? Whether your kid isa regular bedwetter, or just has occasional accidents, we're sure you're eager to learn how to stop it!

We're excited to announce that Renee Mercer will be joining us to answer all your bedwetting questions!

Renee is a pediatric nurse practitioner who specializes in treating children with bedwetting problems. She is author of "Seven Steps to Nighttime Dryness: A Practical Guide for Parents of Children with Bedwetting" and owner and founder of Bedwetting Store.

Renee will be in the group from April 9 to 20 to answer your questions.

Post your questions now in the replies below!

by on Apr. 6, 2012 at 11:56 AM
Replies (61-70):
alexis_06
by on Apr. 16, 2012 at 6:46 PM

 My daughter is gonna be 8 in 2 weeks, and still wets the bed.  She was potty trained by 2..and from age 2-4 she was fine at night, then all of a sudden she started peeing, i thought (hoped) it was a phase, but nope! she went to the dr to get all checked out when she was 6 (thought maybe she had an infection) but she was fine.  she doesnt have anything to drink after 530, she pees after supper, before her shower and then again before bed.  shes in bed by 8pm..i have tried setting an alarm clock for her, she sleeps right thru it!!  if no one gets her up to go to the bathroom, she WILL pee her bed.  but it seems it only happens within the first 2-2.5hrs of her getting to sleep.  i have no problem getting her up to go...but its more or less the thought of "i shouldnt HAVE to do this still......"  ya know?!!?  i just dont know what to do...shes getting to the point of wanting to have sleepovers now with her friends, she has been on 2..and both times im up all night worried that she peed her bed....its so stressfull!!  shes to embarrased to wear the 'goodnights' at a sleepover.  i know she hates it when this happens, i dont blame her for it either.  i know its out of her control, but what can i do??  is it cuz her dad is in and out of her life (he was only involved from age 3-5.5), could him having diabetes be a factor?? (he is insulin dependant, has been since he was young) . is it a small bladder??  shes in a deep sleep?? what can i do to help her??  thanks for your time! :)

Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 17, 2012 at 9:08 AM

It is true that kids with ADHD have a higher incidence of wetting problems.  We don't know exactly why.  I would concentrate on getting him dry in the daytime and let him wear pullups at night for now.  Make sure he has alot to drink in the daytime so he doesn't feel as thirsty in the evening.  Would he consider wearing a discreet vibratory reminder watch in the daytime?  Since some of the kids ignore messages that come from their bladder, having a 20 second vibratory reminder come from a watch can help him void at a regular interval of time.  You set the watch for about every 2 hours (more or less depending on his bladder capacity).  When it vibrates, his job is to go to the bathroom, whether he feels like it or not.  (If he won't wear it, you or a caretaker could use it.) You can reward cooperation, which is something he has control over.  Wet pants become less frequent since he empties his bladder regularly and does not allow it to become overfull and leak.  There are also discreet washable waterproof underwear that can be used in the daytime  to prevent urine leaking out to his clothes.

http://bedwettingstore.com/vibralite-12-vibrating-watch.html

http://bedwettingstore.com/daytime-washables.html


Quoting lupie_ladybug:

My son is 4(going to be 5 in June.) He has problems during the day and at night but also has ADHD and ODD. His psychologist says that it is not uncommon for ADHD patients to experience accidents even frequently. I have been trying with him and not making a big deal out of it at night but the daytime has got to stop. I can't stand having to wash evterything all the time and the urine smells and makes him smell. I just don't know what to do and he would not wear one of those alarms, I can pretty much guarantee that. Other than blaming it on his disorders, the drs haven't given me much as far as advice except to make it a big issue. When he wets the bed have him get up at night and get a shower, change, etc. I've limited his drinks(he also has an obsession with drinking and has gone as far as stealing water from the sinks and using decor around the house as cups lol(that was only once though.) I've tried the positive reinforcement and coaching routine which has helped some but not entirely. He is so hyper/on the go constantly and the defiance from the ODD makes him stubborn that he just doesn't realize to go before he's ready to pee on himself. Anyone have these issues?? Any advice??

-LB


Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 17, 2012 at 9:58 AM

Her wetting most likely does not have to do with her intermittent relationship with her dad.  It sounds like she was checked for diabetes (a simple urine test screens for it) so her dad having diabetes is not a factor.  Having a small bladder capacity, being a sound sleeper and having a family history of bedwetting all do play a role.  The problem with setting an alarm clock or walking her to the bathroom when you're up is that there is no way to predict exactly when her body will need to urinate.  A bedwetting alarm is a better solution because it senses the wettness and sounds exactly when she needs to urinate.  She will sleep through the sound initially so you should go to her room and remind her to get up and walk to the bathroom.  Even if she has completely emptied her bladder in her bed, she should still walk to the bathroom and try to urinate.  Over time, her body will begin to make the brain-bladder connection and will wake her spontaneously before she wets.

http://bedwettingstore.com/sleep-dry-solution-for-girls.html

Quoting alexis_06:

 My daughter is gonna be 8 in 2 weeks, and still wets the bed.  She was potty trained by 2..and from age 2-4 she was fine at night, then all of a sudden she started peeing, i thought (hoped) it was a phase, but nope! she went to the dr to get all checked out when she was 6 (thought maybe she had an infection) but she was fine.  she doesnt have anything to drink after 530, she pees after supper, before her shower and then again before bed.  shes in bed by 8pm..i have tried setting an alarm clock for her, she sleeps right thru it!!  if no one gets her up to go to the bathroom, she WILL pee her bed.  but it seems it only happens within the first 2-2.5hrs of her getting to sleep.  i have no problem getting her up to go...but its more or less the thought of "i shouldnt HAVE to do this still......"  ya know?!!?  i just dont know what to do...shes getting to the point of wanting to have sleepovers now with her friends, she has been on 2..and both times im up all night worried that she peed her bed....its so stressfull!!  shes to embarrased to wear the 'goodnights' at a sleepover.  i know she hates it when this happens, i dont blame her for it either.  i know its out of her control, but what can i do??  is it cuz her dad is in and out of her life (he was only involved from age 3-5.5), could him having diabetes be a factor?? (he is insulin dependant, has been since he was young) . is it a small bladder??  shes in a deep sleep?? what can i do to help her??  thanks for your time! :)


Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 17, 2012 at 10:09 AM

I think this is a good time to introduce a "tool" to help her learn to wake up to a full bladder.  If you've read any other posts, you know that I recommend bedwetting alarms as an effective tool to alert her (and you) when the wetting occurs.  This tool helps her put together the brain-bladder connection so that she will learn to wake up before she wets.  When using a bedwetting alarm, know that she will not respond independently in the beginnning.  Go to her room and remind her what to do next.  Even if all of the urine has come out, help her walk to the bathroom and try to urinate.  The first few weeks are the hardest and she will require your help.  You will begin to see smaller wets in the bed, and less frequent wetting as she makes progress.  The average child achieves dryness in 8-12 weeks. Here is a link so you can read about bedwetting alarms and reviews that other parents like you have written.

http://bedwettingstore.com/sleep-dry-solution-for-girls.html

Quoting AngelRT:

My daughter is 6 almost 7 (June 2) and she still wets the bed at least 5 nights a week! We have tried so many things and NOTHING has worked! She is a VERY heavy sleeper and even sleep walks! I am not sure what else to try! 

Things I KNOW we have tried: 

No drinks after 6pm (bedtime is 8)

No pull ups/panties only

Waking her up at least once a night 

waking her up every 2 hours

Disciplining her (THIS I did not like but was finally out of options) 

Bribing her with rewards and money! 

Cant remember what else right now but this is beginning to get hard for her. She cant even go stay at a friends house for fear of being made fun of. :( 

Thanks for any help or advice you may be able to give!


crissyd522
by on Apr. 17, 2012 at 11:10 PM

OMG!! I am having the same problem with my 9 yr old son he'll be 10 in May. He has had only 1 or 2 dry nights in his whole life. He is a very heavy sleeper, I have woken him up in the middle of the night and he'll still pee. He wears the Good Nite pull ups every night and he pees through 4-5 nights every week and he sleeps in the pee b/c he doesn't realize it. I do limit his drinks and I am at my wits end b/c noone has anything to say except he'll grow out of it. But that doesn't help when he won't go to sleep overs and he's very embarrassed of it. I also keep hearing about the sensor but I hear it's really loud and he sleeps with my younger son, so I really don't want to wake him up every night.  Also he's on ADHD meds. Any Ideas anyone b/c I am stumped!! If I took him to an Urologist will it really help? Will they do any tests to see if there's any problems or is it a waste?? Also my sister told me about meds I could give him that really help. Anyone know about any of them??

DallasCowboys81
by on Apr. 18, 2012 at 2:29 PM

My son is 11 yrs old and has issues bedwetting. He has been to several different doctors for his bladder and all have said it's fine he will grow out of it. Well he is getting tired of it along with us. We have done everything you can think of from waking him up to using the bathroom in the middle of the night to stoping liquids after 6pm. He still wets. He is ADD but the doctors claim that has nothing to do with it. PLEASE HELP!

Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 11:07 AM

I see teens whose parents have waited patiently for them to "outgrow" bedwetting.  They all wish they would have done something sooner.  As I have mentioned in other posts, the #1 cure for bedwetting is to use a bedwetting alarm.  It takes time and family committment, but getting to complete dryness in a few months is worth the effort.  Remember that he most likely will not hear the alarm sound in the beginning.  Your job will be to wake him when the alarm sounds and make sure he walks to the bathroom.  Over time, his body begins to make the connection that the sound means full bladder and walk to the bathroom.  This is much different than waking him up to use the bathroom on your schedule.  Using a moisture sensing alarm to pinpoint exactly when he needs to urinate will enable him to make that necessary brain-bladder connection.  Parents ask, "Doesn't the alarm sound too late?  He's already wet."  Having a large wet spot is how everyone starts.  You will begin to see smaller wets on the bed and urine left for the toilet as he progresses. My book "Seven Steps to NIghttime Dryness" talks about alarm use in detail.

http://bedwettingstore.com/starter-kits.html

Quoting DallasCowboys81:

My son is 11 yrs old and has issues bedwetting. He has been to several different doctors for his bladder and all have said it's fine he will grow out of it. Well he is getting tired of it along with us. We have done everything you can think of from waking him up to using the bathroom in the middle of the night to stoping liquids after 6pm. He still wets. He is ADD but the doctors claim that has nothing to do with it. PLEASE HELP!


Renee_Mercer
by on Apr. 19, 2012 at 11:17 AM

97% of children with nighttime wetting do not have any urologic problems.  An urologist could do a few urine tests to make sure your son is not in the 3% who do have problems.  Your pediatrician can also do some screening tests to rule out infection or diabetes.

The most commonly used medication for bedwetting is desmopressin, which is a synthetic hormone that makes the body produce less urine on the nights that it is taken.  It does not produce long lasting effects and most children return to wetting when they stop the medicine.  It works in about 50-60% of kids and can be taken sporatically, so is useful for sleepovers and camps where they have to be dry. The doseage varies among kids, so it is best to try it for a few nights before it is used for a sleepover.

The bedwetting "sensor" (bedwetting alarm) that you are describing is still the best way for your son to become permanently dry.  Parents often worry that siblings will be disturbed by the alarm but this is seldom the case.  Siblings quickly learn that the alarm is not for them and they ignore the sound and sleep through it.

Quoting crissyd522:

OMG!! I am having the same problem with my 9 yr old son he'll be 10 in May. He has had only 1 or 2 dry nights in his whole life. He is a very heavy sleeper, I have woken him up in the middle of the night and he'll still pee. He wears the Good Nite pull ups every night and he pees through 4-5 nights every week and he sleeps in the pee b/c he doesn't realize it. I do limit his drinks and I am at my wits end b/c noone has anything to say except he'll grow out of it. But that doesn't help when he won't go to sleep overs and he's very embarrassed of it. I also keep hearing about the sensor but I hear it's really loud and he sleeps with my younger son, so I really don't want to wake him up every night.  Also he's on ADHD meds. Any Ideas anyone b/c I am stumped!! If I took him to an Urologist will it really help? Will they do any tests to see if there's any problems or is it a waste?? Also my sister told me about meds I could give him that really help. Anyone know about any of them??


momofmany86
by on Apr. 20, 2012 at 11:48 AM
I'm not a doctor but we just had issues and saw a urologist. We have five year old twin boys and they both have bathroom issues. One goes potty every 10 minutes all day and the other frequently pees the bed. All urine tests came out normal and they did x-rays and a sonogram of his tummy. She said his x-ray showed constipation (this was the one with daytime issues). She said giving him more fiber would empty his bowels and stop irritating his bladder making him urinate less frequently. I asked her about bed wetting and she said it could be because of constipation as well. Both boys are now on a high fiber diet and have gotten a lot better. Your child's poop should look like soft serve from McDonalds. If it is balls or looks like a lot of balls clumped together, they need more fiber.
CafeMom Team
by Group Owner on Apr. 21, 2012 at 9:48 AM

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