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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Has anyone used the alarms for bedwetting? Do they work?

Posted by on May. 9, 2012 at 10:08 AM
  • 13 Replies

My DS is a deep sleeper who wets the bed often if I don't wake him up to go. I understand that waking him up doesn't necessarily work, but does an alarm? It still requires the parent to wake the child if they don't respond. Have you used an alarm? Did it work? Or is it a waste of time/money?

by on May. 9, 2012 at 10:08 AM
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Replies (1-10):
aetrom
by Gold Member on May. 9, 2012 at 11:58 AM
I have heard they do when used properly. In the beginning it will be your responsibility to wake your child up...
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twinklebites
by on May. 9, 2012 at 12:00 PM

Yes I have currently DD is using it I will then move it over to DS when she is dry for 30 days (they are both 5 5 soon to be 6) I was going to keep buying pullups for night time but DD  deseratley wated to not wear them anymore,The set up was about $80.

 

RelaxedMom2-3
by on May. 9, 2012 at 12:02 PM

Which one did you buy?

Quoting twinklebites:

Yes I have currently DD is using it I will then move it over to DS when she is dry for 30 days (they are both 5 5 soon to be 6) I was going to keep buying pullups for night time but DD  deseratley wated to not wear them anymore,The set up was about $80.



twinklebites
by on May. 9, 2012 at 12:07 PM

The pad one. they lay on top of it you cover it with a sheet or towel. It has a box that emits a annoying alarm, but it wakes DD up and I supervise her changing the sheet on such she has been dry for about 15 days so far ,previously she would wet every other night she said the alarm hurts her head it is quite annoying.

hwifeandmom
by on May. 9, 2012 at 1:46 PM

We used the Malem alarm (clips to the underwear).  It was not effective for us, but my daughter's wetting is due to her chronic constipation, so I'm not sure that the alarm can help something like that.  It was about $80.

For bedwetting to stop, a child must first develop the necessary hormone that signals the kidneys to slow urine production when the body is asleep.  Without that hormone, you produce too much urine to stay dry (and you can't awaken every couple of hours to use the toilet and still get a good night's sleep).  If a child HAS developed the necessary hormone and is just a deep sleeper, then the bedwetting alarm may be effective.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has a great book called "Waking Up Dry" which outlines the various reasons for bedwetting and what you can do about it, if anything.  Check your local library for a copy.


ParaJLegal1
by on May. 9, 2012 at 3:02 PM
Monnynac:
 
My son wet his bed nightly till he was 8 years old.  We tried everything from before-bed bathroom trips, middle of the night wake-ups for bathroom, withholding liquids after 6pm and even medications that were supposed to help control his "output."  Nothing worked and he was depressed and embarassed.  Finally, although I doubted it would work, we bought him a Malem Ultimate Bedwetting Alarm.  We figured if we were gonna spend any money on one of these gadgets, we may as well buy the "best" one on the market with all the bells and whistles on it like flashing lights, multiple alarm sounds, etc.  My son thought it was really cool and looked forward to trying it out and decided he wanted to do this all on his own.  We followed the directions to the T and to our utter shock, the darn thing worked after using it for less than 6 weeks! (although we continued to use it for 3 months as was directed).  9 months have now passed without a single accident and my son just turned 9 last week and he's happy, confident and can finally sleep over friends houses without any worry or embarassment.  I can't say this will work for everyone but thank goodness it worked for him :-)  Don't give up!
mommynac
by on May. 9, 2012 at 4:32 PM

Thanks! I'm so glad it worked. I'm definitely going to try one : )

Quoting ParaJLegal1:

Monnynac:
 
My son wet his bed nightly till he was 8 years old.  We tried everything from before-bed bathroom trips, middle of the night wake-ups for bathroom, withholding liquids after 6pm and even medications that were supposed to help control his "output."  Nothing worked and he was depressed and embarassed.  Finally, although I doubted it would work, we bought him a Malem Ultimate Bedwetting Alarm.  We figured if we were gonna spend any money on one of these gadgets, we may as well buy the "best" one on the market with all the bells and whistles on it like flashing lights, multiple alarm sounds, etc.  My son thought it was really cool and looked forward to trying it out and decided he wanted to do this all on his own.  We followed the directions to the T and to our utter shock, the darn thing worked after using it for less than 6 weeks! (although we continued to use it for 3 months as was directed).  9 months have now passed without a single accident and my son just turned 9 last week and he's happy, confident and can finally sleep over friends houses without any worry or embarassment.  I can't say this will work for everyone but thank goodness it worked for him :-)  Don't give up!


mommynac
by on May. 9, 2012 at 4:45 PM

is it the Ultimate Selectable Bedwetting alarm with vibration? They have a few..... Thanks again.

Quoting mommynac:

Thanks! I'm so glad it worked. I'm definitely going to try one : )

Quoting ParaJLegal1:

Monnynac:
 
My son wet his bed nightly till he was 8 years old.  We tried everything from before-bed bathroom trips, middle of the night wake-ups for bathroom, withholding liquids after 6pm and even medications that were supposed to help control his "output."  Nothing worked and he was depressed and embarassed.  Finally, although I doubted it would work, we bought him a Malem Ultimate Bedwetting Alarm.  We figured if we were gonna spend any money on one of these gadgets, we may as well buy the "best" one on the market with all the bells and whistles on it like flashing lights, multiple alarm sounds, etc.  My son thought it was really cool and looked forward to trying it out and decided he wanted to do this all on his own.  We followed the directions to the T and to our utter shock, the darn thing worked after using it for less than 6 weeks! (although we continued to use it for 3 months as was directed).  9 months have now passed without a single accident and my son just turned 9 last week and he's happy, confident and can finally sleep over friends houses without any worry or embarassment.  I can't say this will work for everyone but thank goodness it worked for him :-)  Don't give up!



lruggio
by on May. 9, 2012 at 4:50 PM

I used and alarm for my son who wet the bed  and we bought an alarm, used it one night and that took care of things.  He was such a deep sleeper, the alarm was velcroed on his shoulder and when the first drop of moisture hit his underwear, the alarm launched him out of bed and into the bathroom, lol.  and he never needed it again!

Traci_Momof2
by Silver Member on May. 9, 2012 at 4:53 PM


Quoting hwifeandmom:

We used the Malem alarm (clips to the underwear).  It was not effective for us, but my daughter's wetting is due to her chronic constipation, so I'm not sure that the alarm can help something like that.  It was about $80.

For bedwetting to stop, a child must first develop the necessary hormone that signals the kidneys to slow urine production when the body is asleep.  Without that hormone, you produce too much urine to stay dry (and you can't awaken every couple of hours to use the toilet and still get a good night's sleep).  If a child HAS developed the necessary hormone and is just a deep sleeper, then the bedwetting alarm may be effective.

The American Academy of Pediatrics has a great book called "Waking Up Dry" which outlines the various reasons for bedwetting and what you can do about it, if anything.  Check your local library for a copy.

 

Do you know if there is a way to tell whether a child is missing the hormone, or whether the child is just a deep sleeper?  I am thinking the case is one or the other with my DS who is 7.  He has never, ever had a dry morning.  He still wears pull-ups to bed out of practicality but it is always quite full in the morning, and some mornings he has even leaked out of the pullup (the GoodNites brand) and gotten his jammies & sheets wet.  I've been thinking about trying an alarm on him but at the same time I'm wondering if I should talk to the doctor first.  I mean, if it's a hormone issue with my son, then I assume the alarm isn't going to do a damn thing.  Do you know if the doctor can do a simple blood test or something like that to check for that particular hormone?

It's funny in a way because my other DS who is 5 is really close to being dry at night.  He still wears a pullup too but has some dry mornings, some wet mornings.  I've done a bit of waking him a couple hours after he goes to bed and again sometimes it works and others it hasn't.  I figure once school is out I'm going to hit it hard with him, waking him 2 hours after going to bed every night to use the potty.  I feel like with him after a few weeks it should do the trick.  He'll probably be night trained before his older brother is.  Older DS was the one who gave us a hell of a time day training too.  For whatever reason with him, it just doesn't come easy.

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