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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids
My fifth grader brought home letter stating that for their government and revolution unit in school they will be reading The hunger games book. They are requiring a permission slip to read this but I have not read these books and am not sure which way to go. Any advice ? Or thoughts if you've read them?
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 1:14 PM
Replies (31-40):
mommytoeandb
by Bronze Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 5:10 PM
1 mom liked this
Hmmm...scholastic has the interest level at 6th to 8th grade and the reading level in the 5 range. My 4th grader is not ready to read it and I doubt I would let her read it next year. She's pretty sensitive and that would wig her out!
Oh... Her reading level is 6 something. She does read the Warriors series, but that is about cats. :P
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LucyHarper
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 5:22 PM

It really depends on the child. My brother (I'm my siblings guardian) is in fifth grade and due to his behavior and sense of imagination, he's not allowed to read things like that. My sister was allowed at that age, so I would be fine with her. My son is four so we haven't considered it for them yet. They are pretty graphic books, kids getting killed with machetes, toddlers getting limbs blown off, the whole concept of children having to kill each other for sport, its up to you if you are comfortable with your kids reading that stuff and if they can individually handle it.

6Fish
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 5:23 PM
16 moms liked this

Absolutely not.  When you stop to consider the tremendous amount of classic literature available, and the hands on lessons that could be used to teach about government, the idea of requiring 5th graders to read this series of books is ridiculous.  Sure, some students may be able to handle the content, but I would guess that many are not.  Why is this necessary?  Maybe studying the ACTUAL government, and events that ACTUALLY occurred in history would give our children a better perspective, and a better handle on reality.  I'm floored that this is even a suggestion.  Seriously.  "Let's use a fictional book whose content may or may not be age appropriate to teach 5th graders about government!" And we wonder why the education system continues to deterioate!  This is an election year!  Get out the newspapers. Turn on the news! Talk about the REAL issues of today!!  Wow.  I'm sincerely stunned.

momto3infl
by Silver Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 5:33 PM

 I havent read them but my oldest has several times, and my middle-which when he started reading them he was in 5th.  Nothing big-to me from the movie it is like the Stephen King book Running Man.

Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 5:58 PM
There ar elots of ways to teach, why can't this be an option. A lot of things that were science fiction100 years ago are reality now. Why censor a book that really touches on a LOT of topics in society? I'm all for using many different ways to educate the next generation.

We homeschool, so it may be different but we watch the news. Watch election coverge, get current events from the newspaper. I remember in public Jr. High I had to trun in one current event each week and we could get 10 extra credit points if we did two.


Quoting 6Fish:

Absolutely not.  When you stop to consider the tremendous amount of classic literature available, and the hands on lessons that could be used to teach about government, the idea of requiring 5th graders to read this series of books is ridiculous.  Sure, some students may be able to handle the content, but I would guess that many are not.  Why is this necessary?  Maybe studying the ACTUAL government, and events that ACTUALLY occurred in history would give our children a better perspective, and a better handle on reality.  I'm floored that this is even a suggestion.  Seriously.  "Let's use a fictional book whose content may or may not be age appropriate to teach 5th graders about government!" And we wonder why the education system continues to deterioate!  This is an election year!  Get out the newspapers. Turn on the news! Talk about the REAL issues of today!!  Wow.  I'm sincerely stunned.


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AirForceWife13
by Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 6:02 PM
I remember that book and if my memory serves right I believe it was called lottery. That was a pretty distrubing book.


Quoting GwenMB:

Did any of you read that short story about the village that did a lottery every year & killed someone from their village?  Each man selected a stone & whomever got the one with the red dot, their family did a second drawing & whomever got the red dot stone was stoned to death by everyone else.

I don't remember the name of the story or who wrote it or any class discussion when we read it in 9th grade.  All I remember is being very disturbed by the story.  It still really bothers me almost 30 years later.


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huskermom98
by Silver Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 6:22 PM

I don't know, 5th grade seems too young to me, but I'm still trying to figure out when to let my 7yo read Harry Potter (so I'm really not ready to think about him being able to read the Hunger Games in a few years).  I guess it just all depends on your child and how you think they'll handle the books---but definitely read them before you decide so you know exactly what you are introducing your child to.  I've read the series several times and really enjoy it, but again, not sure sure it's 5th grade level material...

6Fish
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 6:53 PM
10 moms liked this

I have a 5th grade student who just tested in reading comprehension at the level of a 10th grade student in the 7th month.  Technically, he's more than capable of reading these books.  Emotionally, I know that these books would deeply disturb him.  In addition, as a Christian, I do not believe these books are morally appropriate for children.  I don't understand the idea of teaching young children about government with a fictional book.  Our education system, and our government are in crisis.  My 6th grade niece believes that Canada and Mexico are states within the United States!  It seems to me that our students would be much better served studying our actual system of government in a government class!  If a high school teacher wanted to use this book in a literature class, or a psychology class, that may be more appropriate. 

I understand that there are lots of ways to teach.  But, I'm sorry, I don't think using the Hunger Games to teach 5th graders about government should be one of them.  How about making sure they understand the very basics before having them analyzing a fictional book that contains violence against children?  Why not hold mock elections in the classroom?  Have them track the daily polls? Practice writing their own platforms about what they feel are important issues?  Talk about the history of women and blacks being allowed to vote?  Talk about countries which have dictatorship governments in comparision to ours?  I just can't see any legitimate reason for the Hunger Games to be included in a lesson on government for 5th graders.

We also homeschool, and this thread has served as a reminder to me as to WHY we do!

Quoting Jinx-Troublex3:

There ar elots of ways to teach, why can't this be an option. A lot of things that were science fiction100 years ago are reality now. Why censor a book that really touches on a LOT of topics in society? I'm all for using many different ways to educate the next generation.

We homeschool, so it may be different but we watch the news. Watch election coverge, get current events from the newspaper. I remember in public Jr. High I had to trun in one current event each week and we could get 10 extra credit points if we did two.


Quoting 6Fish:

Absolutely not.  When you stop to consider the tremendous amount of classic literature available, and the hands on lessons that could be used to teach about government, the idea of requiring 5th graders to read this series of books is ridiculous.  Sure, some students may be able to handle the content, but I would guess that many are not.  Why is this necessary?  Maybe studying the ACTUAL government, and events that ACTUALLY occurred in history would give our children a better perspective, and a better handle on reality.  I'm floored that this is even a suggestion.  Seriously.  "Let's use a fictional book whose content may or may not be age appropriate to teach 5th graders about government!" And we wonder why the education system continues to deterioate!  This is an election year!  Get out the newspapers. Turn on the news! Talk about the REAL issues of today!!  Wow.  I'm sincerely stunned.



maxswolfsuit
by Max on Sep. 15, 2012 at 6:56 PM

I guess I don't think of being disturbed by literature as necessarily being a bad thing. The intent of good writing is to evoke emotion. So if you were disturbed it made a big impact. It might not be pleasant. But it made you think.

The Hunger Games, to me, doesn't have the impact of "The Lottery." (I loved it though) The premise is similar, but the writing just doesn't evoke the same mood. 

Kids know about violence and people mistreating each other. Both these stories are great ways to get kids thinking about what happens when society is out of our control. But I agree, they need adult guidance to help them process it. 


Quoting GwenMB:

Would you suggest that someone who was disturbed/bothered by The Lottery read The Hunger Games?

Maybe it wouldn't have bothered me so much if there had been a good gov't/bad gov't discussion either time I read the story.  I just couldn't get past how disturbing the premise of the story to get a bigger concept out of it & I don't remember either teacher saying much of anything.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting GwenMB:

Did any of you read that short story about the village that did a lottery every year & killed someone from their village?  Each man selected a stone & whomever got the one with the red dot, their family did a second drawing & whomever got the red dot stone was stoned to death by everyone else.

I don't remember the name of the story or who wrote it or any class discussion when we read it in 9th grade.  All I remember is being very disturbed by the story.  It still really bothers me almost 30 years later.

It's call "The Lottery" I read it 7th grade. It is disturbing. But like The Hunger Games, it's the premise that's disturbing. There's no graphic description of the violence. 



GwenMB
by Gwen on Sep. 15, 2012 at 7:02 PM
3 moms liked this

FWIW, my DH is a political science professor & he agrees with you that the Hunger Games aren't a good way to teach about government.  He does have his students track current events (at a more detailed level, obviously, since they are college students not 5th graders).

Hopefully the Christian school my boys are going to will have the same moral objection you do, too.  I would kind of expect them to. But my boys are in K & preschool so not a potential concern for a while yet.

Quoting 6Fish:

I have a 5th grade student who just tested in reading comprehension at the level of a 10th grade student in the 7th month.  Technically, he's more than capable of reading these books.  Emotionally, I know that these books would deeply disturb him.  In addition, as a Christian, I do not believe these books are morally appropriate for children.  I don't understand the idea of teaching young children about government with a fictional book.  Our education system, and our government are in crisis.  My 6th grade niece believes that Canada and Mexico are states within the United States!  It seems to me that our students would be much better served studying our actual system of government in a government class!  If a high school teacher wanted to use this book in a literature class, or a psychology class, that may be more appropriate. 

I understand that there are lots of ways to teach.  But, I'm sorry, I don't think using the Hunger Games to teach 5th graders about government should be one of them.  How about making sure they understand the very basics before having them analyzing a fictional book that contains violence against children?  Why not hold mock elections in the classroom?  Have them track the daily polls? Practice writing their own platforms about what they feel are important issues?  Talk about the history of women and blacks being allowed to vote?  Talk about countries which have dictatorship governments in comparision to ours?  I just can't see any legitimate reason for the Hunger Games to be included in a lesson on government for 5th graders.

We also homeschool, and this thread has served as a reminder to me as to WHY we do!

Quoting Jinx-Troublex3:

There ar elots of ways to teach, why can't this be an option. A lot of things that were science fiction100 years ago are reality now. Why censor a book that really touches on a LOT of topics in society? I'm all for using many different ways to educate the next generation.

We homeschool, so it may be different but we watch the news. Watch election coverge, get current events from the newspaper. I remember in public Jr. High I had to trun in one current event each week and we could get 10 extra credit points if we did two.


Quoting 6Fish:

Absolutely not.  When you stop to consider the tremendous amount of classic literature available, and the hands on lessons that could be used to teach about government, the idea of requiring 5th graders to read this series of books is ridiculous.  Sure, some students may be able to handle the content, but I would guess that many are not.  Why is this necessary?  Maybe studying the ACTUAL government, and events that ACTUALLY occurred in history would give our children a better perspective, and a better handle on reality.  I'm floored that this is even a suggestion.  Seriously.  "Let's use a fictional book whose content may or may not be age appropriate to teach 5th graders about government!" And we wonder why the education system continues to deterioate!  This is an election year!  Get out the newspapers. Turn on the news! Talk about the REAL issues of today!!  Wow.  I'm sincerely stunned.




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