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What do you think is the problem with the U.S. education system/student

Posted by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 10:31 PM
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Comparatively speaking, the United States does not starve its education system of revenue. The U.S. is one of the leaders in spending on Education, and yet it's schools are rated "average" by international bodies.

The three-yearly OECD Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) report, which compares the knowledge and skills of 15-year-olds in 70 countries around the world, ranked the United States 14th out of 34 OECD countries for reading skills, 17th for science and a below-average 25th for mathematics.

Worse, out of 34 OECD countries, only 8 have a lower high school graduation rate. The United States' education outcomes most resemble Poland's, a nation that spends less than half on education than the U.S.


The U.S. spent an average of $10,615 per student in 2010.  Some districts spent over $18,000 (D.C., NY).  Obviously, we can't throw money at a problem like this. 

So what is the real issue here?

Update:  This post just blew up today.  It's going to take me a while to read all of this.

by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 10:31 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Malley
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 10:38 PM
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I'd be interested to find out how the average time spent on homework and studying in the US compares to other countries. As a teacher I get alot of pressure not to give much HW. Kids have busy lives with sports.
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wakymom
by Ruby Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 10:41 PM
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I'm guessing there is more parental involvement, no matter what the income level, in the countries that rank higher than us.

 

 

 

 

HollyBoBolly
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 10:45 PM
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I agree. I think some parents couldn't care less and use school as a babysitter. 

Quoting wakymom:

I'm guessing there is more parental involvement, no matter what the income level, in the countries that rank higher than us.

 

 

 

 


marilyn623
by Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 10:52 PM
I think the accountability just gets passed along. Its not her fault, its his and so on and so forth and noone ever has reprocussions, except the students.
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Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 11:08 PM
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Countries in Europe don't requre high school. Only those that have certain grades continue on to high school and then college so those tested are usually ahead of our general population.. It is no shame in europe to choose a vocational training program instead of college.

IMO ~ since the CA state high school exit exam is written at an 8th grade level, they should give the kids a choice of a vocational program, that includes some high school xourses, instead of forcing kids to learn things the majority will never use.

They also need to revamp the Elementary grades so that there are different classes for different TYPES of learners. Classes should be grouped by ability, not age.
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Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 11:11 PM
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DD goes to a charter school and goes to"group class" ONE DAY A WEEK. She is homeschooled the other 4 days.

It has kids from 1st ~ 5th grade. At times, the older kids help and mentor the yunger kids who are challenged to work above grade level, and other times they get to do "easy work" which is fun andsimple but reinforces the basics. Kind of like the one room schoolhouses of old.

She LOVES it and the teacher that runs it is FABULOUS.
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VeronicaTex
by on Sep. 15, 2012 at 11:11 PM
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I am inclined to believe also, that it is parent involvement and how much school has an importance in the home.

I taught in Catholic schools from 1980-1993. 

I saw a tremendous change in the Math Curriculum from when I went to school.  I attended Elementary School when Sputnik, owned by the Russians was launched into space.  In 1963 I was a fifth grader. The Race for Space had begun.  This was when the emphasis on Math and Science first made an appearance.

I distinctly remember 9th grade Algebra had to do with equations and Word Problems.

Fast forward to 1990 when I was teaching 5th grade in a Catholic school.  As far as Word Problems, the kids were expected to do the same as I was in 9th grade in about 1967.

There always has been a difference in achievement level in the Catholic Schools from the Public School.  The Catholic School's achievement level was always higher, plus discipline was a lot easier to achieve.

I have said before that I taught Bilingual Education in the Public School.  I had 3rd/4th  graders doing Word Problems in our American Schools whereas in their countries (Mexico, Central America and South America)  would be doing these at a 7th grade level at the earliest.

Since I was part of a Grade Level that taught Math and Reading for a test at the end of the year once called TAKS and now called STARS, the achievement level in Math was not very high among Americans. 

I can only speak about the At Risk Schools.

So this is my theory:  There are a lot of factors contributing to our kids not doing so well.

I would venture to say this gently:  Of kids who come from less affuent homes there is going to be more of a state of survival, which means both parents might be working.  School and support for school at home suffers.

Math Curriculum standards are being pushed lower and lower into the primary grades. 

The Math is now Problem Solving.  It is not enough to just know the four operations anymore.  One has to know how to read, evaluate, solve a problem.  If the abstract is pushed way too soon and the concrete is not strong there will be difficulties.

What I saw also is that kids naturally want the easiest way to achieve anything.

Since the path of  "No Child Left Behind" is now the path being followed, there has to be a lot of hard work being done.

Many teachers nation wide have risen to the challange.  In some cases their jobs depend on those kids passing a test at the end of the year....

It would be good to see much more parental involvement.

If there were, discipline would be much better and more would get done in the classroom.  That is how I always felt:  when I had the discipline I wanted, demanded it, but at the same time bent over backwards to show my kids I cared, I would achieve what was expected of me.

Veronica



Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 11:12 PM
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Parents need to step up and get rid of the, "well my taxes pay for their school so I shouldn't have to deal with it" philosophy and take an interest in what their kids are learning.
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marilyn623
by Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 11:16 PM
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And most public schools don't make learning fun. They should be instilling a love and passion for learning. Not forcing 7 yr olds to sit and do boring worksheets for hours :(
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LostTheSlipper
by Bronze Member on Sep. 15, 2012 at 11:33 PM


Quoting Malley:

I'd be interested to find out how the average time spent on homework and studying in the US compares to other countries. As a teacher I get alot of pressure not to give much HW. Kids have busy lives with sports.

I'd REALLY like to find a movie (educational) I saw in high school or college on the life of a girl in either China or Japan and rewatch it. It showed her getting up at like 5:30 or something so she could get to prep classes before school, then she'd go to school, she'd leave school and go to some other type of learning thing, come home and have dinner, maybe do chores (can't remember fully) and then have to do homework till like 12 or 1am before going to sleep and doing it all over again. It was kind of interesting.

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