Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

School Ban on Peanut Butter Brings Out the Crazy in Selfish Parents

Posted by Julie Ryan Evans

peanut butter sandwichWow, people are passionate about peanut butter and jelly. What started as one Arkansas boy's sandwich has now turned into an international debate with people vehemently raging both for and against the right to eat peanut butter in schools.

It started when Jenkins Clifton-Jones took a PB&J to school one day. Apparently his mom didn't know about the six-year ban his school had in place against peanut products to protect students with allergies. According to Area Wide News, when a teacher saw him about to take a bite, she confiscated the sandwich, helped the boy get a new lunch, and sent a note home explaining the school's policy.

Sounds simple enough, right? Not even close.

Instead, his mom, Denise Clifton-Jones, took to Facebook to express her anger over the policy, and eventually started the page "School Nut Ban Discussion." Since then hundreds of people have chimed in with their very adamant opinions on either side; there's even a warning to people to stop with the profanity and name calling because it's gotten so heated. Comments like this from one woman pretty well sum up the side that's irate about the confiscation:

I joined this discussion because I am so sick of hearing about nut allergies. Many children and adults have allergies that they need to learn to deal with. Don't penalize 99.9% of the school for 1 child's allergy.

I'm flat out appalled that people could be so selfish. It seems like such a non-issue. When so many children suffer from peanut allergies (some reports say it may be as high as 1 in 25) and children can DIE if exposed to them, then I don't think asking people not to bring peanut products to school is such a big deal. It's one meal a day, and no one is going to die if they don't get their favorite sandwich.

Is it somewhat inconvenient? Sure. I always have peanut butter in my cupboard, and when I haven't been to the market in awhile, I know I can always rely on it. If I couldn't, it would be a pain, but not nearly as big as the one parents of children with food allergies face every day, worrying that some speck of food might kill their kid.

It's the epitome of laziness and self-centeredness to try and fight for the right to send your child to school with a food that could seriously harm another child. No, we can't ban every food that every child is allergic to, but nuts are a big one, so why not help these families out? I bet if those parents who are so passionate about sending peanut butter had to walk in the shoes of a parent who lives in fear of the product for even one day, they'd change their minds in a Jif (pun totally intended).

Do you think schools should ban peanut products to protect children with allergies?

by on Sep. 20, 2012 at 11:16 AM
Replies (51-60):
juno1
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:04 AM
1 mom liked this

Sigh..... once again...the difference is not in the actual allergy...yes I agree the reactions can be exactly the same.  The difference is that the allergen is invisible.....you cannot see peanut ( or  sunflower) oil. It can lurk anywhere and everywhere.  So reactions come out of the blue. That... is the difference.   Imagine if pineapples were gooey and oily and one of the most commonly eaten lunches at school. Imagine your daughter having reactions, willy nilly - after opening the bathroom door, borrowing a pencil or simply by touching a desk....  with not a pineapple in site....  That is much harder to control than simply avoiding a piece of fruit...or having to read ingredient lists...   therein lies the difference they cannot control their environment.  

And for the record, I have not advocated for peanut free schools....  I am advocating awareness...

Quoting dee1603:

It's really not that different though. A food allergy is a food allergy. My daughter was 13m old when we discovered she was allergic to pineapple. We gave her a small piece at dinner time and within seconds her lips started to swell up, we took it away and gave her benedryl immediately. No matter how you look at it, it's unfair to say that one allergy is worse than another and to ban one food allergen from schools but not another. It has to be one or all.


Quoting juno1:

Read my explanation as to why it is different......

Quoting dee1603:

You know, you hear all the time about this "peanut allergies" and banning foods as whatnot. But never, NEVER, do you hear about citrus allergies!! My family is highly allergic to oranges, tomatoes, pineapple. These items are never banned and this allergy is rarely acknowledged. Guess what. We learned to live with it. And didn't request that people stop eating these items to accommodate. Just saying.




dee1603
by Member on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:16 AM
I agree, I see your point. Everyone needs the awareness.

You know one I hate, when you go out to eat and ask for something to not be put on your food (ie tomatoes) and they just take the one off instead of making a whole new one. Like the residual from the item isn't there. Smh


Quoting juno1:

Sigh..... once again...the difference is not in the actual allergy...yes I agree the reactions can be exactly the same.  The difference is that the allergen is invisible.....you cannot see peanut ( or  sunflower) oil. It can lurk anywhere and everywhere.  So reactions come out of the blue. That... is the difference.   Imagine if pineapples were gooey and oily and one of the most commonly eaten lunches at school. Imagine your daughter having reactions, willy nilly - after opening the bathroom door, borrowing a pencil or simply by touching a desk....  with not a pineapple in site....  That is much harder to control than simply avoiding a piece of fruit...or having to read ingredient lists...   therein lies the difference they cannot control their environment.  

And for the record, I have not advocated for peanut free schools....  I am advocating awareness...

Quoting dee1603:

It's really not that different though. A food allergy is a food allergy. My daughter was 13m old when we discovered she was allergic to pineapple. We gave her a small piece at dinner time and within seconds her lips started to swell up, we took it away and gave her benedryl immediately. No matter how you look at it, it's unfair to say that one allergy is worse than another and to ban one food allergen from schools but not another. It has to be one or all.





Quoting juno1:

Read my explanation as to why it is different......

Quoting dee1603:

You know, you hear all the time about this "peanut allergies" and banning foods as whatnot. But never, NEVER, do you hear about citrus allergies!! My family is highly allergic to oranges, tomatoes, pineapple. These items are never banned and this allergy is rarely acknowledged. Guess what. We learned to live with it. And didn't request that people stop eating these items to accommodate. Just saying.






Posted on CafeMom Mobile
mjande4
by Platinum Member on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:24 AM
2 moms liked this

My stance is that there is NO such thing as a "peanut free" school and advertising yourself as one is setting someone who has an allergy up for disaster.  I don't believe that "banning" a food will save anyone.  In fact, it probably will have a larger chance of contact being made, because NO ONE can control what others do in THEIR homes.  Teach the kids with allergies how to manage THEIR ISSUES and then you reduce the likelihood of something occuring.

dcdmattison03
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:27 AM

 My son is allergic to nuts, his school doesn't have a ban but they do have on file which kids are allergic and how severe it is. Like this little boy last year wasn't even aloud to smell it or he would have a reaction so his class could not bring it at all. (they eat in their classrooms). My son just gets real bad hives as well as the other girl in his class so his class this year can still bring it in.

CafeMom Tickers




CafeMom Tickers






 

juno1
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:28 AM

Oh boy....yes, I agree, that drives me crazy.   See, that is where so many people are just unaware...they think we are just being picky.  It's an uphill battle... :)

Quoting dee1603:

I agree, I see your point. Everyone needs the awareness.

You know one I hate, when you go out to eat and ask for something to not be put on your food (ie tomatoes) and they just take the one off instead of making a whole new one. Like the residual from the item isn't there. Smh


Quoting juno1:

Sigh..... once again...the difference is not in the actual allergy...yes I agree the reactions can be exactly the same.  The difference is that the allergen is invisible.....you cannot see peanut ( or  sunflower) oil. It can lurk anywhere and everywhere.  So reactions come out of the blue. That... is the difference.   Imagine if pineapples were gooey and oily and one of the most commonly eaten lunches at school. Imagine your daughter having reactions, willy nilly - after opening the bathroom door, borrowing a pencil or simply by touching a desk....  with not a pineapple in site....  That is much harder to control than simply avoiding a piece of fruit...or having to read ingredient lists...   therein lies the difference they cannot control their environment.  

And for the record, I have not advocated for peanut free schools....  I am advocating awareness...

Quoting dee1603:

It's really not that different though. A food allergy is a food allergy. My daughter was 13m old when we discovered she was allergic to pineapple. We gave her a small piece at dinner time and within seconds her lips started to swell up, we took it away and gave her benedryl immediately. No matter how you look at it, it's unfair to say that one allergy is worse than another and to ban one food allergen from schools but not another. It has to be one or all.





Quoting juno1:

Read my explanation as to why it is different......

Quoting dee1603:

You know, you hear all the time about this "peanut allergies" and banning foods as whatnot. But never, NEVER, do you hear about citrus allergies!! My family is highly allergic to oranges, tomatoes, pineapple. These items are never banned and this allergy is rarely acknowledged. Guess what. We learned to live with it. And didn't request that people stop eating these items to accommodate. Just saying.







Savedfromsin79
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:50 AM

I think If a school banned peanut things for allergies it would start a slippery slope. 

What about kids allergic to lactose? Kids allergic to glutin? Kids allergic to chocolate? Kids allergic to flour? Kids allergic to x,y,z?

I mean there are a million allergies out there.. You can't protect everyone from everything..

EACH CHILD MUST KNOW I AM ALLERGIC TO X. I MUST STAY AWAY FROM X.

My son is allergic to DOGS! He is responsible to stay away from them! If he starts having a reaction.. I give him his medicine and then we talk about how he came in contact with the dog..or fur. There has been a few occasions where someone had several dogs at home and the dander and fur was on a coat etc That wasn't his problem.. But that is why he has Singulair and why he has an epipen if he needs it. I also carry benadryl at all times and same with his inhaler. When his allergies flare up he has breathing problems and needs the inhaler. 

But even with my son having that issue.. I DON'T EXPECT EVERYONE I KNOW TO GET RID OF THEIR DOG! I mean hello.. it don't work that way in real life.. Why teach them in school that it does!

             

bebcarroll
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 10:52 AM
1 mom liked this

I have a nut allergy, but I am an adult and I can do things to prevent a reaction.  I am also old enough to understand when I am having a reaction and I can stop the reaction.  A kid is not going to necessarily know those things.  I have to avoid other peoples baked goods, eating at ice cream parlors and Wendy's and a few other things.  But I still have reactions.  Like when a bread company here did not put on the loaves that all the bread is mixed in the same machine.  Kids are even more vulnerable and they can't all read. 

But, I don't think an out and out school with or district wide ban is the answer.  Because they do need to learn to avoid their allergens. They cannot assume the world is peanut free.   I think peanut free tables or rooms (my daughter's school does not have a cafeteria, so all the classrooms in which a child has an allergy are then free of that allergen.) Her school of 280 kids has two classrooms (of 20 kids each) that currently have bans.  One of those classrooms is for a boy with multiple severe allergies, his class mates can opt out of the classroom ( and be in the other 2nd grade).  This, makes more sense to me than banning peanuts at  a school that does not have a student with an allergy.

MumaSue
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 11:27 AM

Totally agree with you.


Quoting bebcarroll:

I have a nut allergy, but I am an adult and I can do things to prevent a reaction.  I am also old enough to understand when I am having a reaction and I can stop the reaction.  A kid is not going to necessarily know those things.  I have to avoid other peoples baked goods, eating at ice cream parlors and Wendy's and a few other things.  But I still have reactions.  Like when a bread company here did not put on the loaves that all the bread is mixed in the same machine.  Kids are even more vulnerable and they can't all read. 

But, I don't think an out and out school with or district wide ban is the answer.  Because they do need to learn to avoid their allergens. They cannot assume the world is peanut free.   I think peanut free tables or rooms (my daughter's school does not have a cafeteria, so all the classrooms in which a child has an allergy are then free of that allergen.) Her school of 280 kids has two classrooms (of 20 kids each) that currently have bans.  One of those classrooms is for a boy with multiple severe allergies, his class mates can opt out of the classroom ( and be in the other 2nd grade).  This, makes more sense to me than banning peanuts at  a school that does not have a student with an allergy.


ashleysmommy123
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 12:17 PM

I totally understand why it is banned and I have come to accept the policy.  Do I like it....no, not really.....but do I understand why it is necessary, yes.  I feel for those parents who have to watch what their kids eat everyday and even though there may be simple methods at school that could be taken to prevent a child with an allergy from coming in contact with nuts.....kids also like to share their food, and may not understand that by doing so could make someone else very sick.  I am however happy that I send my child to a private Catholic school that does not have this policy.  My daughter isn't a huge PB & J fan, but she does enjoy many of the snacks that may be on the not allowed list for their contamination by nuts. 

Melanie420
by on Sep. 21, 2012 at 12:23 PM
I'm staying out of this because everytime I comment on this subject I get attacked
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)