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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Math Homework

Posted by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 5:46 PM
  • 23 Replies
How does your child learn addition? DS's (1st grade) teacher uses rhymes, which I even have a hard time remembering. It seems like another method would be better for the kids to learn how to do addition problems. What method do you use for your LO to learn addition?
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by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 5:46 PM
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kaylasmom22
by Bronze Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 5:50 PM
I don't have a method but she is doing common core so is more hands on learning.
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steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 5:50 PM
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My boys learned addition and subtraction at around 3 years old, yes they are advanced in math.  I taught them with visual aids like peas, poker chips, cookies, m&ms, etc.  I'd put 3 items near their right hand and 2 items near their left hand and would ask them if they put them together, how many would they have?  They answer 5, so I would say 3+2=5.  

This way worked very well for them because they were actually seeing it and hearing it and they understood the concept really well.  Math is more than just memorizing facts.  Flashcards also work well for some kids too.

3babiesofmyown
by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 5:52 PM
We haven't got there yet. Mine's doing great with numbers but struggling with letters.

As a kid I gave my numbers personalities and they all had relationships. Weird I know. It's just what I did. Like 7 had a crush on 5's daughter 12. Then at times 6&7 fought over 13. 4 is a very nice and easy going guy. Kinda young. But helps out 5 with 9 etc. and 4 loves to hang out with 8 b/c they talk about 12. That's just a few. I have no clue where I got all that. I grew out of it and actually learned math but never forgot my early number soap opera days. Lol
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VeronicaTex
by on Oct. 9, 2012 at 6:02 PM

Former teacher here:  I taught 3rd/4th grade Math, where they were just moving from concrete to abstract.

Thinking about your child:  There must be somewhere in the curriculum where they talk about sets and either touch real objects or see them represented on paper.  This is the concrete.

Once a child has after many times worked with this concept, they are ready to move on to the abstract, that is using just numbers.

Therefore what I would do is make sure your child is well acquainted as to what sets look like, and then add. 

You could find sites on the internet to practice, but your kitchen would probably have just what you need.

Example: 

        3

+    4

________

I did this vertically on purpose.  When your son goes on to more complicated addition, this is better.  However, in simple addition it still might be done horizontally.

On one piece of paper you could put 3 of something-like three apples.

You could cut out a huge plus sign.

On another sheet below the sheet with apples you could put 4 apples.

You son can count the first set and write the number 3.  Then have him count the second set and write the number 4. 

Have him put both sets of apples together and count.  He should get 7, and then on a practice sheet, write out the problem and solve it. In his answer he can put 7 apples in all or 7 apples.  This will be preparing him for the word problems to come.

This way he is putting concrete images in his head that will be there when he goes to retrieve that information the next time he sees a problem with just numbers.

Best wishes to your son and you,

Veronica



mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 6:02 PM
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Mine learned around 3 using manipulatives and then flash cards. I'm old school and firmly believe in drill. My kids are all in honor's math courses so I feel pretty confident in my methods.
frndlyfn
by Gold Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 6:03 PM

right now tallying LOL.  At home we use fingers up to the number 10 and even larger numbers we can use fingers with.  She is in first grade as well.

othermom
by Silver Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 6:03 PM

We do diffent things. Counting things, work books, ect

AidanTiarra
by Bronze Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 6:03 PM
My kids use number bonds. We also do flash cards, online games and we will play hands on games. For example we will play a game with dice that they have to add together to get their number of spaces to use, etc
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othermom
by Silver Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 6:04 PM


Quoting frndlyfn:

right now tallying LOL.  At home we use fingers up to the number 10 and even larger numbers we can use fingers with.  She is in first grade as well.


using dots and stuff to count  helps too

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 9, 2012 at 6:04 PM
Quoting 3babiesofmyown:

We haven't got there yet. Mine's doing great with numbers but struggling with letters.

As a kid I gave my numbers personalities and they all had relationships. Weird I know. It's just what I did. Like 7 had a crush on 5's daughter 12. Then at times 6&7 fought over 13. 4 is a very nice and easy going guy. Kinda young. But helps out 5 with 9 etc. and 4 loves to hang out with 8 b/c they talk about 12. That's just a few. I have no clue where I got all that. I grew out of it and actually learned math but never forgot my early number soap opera days. Lol


Your method is not that dissimilar to fact families, which is another common way to teach the basics.
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