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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

What should the repercussion be when parents...

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don't support their child's education?

If a parent won't contact the school, attend conferences, monitor homework, get their child to school regularly, or return phone calls should there be a consequence for that?

Is this something CPS should get involved in or maybe the court system. Should involvement in education be tied to PA benefits? Or is it a parent's right to neglect their child's education?

Debate...

by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 6:15 PM
Replies (11-20):
Lydlou02
by Bronze Member on Nov. 17, 2012 at 6:46 PM
She did not monitor homework at all. She taught us to forge her name for back-to school paper work. The only time I ever saw her go to the school was for Bro#2's iep. I went to school regularly because I got on the bus, and it never occurred to me to do any different.
I've been morally opposed to homework since ,2nd grade. If it didn't get done @school I didn't do it. Thay was back in the day when kids could get away with that as long as they aced every test.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Did your mom do anything to support your education?

Did you go to school regularly, do homework? Did she call teachers back when they called or respond to notes? If any of you struggled did she do anything to help you?

I already said in a previous reply I'm not talking about parents who can't attend conferences because of work schedules. 

Quoting Lydlou02:

Hell no. my divorced mom raised 7 kids all by herself. She sure as hell couldn't afford to take two whole days off working her job @ bk, or missing class @ the community collage to attend all our conferences. We were well cared for and didn't need cps harassing our already harried mom.

And connecting that to benefits like FS and section 8 would've done nothing but make us go to bed hungry, if we still had beds to go to.
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mhaney03
by Member on Nov. 17, 2012 at 6:50 PM

Wow that's a lot of days!  I kept my daughter out of school last year for 3 days because she had REALLY long hair and came home the 2nd day of school with lice.  It took forever to get that cleared out and I got threatened with jail time.  I had the doctor's note but I was just going to send her with it when I sent her back to school.

Now I do just the opposite.  I bring the note right after I get it (I don't even go home, leave the doc and go straight to the school) and then I call every day to give the secretary an update and I also pick up any missed worksheets.  Now they think I'm annoying :)

 

side note:  since the lice thing, I spray their hair every morning with a spray-in conditioner or detangler (whatever is on sale) and we haven't had lice since.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting mhaney03:

Where would you draw the line? I'm supposed to initial by the date every day in their agendas and most of the time, I forget to.  But they do all their homework and I attend every open house and have requested meetings with teachers.  but can I get in trouble for not initialing their agendas?  Sounds like a slippery slope here.  I like the rules the way they are.  If  a a child reports abuse to school, they have to investige.  If a child reaches so many missed days, they have to investigate.

I see what you're saying and I agree that is a slippery slope. 

Sadly, investigating after missing so many days is consistent everywhere. My district has an obscene attendance policy. A child has to miss 20 days each semester before anything is done. And then it's just a letter. Another 10 days before they get sent to court. Even then, the judge just scolds them. So kids can miss 50+ days a year with no consequence. 

I have a student right now that I am trying to get an IEP for. But I need a documented parent conference for the RTI process to progress. I've called over and over, sent notes with the child, mailed notes, and sent the social worker. Mom answered the phone one time and scheduled a conference but didn't show up for it. 

She's been in school for 7 years and none of teachers have ever met her parents or spoken to them on the phone. I've never gotten more than a signature from her as far as communication. I know she's literate because I taught her other child years ago and she was involved then. 


mjande4
by Platinum Member on Nov. 17, 2012 at 7:30 PM
1 mom liked this

Since test scores now are part of teacher evaluations I do think that parents should be held accountable in some way.  The students that don't perform well in school typically are the ones with little to no parent involvement.  I don't know what the answer is, but typing in to public assistance might be the one trigger that motivates an otherwise absentee parent.  Very interesting topic Max!

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Nov. 17, 2012 at 7:33 PM


Quoting mjande4:

Since test scores now are part of teacher evaluations I do think that parents should be held accountable in some way.  The students that don't perform well in school typically are the ones with little to know parent involvement.  I don't know what the answer is, but typing in to public assistance might be the one trigger that motivates an otherwise absentee parent.  Very interesting topic Max!

A few years ago (maybe 8-10) they started requiring parents to bring copies of conference forms to get food stamps. We had parents coming out the wood work demanding conferences. I remember one who asked for two conferences in one day. When I explained I couldn't do that she wanted to come the next day. She wasn't happy when I told her it would be a least a month before I could have another official conference, but I was happy to chat informally whenever she'd like. LOL

I think that it would help if they knew someone was checking. 

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Nov. 17, 2012 at 7:37 PM

The idea of not being involved is foreign to me as a parent, but as a teacher all to real.  At my level there are an astronomical number of students who live on their own or with siblings/cousins in a roommate type situation.  It's just so sad.  School is the last priority on their list.  Of course, poverty breeds poverty.  Fortunately, a handful overcome their situations and don't continue the cycle.  That's what makes the job rewarding.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting mjande4:

Since test scores now are part of teacher evaluations I do think that parents should be held accountable in some way.  The students that don't perform well in school typically are the ones with little to know parent involvement.  I don't know what the answer is, but typing in to public assistance might be the one trigger that motivates an otherwise absentee parent.  Very interesting topic Max!

A few years ago (maybe 8-10) they started requiring parents to bring copies of conference forms to get food stamps. We had parents coming out the wood work demanding conferences. I remember one who asked for two conferences in one day. When I explained I couldn't do that she wanted to come the next day. She wasn't happy when I told her it would be a least a month before I could have another official conference, but I was happy to chat informally whenever she'd like. LOL

I think that it would help if they knew someone was checking. 


banana-bear
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 7:52 PM
1 mom liked this
There is no debate, IMO. A parent has every right to be uninvolved in their child's education. There really are too many things that may factor into why they aren't involved. In the end, it's their child's future, not yours. Saying that there should be repercussions and that we should be alerting CPS is going overboard and wasting our resources.
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banana-bear
by on Nov. 17, 2012 at 7:55 PM
I love how you assume that either people on public assistance are uninvolved parents, or that uninvolved parents are on public assistance.

Quoting mjande4:

Since test scores now are part of teacher evaluations I do think that parents should be held accountable in some way.  The students that don't perform well in school typically are the ones with little to know parent involvement.  I don't know what the answer is, but typing in to public assistance might be the one trigger that motivates an otherwise absentee parent.  Very interesting topic Max!

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maxswolfsuit
by Max on Nov. 17, 2012 at 8:00 PM
1 mom liked this

She's not assuming anything. She's basing her statement off of years of teaching and tons of research linking poverty to low achievement in school. She never said all uninvolved parents are on PA or that all parents who get assistance are uninvolved. 

Quoting banana-bear:

I love how you assume that either people on public assistance are uninvolved parents, or that uninvolved parents are on public assistance.

Quoting mjande4:

Since test scores now are part of teacher evaluations I do think that parents should be held accountable in some way.  The students that don't perform well in school typically are the ones with little to know parent involvement.  I don't know what the answer is, but typing in to public assistance might be the one trigger that motivates an otherwise absentee parent.  Very interesting topic Max!


maxswolfsuit
by Max on Nov. 17, 2012 at 8:03 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting banana-bear:

There is no debate, IMO. A parent has every right to be uninvolved in their child's education. There really are too many things that may factor into why they aren't involved. In the end, it's their child's future, not yours. Saying that there should be repercussions and that we should be alerting CPS is going overboard and wasting our resources.

What about the child's right to learn the basic skills needed to be successful in adult life? Parents don't always advocate for their children. Shouldn't someone do it?

If I stop taking an interest in my students' futures I would be a pretty piss poor teacher. Sorry, but that's just not going to happen. 

Also, I didn't say anyone should alert CPS. In an earlier response I said it wouldn't work. I threw out a variety of scenarios to generate discussion. 

snowangel1979
by Bronze Member on Nov. 17, 2012 at 8:05 PM
It kinda a slippery slop and where's the line.
Unfortunately you can't make people care.
You can't tell a single mom who works and is struggling, to take a day off to go to a conference.


I'm VERY involved in my children education, mainly because I homeschool. LOL. Before I was homeschooling DS I was still involved. I went to every conference, tried to talk to the teacher regularly.

Unfortunately the same could not be said for the teachers, I would have to call multiple times or they would say everything was great only to talk to her a week later and her tell me everything DS did wrong all month.
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