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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

teachers complaints about parents

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my intention for this question is because I absolutely love my dd teacher and want to make sure im not doing anything unknowingly irritating to her kwim but here is the question:

Other than the obvious stuff like parents who think their kid can do no wrong (this would not be me cause I know who my kid is lol) and the parents that are completely uninvolved in their childs education, what are things that parents do that are irritating to teachers?

by on Jan. 11, 2013 at 12:30 PM
Replies (41-50):
Morrigan333
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 11:26 AM

Yeah, really! Mine is adhd too (and Processing Disorder).  I hate when the teacher gives the same home work ditto that he gave the week before.My dd's reading teacher has donethis alleast 4 times already (that I can recall< and I KEEP all the papers that come home-so I know).

Quoting MsLogansMommy:

my intention for this question is because I absolutely love my dd teacher and want to make sure im not doing anything unknowingly irritating to her kwim but here is the question:

Other than the obvious stuff like parents who think their kid can do no wrong (this would not be me cause I know who my kid is lol) and the parents that are completely uninvolved in their childs education, what are things that parents do that are irritating to teachers?


Tara922c
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:18 PM
1 mom liked this

Please don't ask your teacher to do something unreasonable, such ask, asking the teacher to call you every Thursday to remind you that your dd/ds is staying after school for tutoring. Tutoring is every single Thursday; mark it on your calendar.

 

DrDoofenshmirtz
by Silver Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 12:29 PM
1 mom liked this

Not to the OP, but a PP:  Ideally, it would be great to give 2 positives for each negative,but here is the issue, when I do that as a teacher, the parent does not get the severity of the issue.  Especially if it is a meeting about how to help the child.  So, while a teacher should give constructive criticism, with a child who is having big issues, or not making it in a course or grade, a realistic picture needs to be painted. 

janitablue
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 1:47 PM
2 moms liked this

MsLogansMommy this is a great post and honestly I learn lot. Next Christmas I will not give my son teacher a mug. wink


MsLogansMommy
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 3:35 PM

This is one of the many reasons why I love this teacher so much because she makes me feel like my child is the most important student in the room (which I bet she gives those same feelings to other parents about their kids) and I am constantly trying to find ways for my child to be less of a distraction because I can totally appreciate the fact that their is at least 20 other kids in the class. My child needs alot of attention and I am working with many different resources to help her so I understand this complaint completely because when my dd teacher does what I feel is above and beyond the scope of her responsiblity to my child I feel so guilty I feel like if I was the parent of the other children I would be upset that one kid is taking so much time but whenever I tell her that she always has the "its no big deal" attitude when I know it is a big deal and I am beyond grateful for the effort she makes for my kid.

Quoting mjande4:

My biggest complaint is a parent thinking/acting like their child is the most important student in the room.  Along with this, them thinking/insisting that the child is smarter/advanced then they really are. 


keljo05
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 3:40 PM
2 moms liked this
There's a difference from the teacher treating you and your child this way....and those parents that think everything revolves around their child.

Sounds like you have a great team with your daughters teacher :)


Quoting MsLogansMommy:

This is one of the many reasons why I love this teacher so much because she makes me feel like my child is the most important student in the room (which I bet she gives those same feelings to other parents about their kids) and I am constantly trying to find ways for my child to be less of a distraction because I can totally appreciate the fact that their is at least 20 other kids in the class. My child needs alot of attention and I am working with many different resources to help her so I understand this complaint completely because when my dd teacher does what I feel is above and beyond the scope of her responsiblity to my child I feel so guilty I feel like if I was the parent of the other children I would be upset that one kid is taking so much time but whenever I tell her that she always has the "its no big deal" attitude when I know it is a big deal and I am beyond grateful for the effort she makes for my kid.


Quoting mjande4:


My biggest complaint is a parent thinking/acting like their child is the most important student in the room.  Along with this, them thinking/insisting that the child is smarter/advanced then they really are. 



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MsLogansMommy
by on Jan. 12, 2013 at 3:52 PM

I understand that and I agree. I have not volunteered yet this year in class due to my schedule but I plan to because I want to see how my dd acts (I know she may act diff with me there) and I also want to see how the class is run so I can see if there are anythings that i notice right off that may make it easier for my dd to focus that is her big problem she doesnt focus and doesnt listen when teacher giving instructions and I have talked to dd about this and her answer about why she does this is (the old faithful) "I dont know"

I wouldnt expect special treatment for my child and I actually feel guilty when she gets it. I just requested an IEP and I have looked into private tutoring its a nightmare helping her with her homework she just gives up so easy

one question i just thought of I kind of understand why dd isnt getting the instructions when the teacher is giving them to the class because at home i have to give dd one to two instuctions at at time (adhd) then when she finishes I give her the next set of instructions my question is i understand and agree that is not the teachers problem that is something we need to work on but i dont know how and i certainly dont expect the teacher to sit with my kid everyday and go over what she just explained to the class (which is what she is kind of doing now) its not fair to teacher or other students ugh this is so frustrating

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I thought of another issue with involved parents for the OP. 

Don't expect your involvement or helping the teacher to earn your child special treatment. 

Some parents seem to think if they supply the class with things or help out the the teacher their child should somehow be treated specially or get privileges other kids don't. We have a huge issue at our school with the children of volunteers being unsupervised after school while their mothers are doing things on campus. And it's not unheard of for parents to think their help should result in better grades for their kids. That's just not how it works. 


mom2jessnky
by Silver Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 4:00 PM


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I thought of another issue with involved parents for the OP. 

Don't expect your involvement or helping the teacher to earn your child special treatment. 

Some parents seem to think if they supply the class with things or help out the the teacher their child should somehow be treated specially or get privileges other kids don't. We have a huge issue at our school with the children of volunteers being unsupervised after school while their mothers are doing things on campus. And it's not unheard of for parents to think their help should result in better grades for their kids. That's just not how it works. 

Why would the child get better grades because the parent volunteered or bought some Lysol wipes? I'm just really trying to figure out the logic there. Some parents are weird I guess.

I demand a unicorn, I bought a case of Lysol Wipes for the school! ;)


Idntreallycare
by Bronze Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 4:03 PM
2 moms liked this
I remember being told that a parent called in and said "this is how my son will be doing things, whether you like it or not"
I think one teacher told her if that was her outlook, go ahead and homeschool
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Idntreallycare
by Bronze Member on Jan. 12, 2013 at 4:17 PM
There are definitely parents like that. They won't come out and say "I brought in tissues, my kid should be getting better grades" but they'll kind of mention the stuff they brought in. If I personally sent in tissues, it's because I don't want my child having to wipe his nose on the sandpaper tissues that the school provides

Quoting mom2jessnky:


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I thought of another issue with involved parents for the OP. 

Don't expect your involvement or helping the teacher to earn your child special treatment. 

Some parents seem to think if they supply the class with things or help out the the teacher their child should somehow be treated specially or get privileges other kids don't. We have a huge issue at our school with the children of volunteers being unsupervised after school while their mothers are doing things on campus. And it's not unheard of for parents to think their help should result in better grades for their kids. That's just not how it works. 

Why would the child get better grades because the parent volunteered or bought some Lysol wipes? I'm just really trying to figure out the logic there. Some parents are weird I guess.

I demand a unicorn, I bought a case of Lysol Wipes for the school! ;)


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