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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

If you had to write an opinion exam on Social (academic) Promotion

Posted by on Jan. 13, 2013 at 1:27 AM
  • 8 Replies

For grades K-8, what would be your reasons for and against it?


I wrote my entrance test for education, and my reasons were basically that in regards to being for social promotion, it increases a child's self-esteem, and here in Manitoba, not really sure about other provinces and states though - it's against most school policies to fail or hold back a child anywhere in grades k-3. The reason is children's social development is happening full force here, and they are at a vulnerable age where they may feel they are being punished if they are held back, and that is crucial to their development.

My reason for against social promotion is that it holds back a child's full potential to learn the material. 

And I offered a third view on children with disabilities and delays. They need social promotion because they cannot help that they have something that prevents them from learning the material at the same rate as other children.

I also proposed that if social promotion is to be used on a child that does not have a disability or delay, that it should only be done once and under certain circumstances that the parents work with their child and the school to make sure their children are getting proper academic support to learn the material.


What are your thoughts on it? Do your schools use this policy?


by on Jan. 13, 2013 at 1:27 AM
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Replies (1-8):
wakymom
by Ruby Member on Jan. 13, 2013 at 1:28 PM

 I would think that holding a child back when younger would be easier on them b/c kids are more accepting. I know a lot of kids who were held back in kindergarten and are doing just fine now. However, a boy in my 5th gr class (granted this was numerous yrs ago) was held back and had a very hard time w/ it; ended up getting in trouble a lot. Older kids are more aware of what being held back usually means and can be a lot crueler.

 

 

 

 

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Jan. 13, 2013 at 1:38 PM
2 moms liked this

In general I am apposed to retention. I have seen very few cases where it has a long term positive impact on the child's learning. I'm not saying never, I know it does help some students. But most of the time the issue that caused the child to fall behind his or her peers is still there after the retention. They make make up lost ground and maintain for a year or two. But most of the time they are behind again a few years later. My lowest students are generally the ones who have been retained. 

I think teachers need to be trained better and get more support so they are able to differentiate instruction to meet individual needs. A child can still learn 3rd skills in fourth grade if the class is structured appropriately.  Remedial instruction needs to happen in the next grade. A redo of the year before isn't the best approach. 

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Jan. 13, 2013 at 1:40 PM

Our school has no policy on social promotion. If the student doesn't meet the criteria to pass they are held back. 

They can only be retained twice, so after they they are placed in the next grade. Students with disabilities are generally only retained once. 


Mocking.Jay
by Silver Member on Jan. 13, 2013 at 4:11 PM

I guess it depends on the child, and the way it's presented to the child. If a teacher makes it "fun" and says "Well, you like me, and I like you, so you get to spend another year with me! We're going to have so much fun!", then I can see how it'd be easier on a child, but for the most part, from friends of mine who've been held back in elementary, they took it hard because to them, they felt like they were being punished. I find it hard to believe children think it's fun to be held back, whereas when they're older, they have a more matured mind to understand WHY they are being held back. 

My issue with holding a child back a grade so young is that children are at their most impressionable at this age. If they feel the teacher is punishing them, they're going to dislike school as they get older.

Quoting wakymom:

 I would think that holding a child back when younger would be easier on them b/c kids are more accepting. I know a lot of kids who were held back in kindergarten and are doing just fine now. However, a boy in my 5th gr class (granted this was numerous yrs ago) was held back and had a very hard time w/ it; ended up getting in trouble a lot. Older kids are more aware of what being held back usually means and can be a lot crueler.

 

 

 

 


Mocking.Jay
by Silver Member on Jan. 13, 2013 at 4:13 PM

In my high school, if you failed one class, you failed the whole grade. A lot of students failed, but got socially promoted regardless because the teachers didn't want to spend another year with them lmao.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Our school has no policy on social promotion. If the student doesn't meet the criteria to pass they are held back. 

They can only be retained twice, so after they they are placed in the next grade. Students with disabilities are generally only retained once. 



Mocking.Jay
by Silver Member on Jan. 13, 2013 at 4:15 PM

I agree. My mom talked about only repeating the section that the child did not do well on. So, instead of failing grade 2 or 3, a child would then be promoted to grade 3 or 4 and then the school would apply for inclusion support with someone who has their ETA certificate or something, you know what I mean? That way, the child is pushed harder to learn the material.

I think schools here in Canada should focus on that.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

In general I am apposed to retention. I have seen very few cases where it has a long term positive impact on the child's learning. I'm not saying never, I know it does help some students. But most of the time the issue that caused the child to fall behind his or her peers is still there after the retention. They make make up lost ground and maintain for a year or two. But most of the time they are behind again a few years later. My lowest students are generally the ones who have been retained. 

I think teachers need to be trained better and get more support so they are able to differentiate instruction to meet individual needs. A child can still learn 3rd skills in fourth grade if the class is structured appropriately.  Remedial instruction needs to happen in the next grade. A redo of the year before isn't the best approach. 


janitablue
by on Jan. 13, 2013 at 8:15 PM

I know someone who child goes to my son 's school was held back because she was failing the requirement that were need to pass to the next grade. I approve of this policy. I personally see nothing wrong with this I was held back in fourth grade because I did not pass the requirement. 


queencreekmom
by on Jan. 13, 2013 at 8:42 PM

As a teacher I am for social promotion. Statistically, kids who are held back often never catch up.

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