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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids
So. My son comes home and says. My teacher put me and 1 other white boy and 2 african american boys in front of our class and says. "If these 4 went in for a job. Would the white boys or the black boys get it"? Now the teacher is African American as well. Now what gets me is. Why does color even matter? If the African American boy has the better qualifacations. Then in my opinion he should get the job over my son. Its very clear to me. But I don't get how she thinks its ok to make it about race. I know that would have never crossed my sons mind til she put it there. Just wanted to get opinions and see if anyone else sees this as wrong. And if it were ur kids how would u handle it?
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by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 11:44 AM
Replies (41-50):
calsmom62
by on Feb. 7, 2013 at 10:44 PM
She's probably trying to make a point about subtle racism, it is Black history month. Sounds like she didn't think it through very well
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Basherte
by Bronze Member on Feb. 8, 2013 at 6:46 AM

I would call the school and talk to the teacher. Ask her why she chose to do that. Ask what the kids were supposed to get out of it. Then I would complain to the principal.



wedding countdown

rHOPEb
by Member on Feb. 8, 2013 at 8:32 AM

That's just wrong!

justliloleme
by on Feb. 8, 2013 at 8:38 AM
Thanks ladies. For all the feed back. Just wanted to see how u ladies would handle it. And get some reassurance before taking it to her and/or the principal.
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Hottubgodess
by on Feb. 8, 2013 at 9:55 AM

A white teacher, who is a huge advocate in the racial negotiations committees in our area and not a bigot by any means, got in trouble for using the word "sordid" on a vocab test (it was a state mandated vocab word).  If race is going to be an issue one way, it has to be the other as well.  

I understand history and social studies, but come on, she is out of line.  We are supposted to teach our kids to be accepting.  We can't when we point out differences.

Quoting justliloleme:

They are elementary. 2nd grade. A bunch of 7 and 8 yr olds.


Hottubgodess
by on Feb. 8, 2013 at 9:56 AM

I would start with her.  Face to face.  If there is no understanding, then include the principal.  

Quoting justliloleme:

Thanks ladies. For all the feed back. Just wanted to see how u ladies would handle it. And get some reassurance before taking it to her and/or the principal.


STVUstudent
by Bronze Member on Feb. 8, 2013 at 10:10 AM

Could it have been an example of how to properly dress/present for a job interview?  I dunno... If it were my kids, I would probably ask more questions.  How were the students dressed/groomed?  What was the purpose of the exercise/example?

I had a teacher once, years ago, who would have us fill out job applications as a classroom exercise.  Any mistake, even one, and he would mark it fail and we would have to do it again.  He did this a coupel of times a month.  Years later, I found out his reasoning... if all the potential employer is looking at is the job application, you want yours to be the best looking, best prepared job application in his pile.  Especially now, with jobs as hard to come by as they are, you want to give your kids whatever leg up you can.  A kid might think that his outfit is snazzy and cool, but try thinking like an employer... is this look going to get me hired or passed over at a glance?  Kids need to understand early on that the way a person looks and presents themself is the FIRST impression... if you go in looking like a thug, a gang banger, a pothead, or a player, you will probably not get a second look.  If you are clean, well groomed, wearing clean and neat clothing that really fits, you automatically have a leg up...

Barabell
by Barbara on Feb. 8, 2013 at 11:35 AM

Please update us when you do talk to her. I'm interested to hear how this goes.

Quoting justliloleme:

Thanks ladies. For all the feed back. Just wanted to see how u ladies would handle it. And get some reassurance before taking it to her and/or the principal.


Barabell
by Barbara on Feb. 8, 2013 at 11:37 AM

We are all different, and so what's wrong with pointing that out? Personally, I think acceptance is easier with you have a better understanding of differences and backgrounds. 

Sordid is not a bad word. I have no idea why any teacher would be in trouble for having that on a vocabulary test. What ever district punished that teacher was in the wrong. Just because that district was wrong, it doesn't mean all teachers should be treated that way.

Quoting Hottubgodess:

A white teacher, who is a huge advocate in the racial negotiations committees in our area and not a bigot by any means, got in trouble for using the word "sordid" on a vocab test (it was a state mandated vocab word).  If race is going to be an issue one way, it has to be the other as well.  

I understand history and social studies, but come on, she is out of line.  We are supposted to teach our kids to be accepting.  We can't when we point out differences.

Quoting justliloleme:

They are elementary. 2nd grade. A bunch of 7 and 8 yr olds.



aetrom
by Gold Member on Feb. 8, 2013 at 11:42 AM
He was making it up. Had me going for awhile though. ;)


Quoting M4LG5:


Quoting aetrom:

Considering My son Told me once that his favorite part of gym was Being tied above the basket and kids threw balls at him i think i would ask the teacher what the lesson was before i got riled up.

I agree!!


BTW....what "activity" means he is tied up above the basket and kids throw balls at him?


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