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Teachers are Quitting

Posted by on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:24 PM
Max
  • 79 Replies
2 moms liked this

Too many teachers are quitting, experts warn

 


 
Too many teachers are quitting, experts warn
 

Frustrations for teachers include low social status, relatively low salary levels, the lack of merit pay and a sense of failure, says Jon G. Bradley, associate professor of education at McGill University.

Photograph by: Marie-France Coallier , The Gazette

False allegations of misconduct are one element in a toxic brew of problems driving an extraordinary number of teachers out of the education field, say educational experts.

“Across North America, nearly half of all new teachers leave the field within five years,” said Jon G. Bradley, associate professor of education at McGill University. In Alberta, one of the few provinces to collect data, the figure is 40 per cent within five years. Figures for Quebec were not available, but believed to be similar to the North American average.

The education field is in crisis, said Bradley. “It’s almost as though we’re doing everything in our power to discourage these fully trained, committed people from making teaching a career,” he said. But if the growing incidence of false allegations is the “elephant in the room” that no one wants to talk about, it’s not the only problem. Other frustrations for teachers include low social status, relatively low salary levels, the lack of merit pay and a sense of failure, he said.

“Any other profession that had that kind of turnover would look at working conditions, would look at salaries and other things surrounding the teaching environment,” said Joel Westheimer, university research chair and professor at the University of Ottawa’s faculty of education. “Instead, in education, we bring up talk about testing teachers and linking their pay to the students’ performance. I mean, can you imagine Microsoft suffering a crisis because there were not enough programmers going into the profession and leaving after the first five years? Would (the company’s) response be to increase salaries, recruit better people, change working conditions so that they could work in different places, have free soda and free lunches? Or would it test them?”

Bradley said teachers have been left defenceless in the face of unfair pressures and accusations. “We’re all worried about bullying in schools, but what about parents bullying teachers? What about principals bullying teachers? It’s not a collaborative workplace. We live these lies (in schools), that everybody loves children and therefore we all have to be nice people.” But schools are not nice places, said Bradley. “Learning is hard work,” he said. Students are pushed and challenged and they don’t always want to be.

Parents, teachers and school administrators ideally should all be working together with a clear understanding that “when we turn our children over to a school, we do so on the understanding that they’re doing the best job they can with the resources they have,” said Bradley. Instead, teachers, especially male teachers, are left alone to confront sometimes fantastic allegations.

It is now standard practice to warn teachers to never touch students. British music teachers were told in 2010 by their union not even to reposition pupils’ hands on an instrument. When the British education secretary complained that this directive played to a “culture of fear among adults and children,” the union refused to change it, saying careers had been ruined by false allegations.

The tragedy, said Westheimer, is that at the same time as the first false allegations came out, in the 1980s, so did research showing that children learn better when they feel cared for by their teachers. A U.S. study from 1986 found that in classes where a teacher touched students when congratulating them on results or behaviour, students’ disruptive behaviour dropped by 60 per cent.

Bradley, who has been in education for nearly 45 years, worries that with no “exit interviews” for departing teachers, no one is gathering information on why the field is hemorrhaging its newest recruits.

“It’s not just one thing you can fix,” he said. “It’s a whole series. It’s an attitudinal view of the place of school and the role of teachers in our society. And I don’t think we’re prepared to engage that. That’s what scares me.”

http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/many+teachers+quitting+experts+warn/7907873/story.html



Read more:http://www.montrealgazette.com/business/many+teachers+quitting+experts+warn/7907873/story.html#ixzz2KXZLjW4I

by on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:24 PM
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Replies (1-10):
Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:29 PM
6 moms liked this
They need to revamp the entire system... that's the failure..not the teachers.

Refusing to proviide assistance until a child is TWO YEARS behind grade level is insane. (One of the many thngs I was told when trying to get services for myDS) Why wait for them o fail and THEN TRY to play catch~up??

Requiring all teachers to teach the same thing doesn't. Allow the flexabiity forstudents with differing needs...
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mjande4
by Platinum Member on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:31 PM
1 mom liked this

So true and an excellent article!! I watch the young teachers and they just are overwhelmed and discouraged. They leave for other careers. The older teachers are taking early retirement too. My school is STILL two math positions short AND we have 2 that are simultaneously student teaching while teaching. No prior experience in a classroom at all. Both have said they are switching careers and won't be back.  :-(

mama2beautiesnb
by Member on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:33 PM
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my mom is a middle school teacher, my aunt is a jr high teacher, my uncle is a high school teacher/coach, my late grandpa was a middle school teacher, and my grandma was an elementary school teacher. and thats just one side of my family.... this isnt news to me. used to be teachers would teach past retirement age due to the love of it all. now they cant wait til retirement bc its become nothing more than babysitting. no one cares anymore. that includes the students and parents.
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mjande4
by Platinum Member on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:36 PM
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I honestly don't believe that parents don't care, BUT in today's society everyone is looking for a "quick fix" or an easy solution that doesn't require hard work and ethics. That is what I see missing.

Quoting mama2beautiesnb:

my mom is a middle school teacher, my aunt is a jr high teacher, my uncle is a high school teacher/coach, my late grandpa was a middle school teacher, and my grandma was an elementary school teacher. and thats just one side of my family.... this isnt news to me. used to be teachers would teach past retirement age due to the love of it all. now they cant wait til retirement bc its become nothing more than babysitting. no one cares anymore. that includes the students and parents.



maxswolfsuit
by Max on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:36 PM

Amazing how in this economy where thousands of college educated professionals are out of work that teaching positions can't be filled. 

Quoting mjande4:

So true and an excellent article!! I watch the young teachers and they just are overwhelmed and discouraged. They leave for other careers. The older teachers are taking early retirement too. My school is STILL two math positions short AND we have 2 that are simultaneously student teaching while teaching. No prior experience in a classroom at all. Both have said they are switching careers and won't be back.  :-(


mjande4
by Platinum Member on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:40 PM
1 mom liked this

But don't you know "anyone" can teach! (Rolls eyes)

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Amazing how in this economy where thousands of college educated professionals are out of work that teaching positions can't be filled. 

Quoting mjande4:

So true and an excellent article!! I watch the young teachers and they just are overwhelmed and discouraged. They leave for other careers. The older teachers are taking early retirement too. My school is STILL two math positions short AND we have 2 that are simultaneously student teaching while teaching. No prior experience in a classroom at all. Both have said they are switching careers and won't be back.  :-(




SarahSuzyQ
by Sarah on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:42 PM
In my state there are more certified teachers than open teaching positions. This must be regional... And I know other areas have the same issue. Most of it is due to deep budget cuts that don't allow for hiring of new teachers. :-\

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Amazing how in this economy where thousands of college educated professionals are out of work that teaching positions can't be filled. 

Quoting mjande4:

So true and an excellent article!! I watch the young teachers and they just are overwhelmed and discouraged. They leave for other careers. The older teachers are taking early retirement too. My school is STILL two math positions short AND we have 2 that are simultaneously student teaching while teaching. No prior experience in a classroom at all. Both have said they are switching careers and won't be back.  :-(




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Tea4Tas
by on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:45 PM

My Mom taught from 1954-1995 and then worked as a substitute from 1996-2012.   That is what-57 YEARS?

Funny thing its the first 41 were all K-4th and she discovered she liked subbing at the middle school level best.

steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Feb. 10, 2013 at 6:54 PM

I sometimes find the lack of teachers in other parts of the country quite shocking.  Around here we have more qualified teachers than available positions.  I have a cousin with a teaching degree who has been out of college for nearly 4 years now.  She works at Barnes & Noble because she hasn't yet been offered a teaching position and this isn't from the lack of trying.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Feb. 10, 2013 at 7:00 PM
1 mom liked this


Quoting steelcrazy:

I sometimes find the lack of teachers in other parts of the country quite shocking.  Around here we have more qualified teachers than available positions.  I have a cousin with a teaching degree who has been out of college for nearly 4 years now.  She works at Barnes & Noble because she hasn't yet been offered a teaching position and this isn't from the lack of trying.

If you look at the states with a surplus of teachers and teachers' salaries you see a big correlation. The higher paying states obviously have far more qualified candidates. 

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