Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

 

Poll

Question: Do you know where you child ranks nationally on standardized testing? (Average)

Options:

97%-99%

90%-96%

85%-89%

80%-84%

70%-79%

55%-69%

40%-54%

39% or less


Only group members can vote in this poll.

Total Votes: 26

View Results

So in a couple of other threads ranking, labeling, test scores, and grades have come up.    THis is a hot-button topic for many and it seems that alot of us are on very different pages when it comes to these ratings, why we have them, and what they mean.  So I am curious.  Where does everyone stand?  


Jen
~ I speak from the heart because the truth is always the best - even if you don't know it yet. ~
by on Feb. 14, 2013 at 11:51 PM
Replies (41-50):
matofour
by Silver Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 10:28 AM
1 mom liked this
Yes I know:) but, it's never to early to think ahead when it comes to her Iep.
She's in fourth grade, but we are already working on accommodations to be out in place for middle school.
Like, teachers making copies of all their notes for her (forget writing, she can't spell!). And, being able to type her writing assimgments, they are actually working some programs that are voice activated for her. She's an amazing writer...but, spelling gets her. She tends to dumb all her writing down, using words she can spell rather than write to her ability.
She also gets all her work copied on a certain shade of paper. The contrast helps her so much. She also is allowed to read using a pen light, to highlight words. Makes her read faster, and better.
Like I said, she had an amazing over the top teacher! I wish I could put her in my pocket and keep her!!! But, she's been amazing in helping stick things in the Iep that we know will be a tremendous help as she ages and the work gets hard. Right now she's able to compensated because she's got an amazing memory, and she's super smart. But, we know eventually that will even out and the work (reading it) will just get too hard for her.
Plus, she's learning the orton/Gillianham program, actually it's in her Iep, her teachers must be trained in the program!!! Amazing right, all her teachers must be trained in this program, and it's three day training. They asked a teacher in every grade to take the training. There is a handful of students who flourish with this program, she's one of them. And, that's in her Iep (teacher must be trained in the program!!).
Sorry, got off track...but yes, I know this year it may not help her. But, the larger print is something we are just realizing how much it helps her to read better with.



Quoting maxswolfsuit:

They should be able to get large print tests. But they might not be able to with this late notice. We have to request special accommodations earlier in the year to make sure there's time to prepare them. Also, if you are requesting her state test be large print the school will need to provide all her tests in large print. Accommodations given for testing must be given all the time. 

Even if it's too late for this year you could get it set up for the future. 

Quoting matofour:

She gets all that. We have a really good Iep for her. And amazing teachers to help her out.

But...she had to read the test part herself. Kills her every time.

I actually am putting a call in Monday to ask about if they have large print tests. Silly, I know. But, it really helps her.

I dread NJ ASK week for her, she spends all day in testing! She comes home just spent, and crabby!!







Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting matofour:

I do. But only because the school tells us.





I don't care where they stand, as it has no bearings on my child.


One is above, one is below.





My one that's below, is dyslexic. If someone read the test to her she would score way above. But, she reads extremely slowly, and missing words sometimes. So, it affects her greatly in an instance like a standardized test.


Her IEP doesn't allow for extra time?

And she could have someone read the test to her in some states. In some she would have to reading portion her self. But someone could read math and any other subjects to her.  





Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Barabell
by Barbara on Feb. 16, 2013 at 10:38 AM

The results I get from our state (IF I actually receive them) say what my son got in reading and math (or science if he tested on it that year), and then it has a graph showing his percentile on the state level. It shows his personal history on state tests. There is NO national score in our results. 

If I want to see how his school performed, I have to look it up online. Or you can call the district and request it.

My son has science some years and not others. He's only been tested once on science so far, and I never received his results for that year. Last year, he did not have the science portion, but I got to see how he did on the previous two years in math and reading. 

Our state is one of the ones that has opted out of No Child Left Behind, and I've heard they're constantly tweaking the test. It used to have some written portions on reading, but now the majority of the test for the majority of the years are now all multiple choice because it's much cheaper to score and compile results. They might try to keep our mailing low in paper to reduce mailing costs too.

Quoting ScarletRose4488:

I don't think there is any "official" national test but there are a number of tests that are taken at schools throughout the country.   As for the state test, from what I have come to understand there are formulated methods of comparing them.  It seems to be big business to compare tests and compile rankings.

Many of the tests done in our school district have a report which states what my chid got, what the average child in her grade (or age) at her school got, what the average child in her grade (or age) in her district got, and so on with state and national scores.   They usually have percentages as well as exact numbers. 

There are educators and mathmaticians much smarter than I who compare the tests.  If I attempted to compare results it would be apples to oranges.  Or more likely apples to pizza as I am sure I would miss the mark.   LOL.  


Quoting Barabell:

I didn't think there was NATIONAL testing. I thought every state was different. I have seen where my son ranks in terms of STATE testing, but I have never received any paperwork about national testing.

I do know that when you compare quality of education in the different states, our state ranks among the highest.

There is such a disparity in education from state to state that me saying what my son's state percentile is wouldn't be comparable to the majority of people in this group. Comparing percentiles on state tests from different states is like comparing apples to oranges to bananas.




GwenMB
by Gwen on Feb. 16, 2013 at 10:41 AM

My kids aren't old enough yet, either.  But I will also be interested in where they fall compared to other students their age.  I'm glad I'm not the only one!  And that a teacher is interested in the same thing.

I thought one of the big complaints with the testing is that teachers do teach to the test?  Are you (your school) an exception, or do you think most teachers do it like you do?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

My kids aren't old enough for this yet. But I will interested to see how they compare to other kids their age. 

Standardized testing is the only way to compare curriculums and teaching methods from place to place. I use my students' test scores to plan curriculum and make teaching decisions. I look at other schools in the district with higher student achievement and see what they are doing differently so I can improve what my team is doing with our own students. (No we don't teach to the test. The only complaint I've gotten in the last couple of years is that I don't do enough test prep.)Without standardized tests there is no way to compare the learning of groups of students in different places. I know it's not a popular opinion, but standardized tests are necessary. 

I don't think they are valuable in assessing an individual student's learning. There are too many factors that can come into play that could skew the scores. But when looking at a group, the scores reflect the learning that's taken place. 


Barabell
by Barbara on Feb. 16, 2013 at 10:44 AM

Yes, that is true for most areas. But the standardized testing my son takes is issued by the state. So it is easier to compare the overall eductional standards of schools county to country within the same state because those counties are all taking the exact same standardized test. 

Different states have different standarized tests, and so it's harder to compare the quality of education from state to state.

Quoting Basherte:

The education varies highly depending on where you live from county to county. Not just state to state.

Quoting Barabell:

I didn't think there was NATIONAL testing. I thought every state was different. I have seen where my son ranks in terms of STATE testing, but I have never received any paperwork about national testing.

I do know that when you compare quality of education in the different states, our state ranks among the highest.

There is such a disparity in education from state to state that me saying what my son's state percentile is wouldn't be comparable to the majority of people in this group. Comparing percentiles on state tests from different states is like comparing apples to oranges to bananas.



maxswolfsuit
by Max on Feb. 16, 2013 at 10:54 AM

I know my team does the least test prep at our school and generally has the best scores in the school. 

Many teachers are misguided and assume that practice tests and test practice help scores. I've always believed that focusing on instruction and mastery of the skills will result in good scores. In ten years of having students tested I've never had weak scores. 

What I see is that lots of schools or teachers start prepping for the test a couple of weeks before. I don't think the whole year is geared towards teaching to the test though. 

Quoting GwenMB:

My kids aren't old enough yet, either.  But I will also be interested in where they fall compared to other students their age.  I'm glad I'm not the only one!  And that a teacher is interested in the same thing.

I thought one of the big complaints with the testing is that teachers do teach to the test?  Are you (your school) an exception, or do you think most teachers do it like you do?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

My kids aren't old enough for this yet. But I will interested to see how they compare to other kids their age. 

Standardized testing is the only way to compare curriculums and teaching methods from place to place. I use my students' test scores to plan curriculum and make teaching decisions. I look at other schools in the district with higher student achievement and see what they are doing differently so I can improve what my team is doing with our own students. (No we don't teach to the test. The only complaint I've gotten in the last couple of years is that I don't do enough test prep.)Without standardized tests there is no way to compare the learning of groups of students in different places. I know it's not a popular opinion, but standardized tests are necessary. 

I don't think they are valuable in assessing an individual student's learning. There are too many factors that can come into play that could skew the scores. But when looking at a group, the scores reflect the learning that's taken place. 



steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 11:04 AM

Our school does it similarly to Max.  State testing is in March for us, and my boys just brough home practice tests last week.  They'll most likely do 1 or 2 more practice test over the next month.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I know my team does the least test prep at our school and generally has the best scores in the school. 

Many teachers are misguided and assume that practice tests and test practice help scores. I've always believed that focusing on instruction and mastery of the skills will result in good scores. In ten years of having students tested I've never had weak scores. 

What I see is that lots of schools or teachers start prepping for the test a couple of weeks before. I don't think the whole year is geared towards teaching to the test though. 

Quoting GwenMB:

My kids aren't old enough yet, either.  But I will also be interested in where they fall compared to other students their age.  I'm glad I'm not the only one!  And that a teacher is interested in the same thing.

I thought one of the big complaints with the testing is that teachers do teach to the test?  Are you (your school) an exception, or do you think most teachers do it like you do?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

My kids aren't old enough for this yet. But I will interested to see how they compare to other kids their age. 

Standardized testing is the only way to compare curriculums and teaching methods from place to place. I use my students' test scores to plan curriculum and make teaching decisions. I look at other schools in the district with higher student achievement and see what they are doing differently so I can improve what my team is doing with our own students. (No we don't teach to the test. The only complaint I've gotten in the last couple of years is that I don't do enough test prep.)Without standardized tests there is no way to compare the learning of groups of students in different places. I know it's not a popular opinion, but standardized tests are necessary. 

I don't think they are valuable in assessing an individual student's learning. There are too many factors that can come into play that could skew the scores. But when looking at a group, the scores reflect the learning that's taken place. 




cocoroo
by on Feb. 16, 2013 at 11:08 AM
I know because a letter gets sent home. I hate standardized testing. I find it pointless and time consuming. That said my oldest three all test 90% and above in everything. My youngest is more average.
Posted on the NEW CafeMom Mobile
Basherte
by Bronze Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 11:11 AM

Ah. Okay. I read what you said wrong. My apologies.

I will have to check into that stuff this year. My son will start k next year.

Quoting Barabell:

Yes, that is true for most areas. But the standardized testing my son takes is issued by the state. So it is easier to compare the overall eductional standards of schools county to country within the same state because those counties are all taking the exact same standardized test. 

Different states have different standarized tests, and so it's harder to compare the quality of education from state to state.

Quoting Basherte:

The education varies highly depending on where you live from county to county. Not just state to state.

Quoting Barabell:

I didn't think there was NATIONAL testing. I thought every state was different. I have seen where my son ranks in terms of STATE testing, but I have never received any paperwork about national testing.

I do know that when you compare quality of education in the different states, our state ranks among the highest.

There is such a disparity in education from state to state that me saying what my son's state percentile is wouldn't be comparable to the majority of people in this group. Comparing percentiles on state tests from different states is like comparing apples to oranges to bananas.





wedding countdown

Verrine
by Bronze Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 12:58 PM

Half the poll answers are saying 97-99%. Something is fishy about that.

jamianne
by Silver Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 1:00 PM

Other - my kids don't take state tests until 3rd grade and my oldest is only in 1st.  :)

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

close Join now to connect to
other members!
Connect with Facebook or Sign Up Using Email

Already Joined? LOG IN