Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

IEP/504 accommodations

Posted by on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:23 PM
  • 57 Replies

I'm kind of on the fence about this. I know my dd needs help she is struggling and they are currently evaluating her for special ed services and I was looking over the different accommodations and modifications that I can ask for and I have a 2-part question

1) what accommodations should someone receive that has ADHD combined type, possibly dyslexic (they havent tested yet so I dont know but I have an extremely strong feeling that she is), Sensory Processing

2) Do accommodations help or hamper the student

I want her to be held to the same standards as her peers but I understand why accommodations are offered to level the playing field so to speak but thats not how the real world works so this is why im struggling with this decision.

I think I will ask that she take tests in a separate room due to distractions but i dont want her to have less work to do. Im also not sure if I should request more time or no time on tests type accommodations.

 

by on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:23 PM
Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Replies (1-10):
a_brown23
by Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:30 PM

Your dd sounds like my own. How old is your dd? Mine is kindergarten and I have been debating whether to persue this type of thing. Sorry I do not have an answer, but here is a BUMP! Good luck!

frndlyfn
by Gold Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:31 PM

DD has certain delays which she has an IEP for.  Her teacher does hold her to the same standards as rest of class but will send more work home from class if she does not complete it.   She is extremely smart but will fight the handwriting / journal portions of class.  At home we are working on her independent skills so that the teacher does not have to maintain dd's focus on the work.

Which grade is your dd in?

MamiJaAyla
by Bronze Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:33 PM

You don't have to ask for mor time its all up to you.  With my son I REFUSE to have him do less work but I did request extra time for H.w. and assignments (esp. since at the time he would often fall asleep on the way home or at the table).

The school requested extra time for tests.  I disagreed but said fine my biggies were separate location, redirection to continue work, and breaks (they said he would NEED the extra time... he didn't for the SAT we'll see for the FCAT).

He actually has 1:1 testing but that's him not every child needs that. the accomodations are meant to help.  Research them and find a few that you feel will help your child.  Ask their teacher what they would suggest etc.

It may be breaking work up into chunks rather than all at once... especially long assignements.  There is not specific shoulds you know your child.  Highlight the ones you think that may be good and discuss them with the teacher, a specialist etc.

supermomz25
by on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:37 PM

my son is HFA and he has modifications for each of his classes, (he's in junior high). he is given extra time to take tests, he can make up tests after school, he is given an extra week if needed to finish projects and he takes home less homework.

the modifications are definitely helping him. his grades aren't perfect, but they are vastly improved since last year.

steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:38 PM

I'm not really sure why you wouldn't want accomodations, they are there to help her and to even the playing field so to speak.  My son has the accomodation for additional time written into his IEP for the past 6 years, but he has yet to need it.  Just because it is there, it doesn't mean that she will have to use it.  

coolmommy2x
by Gold Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:40 PM
1 mom liked this
I can only speak from my own experience. DD has an IEP for her speech delay which causes her to sruggle with her work. It's been nothing but a positive experience. The teacher suspects an issue and right away I have a call from the teacher and resources available.

It's good that you're thinking of questions but also wait to see what the tests reveal and what suggestions they have. They may have your answers in their plan.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SarahSuzyQ
by Sarah on Feb. 16, 2013 at 8:59 PM

How old is your DD? When did she start on her IEP?

My son is entering K in the fall, and we're on the fence about pursuing an IEP/testing for him with speech. He's been with early intervention and now receiving private services, and his preschool teacher had requested some evaluations... Which came back just fine. It's hard because he does struggle with expressive speech unless it's in a clinical setting. So I'm not really sure what we're going to do, and I have been trying to learn from other moms who have kids in similar positions.

Quoting coolmommy2x:

I can only speak from my own experience. DD has an IEP for her speech delay which causes her to sruggle with her work. It's been nothing but a positive experience. The teacher suspects an issue and right away I have a call from the teacher and resources available.

It's good that you're thinking of questions but also wait to see what the tests reveal and what suggestions they have. They may have your answers in their plan.



MsLogansMommy
by Bronze Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 9:11 PM

 

dd is 6 years old and in 1st grade. The only reason I have even pursued this is because she is at risk of retention and homework time is a nightmare one of us ends up in tears. Her short term memory is horrible. She will know the answer to something and then within seconds she will not know the answer. The way she spells/writes is so bizarre she will write the word "it" for example and she writes the "t" first and then goes back and puts the "i" in front of it so techniqually it is spelled write when you look at it but its just weird oh and her name is Logan so she will write L.o.g (and then space) n ....then she goes back ad puts the a in between the g and the n she does this every single time she writes her name

Quoting a_brown23:

Your dd sounds like my own. How old is your dd? Mine is kindergarten and I have been debating whether to persue this type of thing. Sorry I do not have an answer, but here is a BUMP! Good luck!


 

MsLogansMommy
by Bronze Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 9:16 PM

 

I probably worded my question wrong what I meant to ask is what accommodations are available and then I will review those and think about which ones can help her I do know that 1 on 1 testing is probably one I will ask for. She gets major anxiety when timed and actually ends up giving up without even trying so I think I may ask for untimed test just for now ( she is only in 1st grade) and then once she has a little more confidence in herself and her abilities then I may want to ease her into a more formal type of testing. I just want to know what types of things are actually doable and what things are like way out there the school will never approve this type of stuff.

also is this even beneficial is there any studies that show children with special needs that receive accommodations go on to be productive adults

Quoting MamiJaAyla:

You don't have to ask for mor time its all up to you.  With my son I REFUSE to have him do less work but I did request extra time for H.w. and assignments (esp. since at the time he would often fall asleep on the way home or at the table).

The school requested extra time for tests.  I disagreed but said fine my biggies were separate location, redirection to continue work, and breaks (they said he would NEED the extra time... he didn't for the SAT we'll see for the FCAT).

He actually has 1:1 testing but that's him not every child needs that. the accomodations are meant to help.  Research them and find a few that you feel will help your child.  Ask their teacher what they would suggest etc.

It may be breaking work up into chunks rather than all at once... especially long assignements.  There is not specific shoulds you know your child.  Highlight the ones you think that may be good and discuss them with the teacher, a specialist etc.


 

MamiJaAyla
by Bronze Member on Feb. 16, 2013 at 9:22 PM

honey where the proof that timed tests have a benefit to anyone???

My bro had accomodations and he graduated from a top university.  You don't have to allow them nor should you allow... I'm disabled to be an excuse but at the same time... why torture them??? Should we not have ramps b/c its an accomodation???

Same idea.  And trust me even with the extra time thing... she will have tests and/or quizes that are timed in class or some of the state /district intrims, the Rti interventions which tend to be on-line, the AR tests etc.etc.etc.

If you ahve a great teacher they will be willing to see the diff. b/w time and untimed b/c the what do you want to see what the child can REALLY do or what they can do while freaking out and/or distracted???

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)