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Another IEP question **update**

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What reasons would there be for not wanting parents to have a copy of the evaluations to review before the IEP meeting?

 

**I just received an email stating the reports will be ready for me to pick up by the end of the day today and that they will keep the Friday meeting scheduled.

by on Feb. 27, 2013 at 6:23 PM
Replies (41-50):
maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 2, 2013 at 7:27 AM
1 mom liked this

So do you think they're lying when they say they're finalizing the reports? 

That was a possible explanation offered earlier and I'm sure it's true. It's often a mad dash to get everything done before the meeting because of the massive amount of testing and paper work that needs to be done.  Once the testing is done the psychologist needs to put everything into a narrative so everyone can understand it. It takes hours to do that well. 

This isn't typical request so I'm sure you've caught the school off guard. Rescheduling meetings is complicated because it many people need to change their schedules and some of those people probably work at several different schools and are coordinating schedules with many other people.  Meetings are booked weeks in advance.  The only way to reschedule would be to push the meeting back weeks.  So the fact that the school doesn't want to automatically reschedule in case you need time is understandable. 

I really hope you're not assuming the school is trying to pull one over on you. Your request is very unusual. I'm sure they don't have procedure in place for getting reports out early and moving meeting is more complicated than it sounds. 


Quoting MsLogansMommy:


They are very careful not to flat out refuse to give me the reports ahead of time since they have no legal right to do so however they are not cooperating either. They are telling me that they will go over the reports at the meeting and that they are finalizing the reports and if we need to schedule another meeting to allow me more time to review them then we can do so at the IEP meeting. I responded that I would like to reschedule the date now then since I am quite sure that I will need time to review the information in order for me to be an equal part of the IEP team. Basically my whole issue is that I don't want to be sitting in a meeting with 5 other people and be learning this info for the first time and possibly be shocked or saddened or whatever it is I dont want to experience those emotions in a room with strangers I want to be at home with family learning about the areas that my daughter struggles and I am sure I will have questions but I think is would make the actual meeting more efficient because I will have prepared my questions beforehand and if they answer my questions in the explanation that is fine but if I am feeling emotional I many not be as effective as I can be with preparation. and then there is that other small issue that it is my legal right to have the reports before the meeting.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting MsLogansMommy:

I understand that at the IEP meeting they will be going over the evaluations and explaining things but I do not see what harm it is for the parents to get a copy of the reports ahead of time since it is the parents legal right to do so.

What explanation did the school give you? Did they refuse to give them to you, or did they say they don't normally do it? There's a big difference. 




Tryshx
by on Mar. 2, 2013 at 7:39 AM

I don't expect anything from the school until the actual IEP meeting (except actual test results) because before you agree to the conditions of the IEP it's just basically the school brainstorming what would work and what wouldn't... as long as you get an actual copy of the IEP I wouldn't worry about it.

DyslexiaParent
by on Mar. 2, 2013 at 8:19 AM
2 moms liked this

There are various ways different schools/districts handle this.  Some draw up a list of goals they'd like to consider adding and they send a copy of those to the parents in a PWN 5-10 days before the IEP meeting.. Basically saying, "These are possible goals I'd like us to discuss at the meeting" or some districts use those IEP generating packages where they have someone in the meeting who is selecting or typing in a goal as it is discussed and decided in the IEP meeting.  I realize there is a lot of work that is required in managing the IEPs of all of the kids, so it is natural (and truthfully expected) that a teacher would have thought about and jotted down possible goals ahead of time.  IMHO, the violations of IDEA come in when the district pretty much presents the parent with the IEP as the district thinks it should be and then 'discusses it with the parent'.. even if the parent is allowed to make suggestions for changes. 

The premade IEP is what has been the issue in the cases I've known because what ends up in the IEP is pretty much what the writer of the IEP unilaterally decided should be in there.   Seldom, once an IEP is drawn up by any one individual, is there any meaningful or substantiative change made to the IEP in the meeting because discussion is minimized and it's more like going through a checklist. 

Trust me, I realize there is a lot of hard work for the school and there are MANY parents who don't really care to be all that involved in the IEP process until their child doesn't make any meaningful progress year after year... In those cases it is really, really easy for the school to assume the role of creator of the IEP while dismissing a parent as disinterested.  The problem I then see is that the district, when using such practices, even applies them towards parents who are highly interested in being involved in the planning and education of the child.  Then there begins to be more contention, the school gets at odds with the parent--often labeling the parent as "difficult" or a "problem parent", when in fact--the parent is a highly responsible parent who has a vested interest in the child's education.  I think if a school gets into a standard way of operating that is, shall we say 'efficient' for themselves in dealing with a number of disinterested parents, they can end up causing major problems and issues with the parents that want to be involved every step of the way.

Because of IDEA & the parental right to be an equal member of the IEP team, I think it is prudent to always meet parental rights as if the parent is an "interested party" and even really seeking to work well with the more interested parents for the sake of the child.  A parent who IS interested in being involved can be one of the greatest partners for the school because that parent is usually more willing to put in extra effort with their child in the evening, etc.   If, for example, a school gets into the practice of sending those goal ideas to every parent before the IEP meeting, they are going to meet the needs of the parent who wants to be involved.

It's a tricky act to balance, for sure, but in cases like the OP.. Where she wants the results of the evaluation before being expected to make decisions upon the IEP, it is good that her school is willing to have a secondary meeting.    I see lots of schools who outright refuse to provide results ahead of time and don't want to have another meeting because it is "too difficult to schedule everyone." --That it is, but in not helping the parent have meaningful participation, the district is failing to treat the parent as a professional member of the IEP team.. And the parent IS a professional because she / he  has more intimate knowledge of the child than anyone else in the room.  Thus, when I see schools who have a parent that WANTS to be involved, I just really have a difficult time understanding why the school doesn't embrace parental involvement.  More often the schools complain about the lack of involvement of the parents, but not EVERY parent is uninvolved.

I hope that makes sense.  I know from my original post it may seem like I don't understand the school's side... I DO understand.  It's just that parents need to know they have a right to be equal members and the schools often don't realize the ways in which they dismiss parents as if the parents don't matter, which really IS an issue when it comes to parents who want to be involved with their children educationally. 

For those who are teachers in districts where the schools do NOT draw up IEPs before the IEP meeting, perhaps they can share how their districts handle the matter?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

So how do you suggest it should be done if entering the meeting with a draft is inappropriate?

 It takes me several hours to write an IEP. It would take even longer if I was discussing each section with a group of people. We have at least 6-7 IEP meetings each staffing day. If we didn't start the meeting with a draft we could only get through one or two a day.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 2, 2013 at 8:47 AM
1 mom liked this

Your original statement was:

"This particular issue of schools drawing up a "draft" of the IEPs prior to the IEP meeting has been a long standing issue that is a violation of violation of parent's rights to equal participation."

I enter every IEP meeting with a draft of the IEP. I don't know a school that does it differently. If you look at the replies in this post it's pretty obvious that's how it's typically done. But you're telling the OP, and anyone else who reads this thread, their rights have been violated by that procedure. That's just plain not true. 

In this reply you clarify that refusing to alter the draft is a violation. That's very different from your original statement. 

Now you're saying teachers should have goals jotted down ahead of time. How is that different from a draft? I should have them on a separate piece of paper and have everyone sit and watch me retype them during the meeting?

Please be very careful before telling people their rights are being violated. I don't know what experiences you've had, but I can assure you that my school personnel takes great care to ensure we follow the letter of the law and protect the rights of the students and parents. I do many of the things you are telling the OP are wrong. It's very frustrating to have a third part telling parents schools aren't advocating for them when they really don't know that to be true at all. 


Quoting DyslexiaParent:

There are various ways different schools/districts handle this.  Some draw up a list of goals they'd like to consider adding and they send a copy of those to the parents in a PWN 5-10 days before the IEP meeting.. Basically saying, "These are possible goals I'd like us to discuss at the meeting" or some districts use those IEP generating packages where they have someone in the meeting who is selecting or typing in a goal as it is discussed and decided in the IEP meeting.  I realize there is a lot of work that is required in managing the IEPs of all of the kids, so it is natural (and truthfully expected) that a teacher would have thought about and jotted down possible goals ahead of time.  IMHO, the violations of IDEA come in when the district pretty much presents the parent with the IEP as the district thinks it should be and then 'discusses it with the parent'.. even if the parent is allowed to make suggestions for changes. 

The premade IEP is what has been the issue in the cases I've known because what ends up in the IEP is pretty much what the writer of the IEP unilaterally decided should be in there.   Seldom, once an IEP is drawn up by any one individual, is there any meaningful or substantiative change made to the IEP in the meeting because discussion is minimized and it's more like going through a checklist. 

Trust me, I realize there is a lot of hard work for the school and there are MANY parents who don't really care to be all that involved in the IEP process until their child doesn't make any meaningful progress year after year... In those cases it is really, really easy for the school to assume the role of creator of the IEP while dismissing a parent as disinterested.  The problem I then see is that the district, when using such practices, even applies them towards parents who are highly interested in being involved in the planning and education of the child.  Then there begins to be more contention, the school gets at odds with the parent--often labeling the parent as "difficult" or a "problem parent", when in fact--the parent is a highly responsible parent who has a vested interest in the child's education.  I think if a school gets into a standard way of operating that is, shall we say 'efficient' for themselves in dealing with a number of disinterested parents, they can end up causing major problems and issues with the parents that want to be involved every step of the way.

Because of IDEA & the parental right to be an equal member of the IEP team, I think it is prudent to always meet parental rights as if the parent is an "interested party" and even really seeking to work well with the more interested parents for the sake of the child.  A parent who IS interested in being involved can be one of the greatest partners for the school because that parent is usually more willing to put in extra effort with their child in the evening, etc.   If, for example, a school gets into the practice of sending those goal ideas to every parent before the IEP meeting, they are going to meet the needs of the parent who wants to be involved.

It's a tricky act to balance, for sure, but in cases like the OP.. Where she wants the results of the evaluation before being expected to make decisions upon the IEP, it is good that her school is willing to have a secondary meeting.    I see lots of schools who outright refuse to provide results ahead of time and don't want to have another meeting because it is "too difficult to schedule everyone." --That it is, but in not helping the parent have meaningful participation, the district is failing to treat the parent as a professional member of the IEP team.. And the parent IS a professional because she / he  has more intimate knowledge of the child than anyone else in the room.  Thus, when I see schools who have a parent that WANTS to be involved, I just really have a difficult time understanding why the school doesn't embrace parental involvement.  More often the schools complain about the lack of involvement of the parents, but not EVERY parent is uninvolved.

I hope that makes sense.  I know from my original post it may seem like I don't understand the school's side... I DO understand.  It's just that parents need to know they have a right to be equal members and the schools often don't realize the ways in which they dismiss parents as if the parents don't matter, which really IS an issue when it comes to parents who want to be involved with their children educationally. 

For those who are teachers in districts where the schools do NOT draw up IEPs before the IEP meeting, perhaps they can share how their districts handle the matter?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

So how do you suggest it should be done if entering the meeting with a draft is inappropriate?

 It takes me several hours to write an IEP. It would take even longer if I was discussing each section with a group of people. We have at least 6-7 IEP meetings each staffing day. If we didn't start the meeting with a draft we could only get through one or two a day.


mjande4
by Platinum Member on Mar. 2, 2013 at 8:53 AM
2 moms liked this

I've been following this thread and until now have not commented.  I have been part of literally hundreds of IEP meetings in my career.  Every teacher/counselor, etc. that I have sat in with only had one goal in mind and that was to assist the student.  I have never seen an IEP finalized BEFORE the actual meeting, in fact, if that was the case I would be super pissed, because MY time is valuable and I do NOT want it wasted if my input isn't needed/wanted.  I also have seen what happens when a parent comes in "demanding" things and not working with the school.  It puts everyone on the defensive and rarely ends well for the student.  As for pushing a meeting back, that can/will result in less input/help from the very people that you need at the meeting.  There is so much coordinating to be done.  The OP seems to be very anxious about this meeting and in some ways is focusing on herself and not her daughter.  The SOONER she gets the results, and sets the IEP up, the SOONER her daughter will get the help she needs.  I'm sure it is nerve wracking and heart wrenching to potentially hear that there are problems with your child, BUT the adult in you needs to push that aside and meet with the school and go from there.  The IEP does NOT have to be agreed to on the spot.

Tryshx
by on Mar. 2, 2013 at 9:03 AM

I completely agree with you about parental rights and involvement... And we don't have an IEP yet (we're still in the testing process) but when we had our BIP the school had a list of possible, for lack of a better word (or because one escapes me at this moment), situations and solutions for DSS's behavior problems, but they refused to talk to us about anything before the meeting and then if we didn't agree with something then it was taken off the table, and then we actually added things to the BIP that the school hadn't thought of or that the school wasn't sure would work for him and then the teacher, the team, the principal AND we had to sign off on it before it could become effective...

But like I said they wouldn't tell us anything about the meeting (we were lucky to drag out that it was a behavior plan meeting beforehand lol) before we were in the conference room discussing everything... maybe the policies are different from  school to school...




Quoting DyslexiaParent:

There are various ways different schools/districts handle this.  Some draw up a list of goals they'd like to consider adding and they send a copy of those to the parents in a PWN 5-10 days before the IEP meeting.. Basically saying, "These are possible goals I'd like us to discuss at the meeting" or some districts use those IEP generating packages where they have someone in the meeting who is selecting or typing in a goal as it is discussed and decided in the IEP meeting.  I realize there is a lot of work that is required in managing the IEPs of all of the kids, so it is natural (and truthfully expected) that a teacher would have thought about and jotted down possible goals ahead of time.  IMHO, the violations of IDEA come in when the district pretty much presents the parent with the IEP as the district thinks it should be and then 'discusses it with the parent'.. even if the parent is allowed to make suggestions for changes. 

The premade IEP is what has been the issue in the cases I've known because what ends up in the IEP is pretty much what the writer of the IEP unilaterally decided should be in there.   Seldom, once an IEP is drawn up by any one individual, is there any meaningful or substantiative change made to the IEP in the meeting because discussion is minimized and it's more like going through a checklist. 

Trust me, I realize there is a lot of hard work for the school and there are MANY parents who don't really care to be all that involved in the IEP process until their child doesn't make any meaningful progress year after year... In those cases it is really, really easy for the school to assume the role of creator of the IEP while dismissing a parent as disinterested.  The problem I then see is that the district, when using such practices, even applies them towards parents who are highly interested in being involved in the planning and education of the child.  Then there begins to be more contention, the school gets at odds with the parent--often labeling the parent as "difficult" or a "problem parent", when in fact--the parent is a highly responsible parent who has a vested interest in the child's education.  I think if a school gets into a standard way of operating that is, shall we say 'efficient' for themselves in dealing with a number of disinterested parents, they can end up causing major problems and issues with the parents that want to be involved every step of the way.

Because of IDEA & the parental right to be an equal member of the IEP team, I think it is prudent to always meet parental rights as if the parent is an "interested party" and even really seeking to work well with the more interested parents for the sake of the child.  A parent who IS interested in being involved can be one of the greatest partners for the school because that parent is usually more willing to put in extra effort with their child in the evening, etc.   If, for example, a school gets into the practice of sending those goal ideas to every parent before the IEP meeting, they are going to meet the needs of the parent who wants to be involved.

It's a tricky act to balance, for sure, but in cases like the OP.. Where she wants the results of the evaluation before being expected to make decisions upon the IEP, it is good that her school is willing to have a secondary meeting.    I see lots of schools who outright refuse to provide results ahead of time and don't want to have another meeting because it is "too difficult to schedule everyone." --That it is, but in not helping the parent have meaningful participation, the district is failing to treat the parent as a professional member of the IEP team.. And the parent IS a professional because she / he  has more intimate knowledge of the child than anyone else in the room.  Thus, when I see schools who have a parent that WANTS to be involved, I just really have a difficult time understanding why the school doesn't embrace parental involvement.  More often the schools complain about the lack of involvement of the parents, but not EVERY parent is uninvolved.

I hope that makes sense.  I know from my original post it may seem like I don't understand the school's side... I DO understand.  It's just that parents need to know they have a right to be equal members and the schools often don't realize the ways in which they dismiss parents as if the parents don't matter, which really IS an issue when it comes to parents who want to be involved with their children educationally. 

For those who are teachers in districts where the schools do NOT draw up IEPs before the IEP meeting, perhaps they can share how their districts handle the matter?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

So how do you suggest it should be done if entering the meeting with a draft is inappropriate?

 It takes me several hours to write an IEP. It would take even longer if I was discussing each section with a group of people. We have at least 6-7 IEP meetings each staffing day. If we didn't start the meeting with a draft we could only get through one or two a day.


maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 2, 2013 at 9:14 AM

I am really confused by this.

Your replies seem to indicate you have lots of experience in this area.

If it violated a parent's rights to draft an IEP (as you said) and you've dealt with this often why can't you explain how it is done when it's done correctly?

Quoting DyslexiaParent:


For those who are teachers in districts where the schools do NOT draw up IEPs before the IEP meeting, perhaps they can share how their districts handle the matter?

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

So how do you suggest it should be done if entering the meeting with a draft is inappropriate?

 It takes me several hours to write an IEP. It would take even longer if I was discussing each section with a group of people. We have at least 6-7 IEP meetings each staffing day. If we didn't start the meeting with a draft we could only get through one or two a day.


thebailiffs
by Bronze Member on Mar. 2, 2013 at 10:46 AM
2 moms liked this

Dyselxiaparent-

Thank-you for your last message stating that you understand some parents don't care. As I have said I work with 27 families and have for almost 6 years. I sit in close to 30 IEPs every year. I agree with another poster, we ALL come together for the best of the child. That is why we work as hard as we do. We want progress for the child. 

I will say I do not have a single parent like you. In fact, one familiy just never shows up. We still do evereything the way we should, in fact I tried 5 different ways to contact this parent, including driving to their house and offered to drive the parent to the meeting.  So please understand you are unique.  But I am still not clear what you want us to do... Are you saying you want us to come with blank forms and fill them in at the meeting? That it would be a violation of parents right if we put your name and address on the paperwork? Most meetings are very long when there are a number of specialist involved. 

To put it in simple terms, education is a continual process the child learns one skill on as assessment and we move onto the next skill. With the goal of the child learning. Now of course every child is different and makes progress at different paces.  

It is great you know so much about the IEP process, but knowing how hard we teachers work daily is another thing.  At my school most IEP's are set at the beginning of the year or 6 months before the date.  Some assessments take a number of sessions to work with the child, then there is the collaboration and writing it up. The whole process is complicated. 

Now, to the OP. I am curious do you have any connection with the person doing the assessmnet? Could you have a conversation with the Specialist to see about discussing the results on the phone before the meeting? Or you could get the results, not sign the IEP and then go over everything with your family then go back with a list of what you want to change. I see this happen a lot. 

One last thing, we had a new family come into our district and at the first IEP  the mom (who didn't know us) brought in a plate of home made cookies for us. DO YOU KNOW WHAT THAT DID FOR US? Wow, it showed us how much she cared about us.  This is so rare... think about how good that made us feel that she was willing to thank us for all we do for her son. 

We are not perfect but most of us do out best.

MsLogansMommy
by Bronze Member on Mar. 2, 2013 at 4:12 PM

 

I don't understand why you think this is an unusual request when it is the actual law that a parent has the right to review the records before the IEP meeting. I am not trying to be difficult I just want an opportunity to prepare for the meeting and in fact this would, in my opinion, be beneficial to everyone at the meeting regarding their time as well. Why waste their time having them come to a meeting that is just going to be rescheduled? That to me seems like a waste of time. I need to review the reports, process the information, do some of my own research and formulate my questions and suggestions. This will take time. I understand that some parents may not be as involved in their childs education and that is very sad to me but I am not one of those moms I am involved, I am educated, I am resourceful, I am an "equal" member of my daughters IEP team and I expect to be treated as one.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

So do you think they're lying when they say they're finalizing the reports? 

That was a possible explanation offered earlier and I'm sure it's true. It's often a mad dash to get everything done before the meeting because of the massive amount of testing and paper work that needs to be done.  Once the testing is done the psychologist needs to put everything into a narrative so everyone can understand it. It takes hours to do that well. 

This isn't typical request so I'm sure you've caught the school off guard. Rescheduling meetings is complicated because it many people need to change their schedules and some of those people probably work at several different schools and are coordinating schedules with many other people.  Meetings are booked weeks in advance.  The only way to reschedule would be to push the meeting back weeks.  So the fact that the school doesn't want to automatically reschedule in case you need time is understandable. 

I really hope you're not assuming the school is trying to pull one over on you. Your request is very unusual. I'm sure they don't have procedure in place for getting reports out early and moving meeting is more complicated than it sounds. 


Quoting MsLogansMommy:

 

They are very careful not to flat out refuse to give me the reports ahead of time since they have no legal right to do so however they are not cooperating either. They are telling me that they will go over the reports at the meeting and that they are finalizing the reports and if we need to schedule another meeting to allow me more time to review them then we can do so at the IEP meeting. I responded that I would like to reschedule the date now then since I am quite sure that I will need time to review the information in order for me to be an equal part of the IEP team. Basically my whole issue is that I don't want to be sitting in a meeting with 5 other people and be learning this info for the first time and possibly be shocked or saddened or whatever it is I dont want to experience those emotions in a room with strangers I want to be at home with family learning about the areas that my daughter struggles and I am sure I will have questions but I think is would make the actual meeting more efficient because I will have prepared my questions beforehand and if they answer my questions in the explanation that is fine but if I am feeling emotional I many not be as effective as I can be with preparation. and then there is that other small issue that it is my legal right to have the reports before the meeting.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting MsLogansMommy:

I understand that at the IEP meeting they will be going over the evaluations and explaining things but I do not see what harm it is for the parents to get a copy of the reports ahead of time since it is the parents legal right to do so.

What explanation did the school give you? Did they refuse to give them to you, or did they say they don't normally do it? There's a big difference. 

 

 


 

 

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Mar. 2, 2013 at 4:22 PM

Not all parents are educated and to give you data without explanation sets the stage for all sorts of miscommunication. That's why the information is presented at the meeting by the professionals. I know that you want the best for your daughter and want to work WITH the school. Don't automatically assume that they are "out to get you". Allow the team to present their findings and then process it and work together. You have repeatedly said how much you like your daughter's teacher. Well, she's a BIG part of this IEP team and I'm sure that she wants the best for your daughter too. Take a deep breath and try not to over think this.

Quoting MsLogansMommy:


I don't understand why you think this is an unusual request when it is the actual law that a parent has the right to review the records before the IEP meeting. I am not trying to be difficult I just want an opportunity to prepare for the meeting and in fact this would in my opinion be beneficial to everyone at the meeting regarding their time as well why waste their time having them come to a meeting that is just going to be rescheduled that to me seems like a waste of time. I need to review the reports, process the information, do some of my own research and formulate my questions and suggestions this will take time. I understand that some parents may not be as involved in their childs education and that is very sad to me but I am not one of those moms I am involved, I am educated, I am resourceful and I am an "equal" member of my daughters IEP team and I expect to be treated as one.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

So do you think they're lying when they say they're finalizing the reports? 

That was a possible explanation offered earlier and I'm sure it's true. It's often a mad dash to get everything done before the meeting because of the massive amount of testing and paper work that needs to be done.  Once the testing is done the psychologist needs to put everything into a narrative so everyone can understand it. It takes hours to do that well. 

This isn't typical request so I'm sure you've caught the school off guard. Rescheduling meetings is complicated because it many people need to change their schedules and some of those people probably work at several different schools and are coordinating schedules with many other people.  Meetings are booked weeks in advance.  The only way to reschedule would be to push the meeting back weeks.  So the fact that the school doesn't want to automatically reschedule in case you need time is understandable. 

I really hope you're not assuming the school is trying to pull one over on you. Your request is very unusual. I'm sure they don't have procedure in place for getting reports out early and moving meeting is more complicated than it sounds. 


Quoting MsLogansMommy:


They are very careful not to flat out refuse to give me the reports ahead of time since they have no legal right to do so however they are not cooperating either. They are telling me that they will go over the reports at the meeting and that they are finalizing the reports and if we need to schedule another meeting to allow me more time to review them then we can do so at the IEP meeting. I responded that I would like to reschedule the date now then since I am quite sure that I will need time to review the information in order for me to be an equal part of the IEP team. Basically my whole issue is that I don't want to be sitting in a meeting with 5 other people and be learning this info for the first time and possibly be shocked or saddened or whatever it is I dont want to experience those emotions in a room with strangers I want to be at home with family learning about the areas that my daughter struggles and I am sure I will have questions but I think is would make the actual meeting more efficient because I will have prepared my questions beforehand and if they answer my questions in the explanation that is fine but if I am feeling emotional I many not be as effective as I can be with preparation. and then there is that other small issue that it is my legal right to have the reports before the meeting.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting MsLogansMommy:

I understand that at the IEP meeting they will be going over the evaluations and explaining things but I do not see what harm it is for the parents to get a copy of the reports ahead of time since it is the parents legal right to do so.

What explanation did the school give you? Did they refuse to give them to you, or did they say they don't normally do it? There's a big difference. 








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