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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

I'm at a loss...

Posted by on Mar. 4, 2013 at 4:36 PM
  • 12 Replies
Ds is 7 and in the 2nd grade. His 1st grade experience was horrible, and now he just doesn't care. I've talked to his teacher, she's convinced he's just a problem child from what she heard last year, I've talked to the principal.... nothing. His grades are falling simply because he doesn't care, it's just hurry up and get it done and whatever. I've tried grounding him, taking away games, pulling him out of sports until his grades are up.... you name it.. he doesn't care for more than a day. What else can I do to make him see that school us important?!
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by on Mar. 4, 2013 at 4:36 PM
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Replies (1-10):
M4LG5
by Gold Member on Mar. 4, 2013 at 4:39 PM
2 moms liked this
Instead of negative consequences, try positive ones. Reward him by allowing him to do things when you see positive behavior and effort.
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steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Mar. 4, 2013 at 4:39 PM

Are you sure that he understands the material and is able to actually do the work?  Sometimes kids act like they don't care when they really don't understand the work.

RedSoxWife
by on Mar. 4, 2013 at 6:15 PM
He understands it, because I make him do the make up homework. I've started giving things back to him when he brings home a better grade, but it's like he doesn't connect the two? His teacher says that he's testing at a low level for reading, but when he's home he reads chapter books fine.
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MJP76
by on Mar. 4, 2013 at 6:17 PM

Homeschool him.

sahmw2010
by Bronze Member on Mar. 4, 2013 at 6:35 PM
My DD 8yrs is an amazing reader, but she has a low grade in reading because she is having issues on the tests. at this age there has to be an underlying problem. bullies, needing glasses (yes i have seen this in my nephew) or a learning problem. something is making him shut down when it comes to school. and while it is frusterating that he "just doesnt care" you need to find that underlying problem. i know its not easy.
Quoting RedSoxWife:

He understands it, because I make him do the make up homework. I've started giving things back to him when he brings home a better grade, but it's like he doesn't connect the two? His teacher says that he's testing at a low level for reading, but when he's home he reads chapter books fine.
M4LG5
by Gold Member on Mar. 4, 2013 at 6:47 PM
Ask the teacher specifically what issues he is having with reading. Maybe its something you are not paying to at home. For example, it may not be reading the words but he has issues with comprehensive.

Quoting RedSoxWife:

He understands it, because I make him do the make up homework. I've started giving things back to him when he brings home a better grade, but it's like he doesn't connect the two? His teacher says that he's testing at a low level for reading, but when he's home he reads chapter books fine.
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maxswolfsuit
by Max on Mar. 4, 2013 at 6:54 PM


Quoting RedSoxWife:

He understands it, because I make him do the make up homework. I've started giving things back to him when he brings home a better grade, but it's like he doesn't connect the two? His teacher says that he's testing at a low level for reading, but when he's home he reads chapter books fine.

I agree with the previous reply. It's not uncommon for parents to think kids are reading fine when they are in fact struggling with very specific important skills. 

Schedule a conference to find out what assessments have been given and exactly where he is scoring below grade level. 


RedSoxWife
by on Mar. 4, 2013 at 7:40 PM
I have done this, she says it's his reading comprehension. So I put him in the early morning reading class before school, I took him to the optometrist 2 months ago and got him some nice looking glasses. He comprehends what he reads at home, after he reads it I ask him questions on characters, the plot and so on.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting RedSoxWife:

He understands it, because I make him do the make up homework. I've started giving things back to him when he brings home a better grade, but it's like he doesn't connect the two? His teacher says that he's testing at a low level for reading, but when he's home he reads chapter books fine.

I agree with the previous reply. It's not uncommon for parents to think kids are reading fine when they are in fact struggling with very specific important skills. 

Schedule a conference to find out what assessments have been given and exactly where he is scoring below grade level. 


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M4LG5
by Gold Member on Mar. 4, 2013 at 7:44 PM
How do you know he understands it? Ask the teacher for recommendations of how to get him to develop his comprehension. Again, how you are doing it may be different than how his teacher is doing it.

Quoting RedSoxWife:

I have done this, she says it's his reading comprehension. So I put him in the early morning reading class before school, I took him to the optometrist 2 months ago and got him some nice looking glasses. He comprehends what he reads at home, after he reads it I ask him questions on characters, the plot and so on.



Quoting maxswolfsuit:


Quoting RedSoxWife:

He understands it, because I make him do the make up homework. I've started giving things back to him when he brings home a better grade, but it's like he doesn't connect the two? His teacher says that he's testing at a low level for reading, but when he's home he reads chapter books fine.

I agree with the previous reply. It's not uncommon for parents to think kids are reading fine when they are in fact struggling with very specific important skills. 

Schedule a conference to find out what assessments have been given and exactly where he is scoring below grade level. 


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corrinacs
by on Mar. 4, 2013 at 9:37 PM

Ask him why he's so apathetic about it.  HOnestly, sit him down, nonjudgementally, and talk to him about it.  He's at the age where he should be capable of talking to you about it.  

Let him know you love him, and that you really want him to succeed at school.  Once he knows its important, he can talk to you about why he hates it.  Some common themes you may hear:

1. Boredom.  This is particularly true of gifted children.  Many gifted children are left by teh wayside because of this "side effect".  Teachers think they are apathetic because they dont' understand the material, and they may even act dumb after a while as teachers/parents say they aren't doing well.  But in actuality, they are very smart and are just bored.  After hours and hours and hourse spent in boredom, anyone would start acting apathetic.  IF this is what's going on, tell him he needs to try harder to show his teacher....once his teacher notices (and oyu talk to her) they can put him into programs to help him with harder work that may be much more interesting :).

2. Abuse/bullying.  This is one of the first symptoms of bullying.  It can happen to/from anyone.  It could be his teacher even.  Make sure if he does start talking about bullying, you take his story seriuosly, but don't go overboard with it.  Get the facts you can from him, and then sit down with him and his teacher/principal to talk about what may have happened.  Hopefully they can come to the realization this is what's going on and do something about it (separation between him and the perpetrators, etc)

3. He's having a learning disability somewhere.  Doesn't even have to be huge, but once he looses one area, domino effect takes hold and he has a hard time understanding the rest of hte concepts.  Find what subjects cause him problems.  What specifically is he having problems with.  This will require a talk with the teacher.  Hopefully she can recommend some ways to fix it, either he can stay after school with her for extra tutoring.  Perhaps older children can tutor, etc.

4. Other htings going on at school or home.  Any significant (especially sudden) change can turn your once happy child into an apathetic (almost teenager-like).  Just get to the bottom of it and figure out ways to fix it together!

Good luck!

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