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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

How would you word this?

Posted by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:51 PM
  • 13 Replies

YDS(9) came home yesterday,very upset that he had failed a test in Math.Not only was he worried he would get in trouble,he was also worried that he would fail Math for the year.Keep in mind,YDS has never had a grade below a C.,so to fail a test is devastating to him.

He said that they were not given a study guide for the test.Nor have they had any homework dealing with division,which is what the test was on.

I explained to him that maybe the teacher just wanted to see where the kids were in their skills,and that it probably won't count as a grade.He is adamant that it will and that the teacher told them it counts.

So,I wanted to email the teacher and ask about the test,but I don't want to sound like one of those "how dare you do this to my kid?" parents.Any advice on how to word the email?Or is there no way to word it,without coming off as some nutty parent?

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by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 1:51 PM
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mom2many747
by Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 2:07 PM

Just explain to the teacher that your son came home very worried about failing a test. You weren't aware they had started division yet but you were wondering if it is something you should start working with him on. 

If the test is not graded she should respond with that. If it is and they indeed have not worked on that subject yet then politely ask her how it's beneficial to a student to be tested and graded on a subject that the children haven't been introduced to.

What grade is he in? My daughter is in 3rd and they finished division a few months ago. They are on measurement and time now. (she had a hard time with those fractions a few weeks ago lol)

m0m23b0ys458
by Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 2:08 PM

Thank you!!!This sounds great!!!

Quoting mom2many747:

Just explain to the teacher that your son came home very worried about failing a test. You weren't aware they had started division yet but you were wondering if it is something you should start working with him on. 

If the test is not graded she should respond with that. If it is and they indeed have not worked on that subject yet then politely ask her how it's beneficial to a student to be tested and graded on a subject that the children haven't been introduced to.


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Pukalani79
by Silver Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 3:06 PM
1 mom liked this

 I would let the teacher know that your son was very worried about the test, then see where the conversation goes.  I'm hoping that it was geared towards finding out what they already know.

soymujer
by Mikki on Mar. 22, 2013 at 4:28 PM


this sounds good

Quoting mom2many747:

Just explain to the teacher that your son came home very worried about failing a test. You weren't aware they had started division yet but you were wondering if it is something you should start working with him on. 

If the test is not graded she should respond with that. If it is and they indeed have not worked on that subject yet then politely ask her how it's beneficial to a student to be tested and graded on a subject that the children haven't been introduced to.

What grade is he in? My daughter is in 3rd and they finished division a few months ago. They are on measurement and time now. (she had a hard time with those fractions a few weeks ago lol)



family in the van   Mom of four


disneymom2two
by Silver Member on Mar. 22, 2013 at 5:36 PM

If they haven't been taught division yet, I would think this was a preassessment to see what they know.  I'm curious whether she told them it counts without any prompting or if she responded that it counts after a child asked.  There are unfortunately some kids who, if they think something doesn't count, will not put forth any effort.  It may not count as a grade but counts in terms of her knowing what she needs to work on with them.

QuirkyMom26
by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 10:05 PM

I don't know if this is the case but my DD's (9) come home some times with different stories. Maybe your son misheard the teacher say something about division and linked it to it being on the test they had to take. I guess the first thing I'd do is let the teacher know your son is concerned about the content of the test.

Newfie_Mom
by on Mar. 22, 2013 at 10:11 PM
We just had this same thing!! My daughter came home with a 68% in literal tears because she got such a low grade. She wasn't even upset she would get in trouble just that she had failed. (She has very high expectations for herself she is extremely competitive and is used to being the best at everything) I emailed the teacher and asked her what I could have done to prevent it. That way it didn't sound accusatory. She sent home work sheets for us to work on together and then let DD retake the test for a higher grade (not a perfect score because that wouldn't be fair but it got her up to passing instead of a fail on the test)
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Corsette1008
by on Mar. 25, 2013 at 11:25 AM
Like others said, I would talk to the teacher and tell him/her what your child told you. I would also encourage your son to study on his own too, especially if he knew there was going to be a test. My daughter is the same way about her grades so I do the same with her, I also give her practice tests at home and we make flash cards or practice on the white board.
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m0m23b0ys458
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 12:01 PM
Can't study for a test you don't know you're going to have.There was no earning, no study guide, nothing.

Quoting Corsette1008:

Like others said, I would talk to the teacher and tell him/her what your child told you. I would also encourage your son to study on his own too, especially if he knew there was going to be a test. My daughter is the same way about her grades so I do the same with her, I also give her practice tests at home and we make flash cards or practice on the white board.
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m0m23b0ys458
by Member on Mar. 25, 2013 at 12:01 PM
Can't study for a test you don't know you're going to have.There was no earning, no study guide, nothing.

Quoting Corsette1008:

Like others said, I would talk to the teacher and tell him/her what your child told you. I would also encourage your son to study on his own too, especially if he knew there was going to be a test. My daughter is the same way about her grades so I do the same with her, I also give her practice tests at home and we make flash cards or practice on the white board.
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