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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Do you think United States should have school year round ?

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Higher Education Attainment


The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s 2012 Education at a Glance report has found that while the U.S. boasts high education attainment levels overall, it lags behind other countries that are increasing attainment levels at a higher rate.

The report analyzed the education systems of the 34 OECD member countries in addition to Argentina, Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Russia, Saudi Arabia and South Africa.

In the U.S., 42 percent of all 25-64 year-old have reached higher education -- making it one of the most well educated countries in the world, but behind Canada (51 percent), Israel (46 percent), Japan (45 percent) and the Russian Federation (54 percent). When it comes to the young adult population, however, the U.S. ranks 14th among 37 OECD and G20 countries in the percentage of 25-34 year-olds boasting higher education attainment, at 42 percent. This puts it above the OECD average of 38 percent, but over 20 percentage points behind the leader, Korea, at 65 percent.

According to the report, higher education attainment levels in the U.S. are growing at a below-average rate compared to other OECD and G20 countries. Between 2000 and 2010, attainment levels in the U.S. increased by an average of 1.3 percentage points annually, while its OECD counterparts boasted a 3.7 percentage-point increase per year overall.

“Based on these trends, the U.S. may find that an increasing number of countries will approach or surpass its attainment levels in the coming years,” the U.S. country report reads. “Other countries in this situation include Estonia, Finland, Israel and the Russian Federation.”

Do you think if United States focus on provide year round education can it help students to perform well  ?

Do you think United States should have year round schooling ?


by on Mar. 30, 2013 at 8:29 PM
Replies (41-50):
RADmomma
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 1:28 AM
We homeschool and we do some sort of learning all year round,
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BuckeyezRule
by Laura on Mar. 31, 2013 at 2:46 AM

Same. I miss year round. I loved traveling during off times. I also liked the breaks at different times. We'd do winter activities, go home for a holiday (we live in Utah, family in ohio, where we are from) , things we can't do now w/o pulling the kids out of school since the time off is short, and travel is expensive. We were year round, 4 tracks, 8 classes per grade from ds k-2. Dd k. Opened a new school 1/2 mile from our home in fall of '11 (our school is 1/10th mile) , and we went traditional, 'only' 6 classes per grade. Lol we are set to go back to year round fall 2014. The new school is going year round this fall. We are growing out in our area. But, I love all the kids around. :)


Quoting wakymom:

We've had ds1 in schools w/ both traditional and yr-round calendars. I liked the yr-round one, for the most part. He did miss out on Vacation Bible School b/c it was always held while he was still in regular school, but other than that, it was nice. We could take a longer trip during off-peak times of the yr; he had 3 wks off for fall break, 2 wks off for winter break, 3 wks for spring break, and the month of July off for summer vacation.













tuplamama
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 2:49 AM

 Year around school would be such a sad thing. Childhood is way too short anyway. We have alltogerher over 3 months vacation time for students and our weekly hours are much much smaller than in USA and kids don't start school until they are 7 years old - yet we are doing OK in international studies like PISA.

What Americans should remember that not all countries value college education same way than USA. For example in my home country people think what they actually want to do and educate themselves accordingly. Universities are not looked as something "better" or "higher".

 

 

 


Your clitoris has over 8000 sensitive nerve endings.......... foreskin has over 20 000.


 




 

BuckeyezRule
by Laura on Mar. 31, 2013 at 2:59 AM

Maybe we are talking apples and oranges? Our year round is to hold off building new schools as long as possible. Thus, saving $$$ by not building a new school until the district has to. :) I do like and support year round, but, not at the expense of tax payers, unless achievements did/do increase. Ours is more necessity. I miss the small breaks. :)

and yes, year round doesn't increase the amount of times and days, just split it up.

I do agree, outside factors (pp) are huge impacts.


Quoting mjande4:

We had a school that was given a several million dollar grant over five years to implement year round. The plug was pulled because it did NOT increase student achievement and costs A LOT more.

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

I want to clarify that doing a year round calendar and actually having students attend school more often are two very different things. 

Different regions in the US have experimented with year round calendars. But that was just taking the 180 day school year and distributing it more evenly over 12 months. Those kids didn't attend more school than others. They just had several short breaks as opposed to one long summer break.

I don't think our culture is open to the idea of kids spending more time in school. Extending the school year without addressing other concerns isn't going to fix the problem. The kids who can't thrive because of outside factors will continue to struggle. 

I will say I think the fact that summer programs have been cut in many places is a huge issue. For some students quality instruction during the summer can be the difference between long term success and failure. 





TroyboysMom
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 3:20 AM

I think if the quality of education was standard across the board, there really isn't anything overtly wrong with the year-round model (tracks of students alternating "on" periods with "off" periods.). The decreased length of breaks decreases the retention deficits, decreases the educational minutes/time spent in review of content, and the frequency helps decrease burnout on both the students' and the teachers' parts. I also like that the variance allows for vacationing when the popular destinations may, per chance, be less crowded than at other times. Personally, I don't like heavily crowded locations, and feel that heavily populated areas decrease my enjoyment of the vacation. 

However, with the current system having been such a mainstay for so long, it would be incredibly difficult for parents to assimilate to a new system as a standard, versus a temporary application. A previous poster mentioned that her children participate in educational camps during off periods (my son does, as well, and he receives an outstanding education, so the desire to augment is clearly not dependent on subpar standards in a respective area), and that they choose, as a family, to deliberately plan their vacations during these periods. 

Also, the differences in child-care options are a hindrance to the implementation of this sort of plan - most child-care options operate on a "per student" basis, and the rotation may not be feasible with placement options - and for those parents who are dependent on after-school B.A.S.E.S.-type programs, the arrangements may be nigh on impossible.

As a general system, though, I think the potential for such a system is HUGE. Especially if it's handled well. 

aetrom
by Gold Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 4:01 AM
This. I do not think the federal gov. Should be able to make a blanket choice like that!!


Quoting AutymsMommy:

I don't think the United States, as a whole, should have anything to do with education...


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janitablue
by on Mar. 31, 2013 at 7:43 AM

You have made interest point. Thank you for your point view it was refreshing.


Quoting TroyboysMom:

I think if the quality of education was standard across the board, there really isn't anything overtly wrong with the year-round model (tracks of students alternating "on" periods with "off" periods.). The decreased length of breaks decreases the retention deficits, decreases the educational minutes/time spent in review of content, and the frequency helps decrease burnout on both the students' and the teachers' parts. I also like that the variance allows for vacationing when the popular destinations may, per chance, be less crowded than at other times. Personally, I don't like heavily crowded locations, and feel that heavily populated areas decrease my enjoyment of the vacation. 

However, with the current system having been such a mainstay for so long, it would be incredibly difficult for parents to assimilate to a new system as a standard, versus a temporary application. A previous poster mentioned that her children participate in educational camps during off periods (my son does, as well, and he receives an outstanding education, so the desire to augment is clearly not dependent on subpar standards in a respective area), and that they choose, as a family, to deliberately plan their vacations during these periods. 

Also, the differences in child-care options are a hindrance to the implementation of this sort of plan - most child-care options operate on a "per student" basis, and the rotation may not be feasible with placement options - and for those parents who are dependent on after-school B.A.S.E.S.-type programs, the arrangements may be nigh on impossible.

As a general system, though, I think the potential for such a system is HUGE. Especially if it's handled well. 



disneymom2two
by Silver Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 7:59 AM

So you're in favor of actual year round schooling, not just  breaking the school year up into different parts with shorter breaks?  Teachers' salaries would go up if they were required to work the whole year.  If its just that the year is broken up differently, that would hurt several teachers I work with who work the summer program or work tourism over the summer.  These jobs are available for the long summer break but would not be available for a few weeks here and there.


Quoting MsLogansMommy:


teachers would be employed year round 


Its been proven year round school is better for the kids. I don't know why we aren't already doing this.





quickbooksworm
by Bronze Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 8:17 AM
I can pay ahead if I want to. He does the programs at his karate school. I've never been able to do that because I spent most of the year scraping by. Last year mg ex stopped paying CS so I used my tax refund to pay the summer in full. This year I lost my job right after my refund same in so I had to use that to live. Now that I'm working and making more money than before, hopefully I'll be able to pay ahead.


Quoting Lorelai_Nicole:

I have a friend who puts away money during the school year--when she doesn't have to pay for daycare at all--into a savings account. That way when summer comes, and her kids are in all-day care, it's not as big a hit on her wallet.

Quoting quickbooksworm:

I've never had to quit my job, but summer daycare is 3x as much as my after school care. It would be nice to spread that out more.





Quoting MsLogansMommy:




I completely agree and would support year round school. I have heard that children lose so much of what they learned over the summer also if you look at the big picture it would help not just the child but everyone else and the economy teachers would be employed year round and working parents would have more options I know several people that have had to quit or lost their jobs because they didnt have any child care during the summer and if you think about the fact that we are suppose to be preparing our children to be adults most adult jobs don't have summers off just some things to think about



Quoting quickbooksworm:

Its been proven year round school is better for the kids. I don't know why we aren't already doing this.










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iuangina
by Member on Mar. 31, 2013 at 9:24 AM
2 moms liked this
I hate the idea that people feel their kids are entitled to anything. We don't want year round school because our kid deserve a break. That's a huge part of why homeschooled kids are so much further ahead than traditional school kids. As far as camps go, the camps would adjust their programs to the school calendar because they are all about making money. Any time you talk about change people get all crazy. The only reason we have summers off in thei first place is because kids used to have to work on the farms at that time of year. Very few people are still doing this, so why do we need a long break in the summer.

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