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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Transitioning one child from homeschool to brick and mortar school

Posted by on Apr. 5, 2013 at 10:10 AM
  • 9 Replies

I know she isn't in elementary school any more, but I've noticed that we have several moms with older children and that we have teachers spanning elementary through high school in the group.

Autumn has requested to go back to school next year. We will keep our younger children home until they request the same, lol. She will be attending a very small Catholic school (pre k - grade 8; 150 students total). She will be entering either grade 6 or grade 7 (very late birthday puts her technically but BARELY in grade 7 this fall; she is consistently working about a year behind in language arts, but years ahead in math). Considering her dyslexia and that she works a year behind in language arts (a skill set that requires incorporation across the content subjects), we are willing to place her where the principal feels it is best. They are known for being open to making accommodations for learning disabled children; we are also hoping that they can work with us to continue her acceleration in maths (she should be starting Algebra 1 this fall, after two years of prealgebra).


Now, my questions. If anyone in the group has either transitioned their child into a brick and mortar middle school, after homeschooling, what are some things you either DID work on first, or wish you had (in hindsight)?

Teachers - if you have received homeschooled children into your class, what were some things you wish the parents had worked first with the children on?

Off the top of my head, what we will be working on between now and August:

1) Raise your hand to speak

2) Organizational skills (keeping an agenda to track homework and tests) and study skills

3) Working in groups; delegating responsibilities within a group for group projects and assignments

4) Time management - she will need to work on being in a *place* at a specific time, grabbing things from her locker within that time, etc. I'm not sure how we will work on this at home. One perk of her being placed in grade 6 instead of grade 7 is that she would entering with other locker clueless children since they too are transitioning from an elementary grade with no class changes, lol!

5) Not being afraid to ask for help if she doesn't understand something (she can be timid about asking for help given her past experiences in schools several years ago).

6) Not being cocky about her strengths.

7) Not being ashamed of her weaknesses.


What am I missing?

I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














by on Apr. 5, 2013 at 10:10 AM
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Replies (1-9):
ramita
by Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 10:30 AM
How is she with people her age. I've never dealt with a homeschooling situation before so I'm not much help, but from personal experience 6 and 7 grades are pretty tough ages especially for girls. A lot of 'cliques' start at this age along with bullying type stuff. Hopefully since its a small school this stuff won't be so bad.
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AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 10:39 AM

She does fine with age peers. We belong to an active homeschool co-op that groups classes according to age/grade, her best friend is a neighborhood girl (same age but a grade lower due to missing the same cutoff that my dd barely makes), and she is involved in ballet at a reputable dance studio where she is with children within a few years of her age (both younger and older).

Any apprehension she has with children her age is an intense fear that she will again be picked on and made fun of for her learning differences (which was experienced in her last school, before we pulled her to homeschool) - which is why we are working on confidence building and recognizing that everybody has strengths and weaknesses... and that, frankly, if a person wants to pick on another, they will find a reason, no matter how petty.

She seems to get along better with children a grade lower, which is one reason we are considering holding her back a year. Because of where her birthday falls, for any group activity or sport that groups by age, the cutoff seems to be in July, placing her with children her age, but a grade lower (since her birthday is in August).



Quoting ramita:

How is she with people her age. I've never dealt with a homeschooling situation before so I'm not much help, but from personal experience 6 and 7 grades are pretty tough ages especially for girls. A lot of 'cliques' start at this age along with bullying type stuff. Hopefully since its a small school this stuff won't be so bad.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














Barabell
by Barbara on Apr. 5, 2013 at 10:40 AM

Can she shadow a student for a day? My son is in junior high, and he didn't shadow before changing from elementary to junior high. But he had 10 prospective students shadow him this year, and he seems to think it helped give them a better sense of the junior high. Next year, he's going to be looking at high schools, and I think I'm going to make sure he shadows at the prospective high schools we're considering.

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 10:45 AM
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That's a great question. I'm not sure if she can, but I'll be sure to ask. This is a perk that the existing students have that my daughter doesn't - they'll have been attending the same school from preschool through grade 8 and have a sense of *what is* in the junior high already, just from being there and the natural transition within the same school (since it goes through grade 8).

I'll ask. Thanks for the suggestion!

Quoting Barabell:

Can she shadow a student for a day? My son is in junior high, and he didn't shadow before changing from elementary to junior high. But he had 10 prospective students shadow him this year, and he seems to think it helped give them a better sense of the junior high. Next year, he's going to be looking at high schools, and I think I'm going to make sure he shadows at the prospective high schools we're considering.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














nomadbrat83
by Bronze Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 1:24 PM
I had students shadow me that were considering enrolling their child in the Catholic school I attended at the time (I was in 7th and 8th grade).

Quoting AutymsMommy:


That's a great question. I'm not sure if she can, but I'll be sure to ask. This is a perk that the existing students have that my daughter doesn't - they'll have been attending the same school from preschool through grade 8 and have a sense of *what is* in the junior high already, just from being there and the natural transition within the same school (since it goes through grade 8).

I'll ask. Thanks for the suggestion!


Quoting Barabell:

Can she shadow a student for a day? My son is in junior high, and he didn't shadow before changing from elementary to junior high. But he had 10 prospective students shadow him this year, and he seems to think it helped give them a better sense of the junior high. Next year, he's going to be looking at high schools, and I think I'm going to make sure he shadows at the prospective high schools we're considering.




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momtoBrenna
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 2:37 PM

I don't have experience with transitioning a middle school student but my dd did transition part of the way through first grade (this school year). The things that you are working on are all good but you may also want to give her some practice in dealing with mean kids and how to handle being bullied. It is likely to happen and she needs to know to when to handle it on her own and when to get adults involved. 

Pukalani79
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 10:33 PM

 I've done it, but my son was younger, so it was pretty easy for him to make that transition.  I don't have any suggestions for a middle-schooler. But good luck!

DrDoofenshmirtz
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 11:47 PM

Well, you have done a really good job thinking of most of what I would recommend.  I teach at a small, private school, and we typically get several new 6th graders each year (either not going on to public middle school or coming out of home schooling).  I would say you touched on the important things like organization and time management.  On your end, you can find out about how much homework is given each night and what the school does to help keep kids organized (for example, we order student planners for our kids and also have a website).  Also find out how kids are given homework (written on board, orally, etc.) and how it gets turned in.  As for friends, we typically match our new students up with a "buddy" who gets together with them a few times over the summer.  We match them based on interests.  A school as small as the one you describe should be able to do the same.

A few (small) issues I have noticed with my kids who were homeschooled and then come to me is that they often want to be able to ask questions about any topic at any time, even it if is not the one being presented.  Obviously, when homeschooling, this is not an issue, but in typical schools, it is.  Also, although our school is very child centered, some of the kids can also be pretty resistant to the structures we do have in place, and question it, sometimes in an almost disrespectful manner. 

Good luck to your DD!  Hopefully they can do a 6th grade placement but let her go to math with the older kids.  It may be that some other 6th/7th graders are taking algebra as well.  I know at our school 1/3 of our 7th graders take Algebra I.

AutymsMommy
by Silver Member on Apr. 5, 2013 at 11:52 PM


Thanks for the suggestions.

Having to wake up at a certain time because she will no longer have the ability to just work until 5 or 6 because she slept in... well, that's something we need to work on, lol! We have a lesson plan we follow, but no real start/stop time.

Quoting DrDoofenshmirtz:

Well, you have done a really good job thinking of most of what I would recommend.  I teach at a small, private school, and we typically get several new 6th graders each year (either not going on to public middle school or coming out of home schooling).  I would say you touched on the important things like organization and time management.  On your end, you can find out about how much homework is given each night and what the school does to help keep kids organized (for example, we order student planners for our kids and also have a website).  Also find out how kids are given homework (written on board, orally, etc.) and how it gets turned in.  As for friends, we typically match our new students up with a "buddy" who gets together with them a few times over the summer.  We match them based on interests.  A school as small as the one you describe should be able to do the same.

A few (small) issues I have noticed with my kids who were homeschooled and then come to me is that they often want to be able to ask questions about any topic at any time, even it if is not the one being presented.  Obviously, when homeschooling, this is not an issue, but in typical schools, it is.  Also, although our school is very child centered, some of the kids can also be pretty resistant to the structures we do have in place, and question it, sometimes in an almost disrespectful manner. 

Good luck to your DD!  Hopefully they can do a 6th grade placement but let her go to math with the older kids.  It may be that some other 6th/7th graders are taking algebra as well.  I know at our school 1/3 of our 7th graders take Algebra I.



I am a Home Schooling, Vaccinating, Non spanking, Nightmare Cuddling, Dessert Giving, Bedtime Kissing, Book Reading, Stay at Home Mom. I believe in the benefit of organized after school activities and nosy, involved parents. I believe in spoiling my children. I believe that I have seen the village and I do not want it anywhere near my children. Now for the controversial stuff: we have traditional gender roles, we're Catholic, I'm Libertarian, he's Republican, we're both conservative, and we own guns (now there's no need to ask, lol).             Aimee














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