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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Focus Help

Posted by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM
  • 13 Replies

 Any ideas out there on how to help my DD focus more? She is 8. If she could just focus more i think it would help her school work tremendously. I just don't know how you help a child learn to focus. I didn't have this issue with my DS he was really pretty focused in school. She is easily distracted in class by any little thing. Eventually i hope she can learn to zone alot of things out. There are always going to be distractions in life

by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:00 AM
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Replies (1-10):
momofjkkc
by Bronze Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:02 AM
Has she.bb been tested for add or adhd?
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mjande4
by Platinum Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:05 AM

When she works at home make sure that it's in an open, noisy area, i.e. the kitchen.  Many kids don't learn to ignore distractions and that's why they can not concentrate at school.

mom22tumblebugs
by Gold Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:09 AM

You can get those noise silencing headphones to muffle sound. Ask for the teacher to use folders are carrels. Have her desk moved away to an area where the kids aren't as talkative. It also helps to have her sit near quieter kids. Alert your teacher to help her redirect her attention back to her assignment.

If all else fails, have her tested for ADD.

She is 8 now, she will have much more maturity as she gets older, and self control to filter her environment.

lacyd75
by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:10 AM

 They said she is not adhd but that was by the school assments i'm thinking of having her tested outside of school. I've done some research on adhd and while she exhibits some of the signs she doesnt exhibit them all. But there are different types of adhd arent there?

Quoting momofjkkc:

Has she.bb been tested for add or adhd?

 

lacyd75
by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:13 AM

 Yeah thats what i don't get...because our house is definitely not a quiet household. I've never walked on eggshells since my kids were born so that they would get used to noise being there.

Quoting mjande4:

When she works at home make sure that it's in an open, noisy area, i.e. the kitchen.  Many kids don't learn to ignore distractions and that's why they can not concentrate at school.

 

momofjkkc
by Bronze Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:14 AM
Your pediatrician can test her.
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lacyd75
by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:18 AM

 Well they can't move her desk. Even in 2nd grade here at this school they use tables so therefore there are several kids per table which i don't much care for. Tables are fine for pre-k and K but after that i think kids should have individual desks. but thats just my opinion. and if i were to put silencing headphones on her i have to wonder if i'm not teaching her how to jus avoid instead of tackle the issue head on. And at home trust me we do ALOT of redirecting back to the assignments thats for sure. *sigh*

Quoting mom22tumblebugs:

You can get those noise silencing headphones to muffle sound. Ask for the teacher to use folders are carrels. Have her desk moved away to an area where the kids aren't as talkative. It also helps to have her sit near quieter kids. Alert your teacher to help her redirect her attention back to her assignment.

If all else fails, have her tested for ADD.

She is 8 now, she will have much more maturity as she gets older, and self control to filter her environment.

 

mom22tumblebugs
by Gold Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:39 AM

 My dd's classroom had headphones for the kids to put on, and several did, and her school occupational therapist also provided her with earplugs if she needed them. If it helps her focus, it is something.  It isn't about avoiding. Some kids have trouble filtering sensory stimulation. That is how she is wired. It isn't about teaching her how to work in the environment unaided, but by learning what helps her cope with it better and adapt, and to ask for help when needed. She may not be able to move desks, but her teacher can move her seating arrangement to better help her focus and attention.

If you have to redirect her a lot at home when you are 1:1, then think of it at school where the teacher can't give that kind of attention to her. In that case, you need to open discussion with the teacher, school special ed staff (occupational therapist, school psychologist etc) to get her help or special accomodations in the classroom to help her focus. She may even qualify for an aide or shared aide in the class. My daughter had a shared aide when she was in 2nd grade, even if it was just to help her by tapping on her desk to say, "keep working. Do you understand the directions? Or do you need help?"

My dd had focus issues in 2nd grade, so I know how the school tried to help her, but you seem unwilling to consider other options than the "gut it out" approach. No offense.   (BTW- my dd is now in 4th grade. She is still distractable, covers her ears at assemblies, sometimes wears headphones or earplugs, doesn't like noisy environments, gets mad when her classmates talk to her when they aren't supposed to talking, doesn't share an aide anymore, but is also the top of her class. And she is adapting better every day.


Quoting lacyd75:

 Well they can't move her desk. Even in 2nd grade here at this school they use tables so therefore there are several kids per table which i don't much care for. Tables are fine for pre-k and K but after that i think kids should have individual desks. but thats just my opinion. and if i were to put silencing headphones on her i have to wonder if i'm not teaching her how to jus avoid instead of tackle the issue head on. And at home trust me we do ALOT of redirecting back to the assignments thats for sure. *sigh*

Quoting mom22tumblebugs:

You can get those noise silencing headphones to muffle sound. Ask for the teacher to use folders are carrels. Have her desk moved away to an area where the kids aren't as talkative. It also helps to have her sit near quieter kids. Alert your teacher to help her redirect her attention back to her assignment.

If all else fails, have her tested for ADD.

She is 8 now, she will have much more maturity as she gets older, and self control to filter her environment.

 


 

lacyd75
by on Apr. 18, 2013 at 10:48 AM

 Not trying to come across as unwilling to try options. I'm all for trying options. I have had meeting with her teacher, the principal, and the conselor. Maybe it's time to have another meeting. I do know her teacher does re-arrange the seating at the tables. I don't know mayb trying to muffle it out is the way to go for the time being. I will have to ask her teacher if they have earphones for that and if not i will jus buy them if thats what i need to do. She sounds alot like your DD actually. She also doesn't like other kids talking in class when they shouldn't be and loud things like assemblies and stuff don't fly well with her. guess it's time to talk to her teacher again. I have to try something. She struggles as it is with no distractions much less with them. At this point she may even be doing 2nd grade again next year. Thanks for the help.

Quoting mom22tumblebugs:

 My dd's classroom had headphones for the kids to put on, and several did, and her school occupational therapist also provided her with earplugs if she needed them. If it helps her focus, it is something.  It isn't about avoiding. Some kids have trouble filtering sensory stimulation. That is how she is wired. It isn't about teaching her how to work in the environment unaided, but by learning what helps her cope with it better and adapt, and to ask for help when needed. She may not be able to move desks, but her teacher can move her seating arrangement to better help her focus and attention.

If you have to redirect her a lot at home when you are 1:1, then think of it at school where the teacher can't give that kind of attention to her. In that case, you need to open discussion with the teacher, school special ed staff (occupational therapist, school psychologist etc) to get her help or special accomodations in the classroom to help her focus. She may even qualify for an aide or shared aide in the class. My daughter had a shared aide when she was in 2nd grade, even if it was just to help her by tapping on her desk to say, "keep working. Do you understand the directions? Or do you need help?"

My dd had focus issues in 2nd grade, so I know how the school tried to help her, but you seem unwilling to consider other options than the "gut it out" approach. No offense.   (BTW- my dd is now in 4th grade. She is still distractable, covers her ears at assemblies, sometimes wears headphones or earplugs, doesn't like noisy environments, gets mad when her classmates talk to her when they aren't supposed to talking, doesn't share an aide anymore, but is also the top of her class. And she is adapting better every day.

 

Quoting lacyd75:

 Well they can't move her desk. Even in 2nd grade here at this school they use tables so therefore there are several kids per table which i don't much care for. Tables are fine for pre-k and K but after that i think kids should have individual desks. but thats just my opinion. and if i were to put silencing headphones on her i have to wonder if i'm not teaching her how to jus avoid instead of tackle the issue head on. And at home trust me we do ALOT of redirecting back to the assignments thats for sure. *sigh*

Quoting mom22tumblebugs:

You can get those noise silencing headphones to muffle sound. Ask for the teacher to use folders are carrels. Have her desk moved away to an area where the kids aren't as talkative. It also helps to have her sit near quieter kids. Alert your teacher to help her redirect her attention back to her assignment.

If all else fails, have her tested for ADD.

She is 8 now, she will have much more maturity as she gets older, and self control to filter her environment.

 

 

 

 

mom22tumblebugs
by Gold Member on Apr. 18, 2013 at 11:03 AM

Another thing to consider is CAPD, central auditory processing disorder.

http://kidshealth.org/parent/medical/ears/central_auditory.html

Symptoms of APD can range from mild to severe and can take many different forms. If you think your child might have a problem processing sounds, consider these questions:

  • Is your child easily distracted or unusually bothered by loud or sudden noises?
  • Are noisy environments upsetting to your child?
  • Does your child's behavior and performance improve in quieter settings?
  • Does your child have difficulty following directions, whether simple or complicated?
  • Does your child have reading, spelling, writing, or other speech-language difficulties?
  • Is abstract information difficult for your child to comprehend?
  • Are verbal (word) math problems difficult for your child?
  • Is your child disorganized and forgetful?
  • Are conversations hard for your child to follow?

APD is an often misunderstood problem because many of the behaviors noted above also can appear in other conditions like learning disabilities, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and even depression. Although APD is often confused with ADHD, it is possible to have both. It is also possible to have APD and specific language impairment or learning disabilities.

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