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Question for teachers, IEP related

Posted by on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:10 PM
  • 14 Replies
Do IEPs annoy you? Honestly please.
My dd starts kindergarten in August, she has an IEP. I do not what to expect of her new IEP or elementary school in general as dd is an only child and I was the youngest of my family, I only remember it from my point of view which was 20 years ago lol I was also the very bright teachers pet. My dd has global delays, mainly in language and social. Her early childhood special education teachers and therapist strongly believe she will thrive. I believe this too but I worry about the teacher's patience with dd. Also I worry bout her eating in a cafeteria as she has problems eating in busy environments, but I'm sure providing an alternative won't be a problem, I hope anyway.
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by on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:10 PM
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Kris_PBG
by on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:18 PM
No - an IEP means the parent is involved, is open to resources for their child, had the follow through to get the assessments needed to qualify for the IEP, etc...

It also means we can hit the ground running instead of months going through the RTI process to figure out what delays are impacting learning.

Starting K is always nerve wracking! Hang in there!!!
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maxswolfsuit
by Max on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:23 PM

Not at all. 

I requested to teach ESE inclusion many years ago. I appreciate that I can make accommodations with an IEP. 

frndlyfn
by Gold Member on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:26 PM

DD has one and she rarely eats her lunch.  They have full day kindergarten so last year was our first year in school system.   We have been lucky that her teachers are open for all communication and to keep her on track.  She has been "promoted"to only one day of communication/speech a week from 2-3 days a week which is a good milestone for 1st grade.  For eating we make sure she has a good full breakfast and then a snack after school while dinner is made.

JCKitten87
by Member on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:28 PM
I never thought of it like that :) thank you. Dd has had 3 years of speech therapy. She went through the assessments for early intervention the month she turned 3 (when the school begins providing services) I did not know about the first steps program until dd was almost 3, so they referred us to the school district. Dd has come so far since she began preschool and she absolutely loves school. She knows her basis phonics, can count to 30 (with true understanding), and is beginning to understand very basic addition :) she loves numbers lol and she wants to read. She turns 5 next month :)

Quoting Kris_PBG:

No - an IEP means the parent is involved, is open to resources for their child, had the follow through to get the assessments needed to qualify for the IEP, etc...



It also means we can hit the ground running instead of months going through the RTI process to figure out what delays are impacting learning.



Starting K is always nerve wracking! Hang in there!!!
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JCKitten87
by Member on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:32 PM
That's awesome! Dd has speech 5 days a week, three times in school and two times at home (provided by the school) they told me they wanted to help her be ready for kindergarten, which I love that they really care. Sadly our district has a reputation for pushing failing children and teens through the system, but I have had all wonderful experience with early education

Quoting frndlyfn:

DD has one and she rarely eats her lunch.  They have full day kindergarten so last year was our first year in school system.   We have been lucky that her teachers are open for all communication and to keep her on track.  She has been "promoted"to only one day of communication/speech a week from 2-3 days a week which is a good milestone for 1st grade.  For eating we make sure she has a good full breakfast and then a snack after school while dinner is made.

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Kris_PBG
by on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:39 PM
Glad I could help you feel more at ease.

Sounds like she is in a great place to start K!

As a K teacher, I can tell you we definitely get kids who would have benefited tremendously from early intervention, but for a variety of reasons, the parents did not get them assessed. Sadly, the collecting data process takes a long time, so many of them go months with the teacher not knowing their specific disability, which sometimes makes teaching them a great challenge and robs the child of additional services they would have qualified for, but did not receive...

A kiddo with an IEP is not an issue - a kiddo who desperately needs an IEP and does not have one is a much bigger issue!!!! :)




Quoting JCKitten87:

I never thought of it like that :) thank you. Dd has had 3 years of speech therapy. She went through the assessments for early intervention the month she turned 3 (when the school begins providing services) I did not know about the first steps program until dd was almost 3, so they referred us to the school district. Dd has come so far since she began preschool and she absolutely loves school. She knows her basis phonics, can count to 30 (with true understanding), and is beginning to understand very basic addition :) she loves numbers lol and she wants to read. She turns 5 next month :)



Quoting Kris_PBG:

No - an IEP means the parent is involved, is open to resources for their child, had the follow through to get the assessments needed to qualify for the IEP, etc...





It also means we can hit the ground running instead of months going through the RTI process to figure out what delays are impacting learning.





Starting K is always nerve wracking! Hang in there!!!

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JCKitten87
by Member on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:54 PM
1 mom liked this
I can't imagine not getting dd help. Even as a first time parent I knew something was off by 18 months. I kind of flew off the handle when autism was mentioned, but I didn't refuse services because of it. My dd doesn't have an actual medical diagnosis but is on a waiting list to be evaluated at a developmental clinic to see if there is a reason behind her delays and social issues. (Now that I'm not in denial, I used to blame my self for having postpartum depression and at the time I was set against any other reasons because her first speech therapist kept saying there were no other issues to worry about)
I know the assessments were done on 3 separate days so they weren't overwhelming :) but it definitely takes time to get the results together and the first IEP made.


Quoting Kris_PBG:

Glad I could help you feel more at ease.



Sounds like she is in a great place to start K!



As a K teacher, I can tell you we definitely get kids who would have benefited tremendously from early intervention, but for a variety of reasons, the parents did not get them assessed. Sadly, the collecting data process takes a long time, so many of them go months with the teacher not knowing their specific disability, which sometimes makes teaching them a great challenge and robs the child of additional services they would have qualified for, but did not receive...



A kiddo with an IEP is not an issue - a kiddo who desperately needs an IEP and does not have one is a much bigger issue!!!! :)








Quoting JCKitten87:

I never thought of it like that :) thank you. Dd has had 3 years of speech therapy. She went through the assessments for early intervention the month she turned 3 (when the school begins providing services) I did not know about the first steps program until dd was almost 3, so they referred us to the school district. Dd has come so far since she began preschool and she absolutely loves school. She knows her basis phonics, can count to 30 (with true understanding), and is beginning to understand very basic addition :) she loves numbers lol and she wants to read. She turns 5 next month :)





Quoting Kris_PBG:

No - an IEP means the parent is involved, is open to resources for their child, had the follow through to get the assessments needed to qualify for the IEP, etc...







It also means we can hit the ground running instead of months going through the RTI process to figure out what delays are impacting learning.







Starting K is always nerve wracking! Hang in there!!!

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SlightlyPerfect
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47 minutes ago
by Member on Apr. 22, 2013 at 8:56 PM

Sort of, but only when it's used as a way to avoid responsibility. Doesn't sound like an issue for you.

slightlyperfect

SaraBethKY
by Bronze Member on Apr. 22, 2013 at 9:30 PM

I have never been annoyed by a student having one. If anything it helps me and gives me direction. I have very little training with special ed modifications and most IEP's pretty much tell the teachers what they should be doing in the classrooms. It is definitely nice to just be told how to do things sometimes instead of "reinventing the wheel"  (I hope that last part didn't make me sound lazy haha) 

JCKitten87
by Member on Apr. 22, 2013 at 9:52 PM
Lol you don't sound lazy. It would definitely be easier on everyone if the teacher knew what to expect before hand. I plan to inform the teacher of my dd's quirks.. like currently she had a necklace with a letter P that is the only thing she is allowed to chew.. sigh she had stopped mouthing things around 2 but began chewing her clothes and hands when she started school. The letter has worked perfect for her too :) I hate that she needs it but it definitely better than the alternative

Quoting SaraBethKY:

I have never been annoyed by a student having one. If anything it helps me and gives me direction. I have very little training with special ed modifications and most IEP's pretty much tell the teachers what they should be doing in the classrooms. It is definitely nice to just be told how to do things sometimes instead of "reinventing the wheel"  (I hope that last part didn't make me sound lazy haha) 

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