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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Timber Wolf Field trip....

Posted by on May. 10, 2013 at 2:44 AM
  • 16 Replies

I'm feeling needy and not getting replys in the homescholing board...LOL

We had an AWESOME field trip today to an Alaskan Timber Wolf Education foundation called Shadowland. 

It was an amazing trip where we met a pack of 9 Wolves rescued from Alaska. It is 3 adults, and hte litter of 6 tha tthe alpha female birthed. They talked about habitat, diet, and reasons for decline of wolves and the pros and cons of having wolves in different areas. it was pretty interesting. 

Kids cuddling with a wolf!

My middle Ds - nose to nose with a young timber wolf!

The big Alpha-male Takota!

Jinx - Homeschooling, Scouting & Karate butt-kicking  Mom to Star Scout Ian 1/98, Scout Sean 9/00, Junior GS Heidi 4/03. Wife to Joe & Alpha to German Shepherd Spazz.

by on May. 10, 2013 at 2:44 AM
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frndlyfn
by Gold Member on May. 10, 2013 at 3:06 AM
1 mom liked this

That is pretty cool.  Are these wolves considered "tamed" or still retain alot of their wild side?  I think the more education about all animals the better.  My brother would have loved this field trip.

Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on May. 10, 2013 at 3:12 AM
They are legally considered wild animals but are very well socialised.

They have 12 acres and they are allowed to run free and hunt but they have training sessions and are well socialised to hang out with the visitors.

They retain many natural habits. As in the alpha couple are introduced first. If they feel the group is "OK" they report back to the pack and the rest of the pack are brought out to visit. If something negative had happened and the alphas freaked, the outing would be over and everyone sent home.

The wolved each have specific jobs and you could tell by how they interacted with everyone where each wolf ranked.


Quoting frndlyfn:

That is pretty cool.  Are these wolves considered "tamed" or still retain alot of their wild side?  I think the more education about all animals the better.  My brother would have loved this field trip.


Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on May. 10, 2013 at 3:16 AM
Amazing wolf facts....
A wolf has twice the crushing jaw pressure of a German Shepherd. gSDs have about 750 lbs. Per square inch. Wolves have 1500 lbs per square inch. This allows them to hunt and crush bones of their prey. We have a German shepherd and the similarities and differences are amazing.

There are records of wolves from prehistoric days and wolves and bears share the same ancestors.

Dog DNA and Wolf DNA are 98% identical.
frndlyfn
by Gold Member on May. 10, 2013 at 3:18 AM

ok cool.  I wasnt sure since where i grew up the focus was on snake preservation as well as all the other forest creatures. Owls, rabbits, mice, some insects, etc.   


Quoting Jinx-Troublex3:

They are legally considered wild animals but are very well socialised.

They have 12 acres and they are allowed to run free and hunt but they have training sessions and are well socialised to hang out with the visitors.

They retain many natural habits. As in the alpha couple are introduced first. If they feel the group is "OK" they report back to the pack and the rest of the pack are brought out to visit. If something negative had happened and the alphas freaked, the outing would be over and everyone sent home.

The wolved each have specific jobs and you could tell by how they interacted with everyone where each wolf ranked.


Quoting frndlyfn:

That is pretty cool.  Are these wolves considered "tamed" or still retain alot of their wild side?  I think the more education about all animals the better.  My brother would have loved this field trip.




Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on May. 10, 2013 at 3:22 AM
They had a good discussion. On how wolves help and hurt habitats. Wolves do hunt beef and sheep of ranchers and can be a nuisance. However, they naturally care for their family and are awesome parents. Humans are NOT their prey.





Quoting frndlyfn:

ok cool.  I wasnt sure since where i grew up the focus was on snake preservation as well as all the other forest creatures. Owls, rabbits, mice, some insects, etc.   



Quoting Jinx-Troublex3:

They are legally considered wild animals but are very well socialised.



They have 12 acres and they are allowed to run free and hunt but they have training sessions and are well socialised to hang out with the visitors.



They retain many natural habits. As in the alpha couple are introduced first. If they feel the group is "OK" they report back to the pack and the rest of the pack are brought out to visit. If something negative had happened and the alphas freaked, the outing would be over and everyone sent home.



The wolved each have specific jobs and you could tell by how they interacted with everyone where each wolf ranked.





Quoting frndlyfn:

That is pretty cool.  Are these wolves considered "tamed" or still retain alot of their wild side?  I think the more education about all animals the better.  My brother would have loved this field trip.







annelauer
by on May. 10, 2013 at 3:48 AM

What a great field trip!

mom22tumblebugs
by Gold Member on May. 10, 2013 at 9:05 AM
That is very cool. But I do hope they emphasized that you cannot and should not approach wolves in the wild. Wolves are not the same as dogs, which are domesticated, though they look very similar.
wakymom
by Ruby Member on May. 10, 2013 at 9:13 AM

 How cool!

There's a place about an hr from us that has wolves who can no longer live in the wild. Very interesting program, but can't up close and personal like you did.

 

 

 

 

 

May is STURGE-WEBER


Awareness Month

Barabell
by Barbara on May. 10, 2013 at 9:36 AM

Wow, they're beautiful!

Jinx-Troublex3
by Platinum Member on May. 10, 2013 at 10:37 AM
They did mention that however stressed how in the wild, they generally hide and wouldn't be around for you to get close.

We did compare my German Shepherd to the wolves...one of them specifically was VERY similar.


Quoting mom22tumblebugs:

That is very cool. But I do hope they emphasized that you cannot and should not approach wolves in the wild. Wolves are not the same as dogs, which are domesticated, though they look very similar.

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