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Elementary School Kids Elementary School Kids

Common Core. Take it or leave it?

Posted by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:31 PM
  • 18 Replies

Just curious as to what other moms are thinking about these new "rigorous standards"?

by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:31 PM
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Replies (1-10):
steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 9:59 PM

 They haven't gone into effect in my state yet.

frndlyfn
by Gold Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 10:28 PM

I do not know enough about them since they started last year.  I will have to see how it goes this year.  It drives me nuts when they talk about this it is on a night that our children are with us so i miss half the info.

Cherryfire73
by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 10:30 PM

Some of the things I have heard and read are kind of disturbing.

mhaney03
by Bronze Member on Aug. 30, 2013 at 10:32 PM

LEAVING IT way behind!!  We homeschool now.

BlueKWoz
by on Aug. 30, 2013 at 10:42 PM

My children's school instituted it last year, this is our second year and I think its great.  They have more hands on science, instead of trying to teach a million science lessons they have four topics that they spend months on, my 3rd grader last year had anatomy and he learned around 50 bones in the body, jumped rope with his teacher to figure out how the body moved, it was three months of so many ways to learn about this.  They read mostly non fiction now, they delve deeper into the math curriculum, use a lot more manipulatives, I think they have made really good changes for the most part.

Each state is in charge of setting curriculum, the common core is just standards, such as each child in K should learn to count to 100, how the school teaches it and what resources they use is up to whomever writes the curriculum for your district.

I think there is a lot of misinformation, misconception and fear and so far I have seen nothing that has alarmed me.

TroyboysMom
by on Aug. 31, 2013 at 2:52 AM
3 moms liked this

I think a lot of people don't actually understand the standards (or how standards differ from curriculum, or even the execution of either instruction to meet standards, or execution of curriculum - all of which are different things), or what they entail, or even how they are different than the old standards. I think that's the hugest issue - there are so many people operating on HUGE amounts of misinformation that many, many people get confused. 

I think there are a lot of really very good aspects of Common Core, but just like anything else, one size doesn't fit all. I love the idea of being able to move from one state to another that subscribes to CC, and not having to worry quite as much about whether my child will be far ahead or far behind. I am really, really pleased with the depth of content the CC standards are striving for. The efficacy is going to be in the curriculum used to support it, sure, but even more so, with the teachers who are teaching to it. There are still going to be children whose needs aren't precisely met by Common Core, or any large-scale standards set. The efficacy with which the standards are met depends entirely on the teachers who teach to meet those standards.  

ashboot
by Member on Aug. 31, 2013 at 8:17 AM
1 mom liked this
I couldn't have said it better!


Quoting TroyboysMom:

I think a lot of people don't actually understand the standards (or how standards differ from curriculum, or even the execution of either instruction to meet standards, or execution of curriculum - all of which are different things), or what they entail, or even how they are different than the old standards. I think that's the hugest issue - there are so many people operating on HUGE amounts of misinformation that many, many people get confused. 

I think there are a lot of really very good aspects of Common Core, but just like anything else, one size doesn't fit all. I love the idea of being able to move from one state to another that subscribes to CC, and not having to worry quite as much about whether my child will be far ahead or far behind. I am really, really pleased with the depth of content the CC standards are striving for. The efficacy is going to be in the curriculum used to support it, sure, but even more so, with the teachers who are teaching to it. There are still going to be children whose needs aren't precisely met by Common Core, or any large-scale standards set. The efficacy with which the standards are met depends entirely on the teachers who teach to meet those standards.  


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maxswolfsuit
by Max on Aug. 31, 2013 at 8:29 AM
1 mom liked this


Quoting TroyboysMom:

I think a lot of people don't actually understand the standards (or how standards differ from curriculum, or even the execution of either instruction to meet standards, or execution of curriculum - all of which are different things), or what they entail, or even how they are different than the old standards. I think that's the hugest issue - there are so many people operating on HUGE amounts of misinformation that many, many people get confused. 

I think there are a lot of really very good aspects of Common Core, but just like anything else, one size doesn't fit all. I love the idea of being able to move from one state to another that subscribes to CC, and not having to worry quite as much about whether my child will be far ahead or far behind. I am really, really pleased with the depth of content the CC standards are striving for. The efficacy is going to be in the curriculum used to support it, sure, but even more so, with the teachers who are teaching to it. There are still going to be children whose needs aren't precisely met by Common Core, or any large-scale standards set. The efficacy with which the standards are met depends entirely on the teachers who teach to meet those standards.  

You saved me so much typing. 

I am getting increasingly frustrated by the misinformation being spread about Core. Every time the topic comes up on here I see multiple mothers stating things about Core as fact that simply aren't true. 

Core does not dictate curriculum.  Individual schools and states decide their own curriculum. Blaming Core for poorly made local decision is off base. Not to mention the fact that just because it's different doesn't mean it's bad. Parents need to take a step back and do more research into it before jumping on the "Core Sucks" bandwagon. 

bsuku
by Bronze Member on Aug. 31, 2013 at 8:31 AM

I personally like them. I know my job will become harder but I became a teacher to do what is best for students! I do think the CCSS are grounded in research and when taught correctly, will allow our students to become college and carrer ready, which is the goal of K-12 education. I do think the learning curve for the teachers will be steep and a hard climb, so the standards are getting a bad reputation before they are fully in place. I love the fact that my child will be assessed by the same standards as children from other states as well. We currently live in the state with the 2nd hardest state assessment yet, DD's score are compared to states with much easier tests. Is that fair when competing for college scholarships? 

All the positives are there yet, the negatives are there too. Structures and supports must be put into place to scaffold the students learning to the new standards to eliminate the gaps in the learning. This is one of the negatives I see with the shift. Most teachers, myself included, don't have a complete understanding of what the students will be expected to know and be able to do, so until every item is finalized, we don't know which go to fill or how to fill,them. 

I think this is a time of change in education and it is scary but exciting as well. 

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Aug. 31, 2013 at 8:38 AM
1 mom liked this

The changes in my district because of Core are all positive ones. 

The teachers who relied on direct instruction and worksheets are being forced to try other things. It is no longer acceptable for students to spend long portions of the school day in their seats quietly listening to the teacher and doing independent work. 

The emphasis is on hands on learning and collaboration with other students. The students are out of their seats moving to different areas of the classroom all day. They are working with one another on tasks and projects. They are challenged to create things and solve problems using ingenuity. 

Students are learning to express their ideas in speaking and writing in more complicated ways. They are also learning to listen to classmates and analyze how other people think in different ways. 

I can't imagine a parent who would prefer thier child to be sitting in a desk silently for most of the day. 

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