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What do your kids say makes the "BEST" teacher?

Posted by on Oct. 20, 2013 at 7:28 AM
  • 12 Replies

What do your kids share about what they think makes a great teacher.

Do you do anything special for the  great teacher?

by on Oct. 20, 2013 at 7:28 AM
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Replies (1-10):
coolmommy2x
by Gold Member on Oct. 20, 2013 at 8:30 AM
DD LOVES school and has had great teachers so in her mind there are no bad teachers. She has an IEP for speech and her teachers have been amazingly supportive. She thinks she's a genius and doesn't realize she struggles and they've been great.

DS isn't quite the fan of school so while he's had teachers he's really liked, any teacher who gives homework is a bad teacher in his mind. With the exception of 1 teacher we've experienced, we've had great teachers.

I always send in treats for the teacher on Halloween, give generous holiday gifts, treats on Valentine's Day, do something for Teacher Appreciation Day and give generous gifts on the last day of school. When DS left elementary school, I gave the principal a gift card and thanked him for being a part of the village that got him through school (he struggled but found his niche in middle school).
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mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 20, 2013 at 9:30 AM
1 mom liked this

I am going to answer this question the same way I did it's counterpart.  Elementary aged students are not mature or intellectually adept enough to ascertain what makes a "great" teacher.  The teacher who is "fun" all the time would be there choice, even if nothing is going on from an academic standpoint.  This is a very subjective question for adults, let alone kids.  Now, if you want to know what adults think makes an excellent teacher, then you will get some interesting feedback that you might be able to put to use.

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Oct. 20, 2013 at 10:15 AM
2 moms liked this

Kids will say the best teachers are nice and fun. 

Personally, I think that's totally off base. Teachers who cater to students and parents and work to make sure everyone is always happy are missing opportunities to push kids to to reach their potential. 

The first month of school one of my students absolutely hated me. He was incredibly unmotivated and lazy. He either didn't do assignments or wrote in anything to get it over with. He didn't listen to a word of instruction and never participated in group work. That just isn't acceptable to me. So he was constantly being reprimanded and punished. 

His mom complained that he didn't want to come to school anymore because I was so mean to him. I explained that I wasn't being mean, I was holding him accountable for not doing his job. In the past he hadn't been consider a behavior problem because he wasn't disruptive. But in my eyes not learning is the biggest problem a child can have.

After a month he started to turn around. For the past five weeks he's been a different student. He's participating and reading. His grades have improved along with his attitude. 

I asked him on Friday why he finally decided to try. He said none of his other teachers were mean about it when he didn't what he was supposed to. 

Prime example of why a kid's dream teacher probably isn't the one that's going to help them learn the most. 

maxswolfsuit
by Max on Oct. 20, 2013 at 10:21 AM

Also, last year in PreK my son had a terrible teacher. The way she presented the material was not educationally sound. She had been teaching for 35 years and was still teaching the same way she did when she started. 

My son was coming home refusing to try to read because she was telling him he couldn't do things the other kids could. We are still struggling with his confidence this year because she compared students so much. Even though my son was doing fine, she was always telling him and the rest of the class how much better a couple of the top kids were doing. 

But you know what? He loved her. He talked about her all the time and still draws pictures of her and for her. He never thought she made him feel bad, he just thought it was him.

mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 20, 2013 at 10:21 AM

A few years ago my district decided part of the teacher evaluation would be student input (keep in mind these are high schoolers).  This was also done at the elementary and junior levels as well.  Anyway, it quickly became known that if you brought candy/treats the day of the evaluation, the kids bubbled really high marks without anyone saying a thing.  Kids, particularly when they aren't paying for the course, i.e. college, do not have the maturity to make judgments based on what they should.  Being "fun" is what matters to them.  They are very short-term thinkers, versus long-term analysts.

ETA: The ludcrious way of evaluating the teachers, student input, was eliminated after 2 years.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Kids will say the best teachers are nice and fun. 

Personally, I think that's totally off base. Teachers who cater to students and parents and work to make sure everyone is always happy are missing opportunities to push kids to to reach their potential. 

The first month of school one of my students absolutely hated me. He was incredibly unmotivated and lazy. He either didn't do assignments or wrote in anything to get it over with. He didn't listen to a word of instruction and never participated in group work. That just isn't acceptable to me. So he was constantly being reprimanded and punished. 

His mom complained that he didn't want to come to school anymore because I was so mean to him. I explained that I wasn't being mean, I was holding him accountable for not doing his job. In the past he hadn't been consider a behavior problem because he wasn't disruptive. But in my eyes not learning is the biggest problem a child can have.

After a month he started to turn around. For the past five weeks he's been a different student. He's participating and reading. His grades have improved along with his attitude. 

I asked him on Friday why he finally decided to try. He said none of his other teachers were mean about it when he didn't what he was supposed to. 

Prime example of why a kid's dream teacher probably isn't the one that's going to help them learn the most. 



maxswolfsuit
by Max on Oct. 20, 2013 at 10:31 AM

We have a senior reception for the graduating seniors who attended school. The kids get up and share memories from their years in school. 

Every year it's like the Mr. L fan club.  Mr. L worked at the school for years and was a known slacker. His class "earned" movies and free time a couple of times a week. He brought a couch in and would lay in it when the kids were working. He would take on the phone during the day and let his students hang out until he was done with his conversation. When our principal retired the new principal pretty much told him he had to start working or leave the school. So he left the school and was asked to leave the next school he went to too. 

But ask the kids, he was the best teacher they ever had. 

Quoting mjande4:

A few years ago my district decided part of the teacher evaluation would be student input (keep in mind these are high schoolers).  This was also done at the elementary and junior levels as well.  Anyway, it quickly became known that if you brought candy/treats the day of the evaluation, the kids bubbled really high marks without anyone saying a thing.  Kids, particularly when they aren't paying for the course, i.e. college, do not have the maturity to make judgments based on what they should.  Being "fun" is what matters to them.  They are very short-term thinkers, versus long-term analysts.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Kids will say the best teachers are nice and fun. 

Personally, I think that's totally off base. Teachers who cater to students and parents and work to make sure everyone is always happy are missing opportunities to push kids to to reach their potential. 

The first month of school one of my students absolutely hated me. He was incredibly unmotivated and lazy. He either didn't do assignments or wrote in anything to get it over with. He didn't listen to a word of instruction and never participated in group work. That just isn't acceptable to me. So he was constantly being reprimanded and punished. 

His mom complained that he didn't want to come to school anymore because I was so mean to him. I explained that I wasn't being mean, I was holding him accountable for not doing his job. In the past he hadn't been consider a behavior problem because he wasn't disruptive. But in my eyes not learning is the biggest problem a child can have.

After a month he started to turn around. For the past five weeks he's been a different student. He's participating and reading. His grades have improved along with his attitude. 

I asked him on Friday why he finally decided to try. He said none of his other teachers were mean about it when he didn't what he was supposed to. 

Prime example of why a kid's dream teacher probably isn't the one that's going to help them learn the most. 




mjande4
by Platinum Member on Oct. 20, 2013 at 10:35 AM

Yep.  We had one of those a few years back and after an adminstrative change he was highly encouraged to find a new job.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

We have a senior reception for the graduating seniors who attended school. The kids get up and share memories from their years in school. 

Every year it's like the Mr. L fan club.  Mr. L worked at the school for years and was a known slacker. His class "earned" movies and free time a couple of times a week. He brought a couch in and would lay in it when the kids were working. He would take on the phone during the day and let his students hang out until he was done with his conversation. When our principal retired the new principal pretty much told him he had to start working or leave the school. So he left the school and was asked to leave the next school he went to too. 

But ask the kids, he was the best teacher they ever had. 

Quoting mjande4:

A few years ago my district decided part of the teacher evaluation would be student input (keep in mind these are high schoolers).  This was also done at the elementary and junior levels as well.  Anyway, it quickly became known that if you brought candy/treats the day of the evaluation, the kids bubbled really high marks without anyone saying a thing.  Kids, particularly when they aren't paying for the course, i.e. college, do not have the maturity to make judgments based on what they should.  Being "fun" is what matters to them.  They are very short-term thinkers, versus long-term analysts.


Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Kids will say the best teachers are nice and fun. 

Personally, I think that's totally off base. Teachers who cater to students and parents and work to make sure everyone is always happy are missing opportunities to push kids to to reach their potential. 

The first month of school one of my students absolutely hated me. He was incredibly unmotivated and lazy. He either didn't do assignments or wrote in anything to get it over with. He didn't listen to a word of instruction and never participated in group work. That just isn't acceptable to me. So he was constantly being reprimanded and punished. 

His mom complained that he didn't want to come to school anymore because I was so mean to him. I explained that I wasn't being mean, I was holding him accountable for not doing his job. In the past he hadn't been consider a behavior problem because he wasn't disruptive. But in my eyes not learning is the biggest problem a child can have.

After a month he started to turn around. For the past five weeks he's been a different student. He's participating and reading. His grades have improved along with his attitude. 

I asked him on Friday why he finally decided to try. He said none of his other teachers were mean about it when he didn't what he was supposed to. 

Prime example of why a kid's dream teacher probably isn't the one that's going to help them learn the most. 






steelcrazy
by Emerald Member on Oct. 20, 2013 at 1:14 PM

 I had a few of those kind of teachers in HS as well, one of them is still there and I hope that they get rid of him before my kids get to HS.  Yes, I loved him as a teen, but don't want my kids to have him because he is an awful teacher who doesn't really teach the kids anything other than how to slack off and coast through class.

Quoting mjande4:

Yep.  We had one of those a few years back and after an adminstrative change he was highly encouraged to find a new job.

 

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

We have a senior reception for the graduating seniors who attended school. The kids get up and share memories from their years in school. 

Every year it's like the Mr. L fan club.  Mr. L worked at the school for years and was a known slacker. His class "earned" movies and free time a couple of times a week. He brought a couch in and would lay in it when the kids were working. He would take on the phone during the day and let his students hang out until he was done with his conversation. When our principal retired the new principal pretty much told him he had to start working or leave the school. So he left the school and was asked to leave the next school he went to too. 

But ask the kids, he was the best teacher they ever had. 

Quoting mjande4:

A few years ago my district decided part of the teacher evaluation would be student input (keep in mind these are high schoolers).  This was also done at the elementary and junior levels as well.  Anyway, it quickly became known that if you brought candy/treats the day of the evaluation, the kids bubbled really high marks without anyone saying a thing.  Kids, particularly when they aren't paying for the course, i.e. college, do not have the maturity to make judgments based on what they should.  Being "fun" is what matters to them.  They are very short-term thinkers, versus long-term analysts.

 

Quoting maxswolfsuit:

Kids will say the best teachers are nice and fun. 

Personally, I think that's totally off base. Teachers who cater to students and parents and work to make sure everyone is always happy are missing opportunities to push kids to to reach their potential. 

The first month of school one of my students absolutely hated me. He was incredibly unmotivated and lazy. He either didn't do assignments or wrote in anything to get it over with. He didn't listen to a word of instruction and never participated in group work. That just isn't acceptable to me. So he was constantly being reprimanded and punished. 

His mom complained that he didn't want to come to school anymore because I was so mean to him. I explained that I wasn't being mean, I was holding him accountable for not doing his job. In the past he hadn't been consider a behavior problem because he wasn't disruptive. But in my eyes not learning is the biggest problem a child can have.

After a month he started to turn around. For the past five weeks he's been a different student. He's participating and reading. His grades have improved along with his attitude. 

I asked him on Friday why he finally decided to try. He said none of his other teachers were mean about it when he didn't what he was supposed to. 

Prime example of why a kid's dream teacher probably isn't the one that's going to help them learn the most. 

 

 


 

 

 

carriemealy35
by on Oct. 20, 2013 at 2:07 PM

My daughter loves her 5th grade teacher. She says she is nice and understanding and does not "yell". :) She is pregnant and my daughter wanted to get her a baby gift. So we got her some infant socks that look like shoes. Super cute.

TroyboysMom
by on Oct. 21, 2013 at 2:28 AM
1 mom liked this

While I think this is largely true, asking children what they value in a teacher isn't entirely lacking in value, either. You will get the majority who say the teacher needs to be fun or never give homework, but I asked Ds and his friend who was over this afternoon, and after popping off with, "Someone who makes learning fun," they came back after conferring for a couple minutes and said that a great teacher was one who really cared about the kids in the learning, and they (the students) could tell. "It means more when you can feel how much the teacher really cares about what you're doing. It makes it harder to disappoint him." was a direct quote. They both then specifically referenced the teacher they shared last year. To me, that's a valuable insight - and something to look for in a future teacher.

Quoting mjande4:

I am going to answer this question the same way I did it's counterpart.  Elementary aged students are not mature or intellectually adept enough to ascertain what makes a "great" teacher.  The teacher who is "fun" all the time would be there choice, even if nothing is going on from an academic standpoint.  This is a very subjective question for adults, let alone kids.  Now, if you want to know what adults think makes an excellent teacher, then you will get some interesting feedback that you might be able to put to use.


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